9.                               Waste Management IMPLICATIONS

9.1                           Legislation and Standards

The following legislations relate to the handling, treatment and disposal of waste in HKSAR, and will be considered in assessing potential impacts and their avoidance or mitigation:

·                    Waste Disposal Ordinance (Cap 354) [9-1];

·                    Waste Disposal (Chemical Waste) (General) Regulation (Cap 354) [9-2];

·                    Land (Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordinance (Cap 28) [9-3]; and

·                    Public Health and Municipal Service Ordinance (Cap 132) – Public Cleansing and Prevention of Nuisances By-laws [9-4].

9.1.1                       Waste Disposal Ordinance

The Waste Disposal Ordinance (WDO) prohibits unauthorised disposal of wastes. Construction and Demolition (C&D) waste is not directly defined in the WDO but is considered as “trade waste” which is defined as waste from any trade, manufacturer or business, or any wasted building, or civil engineering materials, but does not include animal waste.

Under the WDO, wastes can only be disposed of at sites licensed by EPD.  Breach of these regulations can lead to a fine and/or imprisonment.  The WDO also stipulates the requirements for issuing licenses for the collection and transportation of wastes.  Licenses are however not required for the collection and transportation of C&D waste or trade waste.

9.1.2                       Waste Disposal (Chemical Waste) (General) Regulation

Chemical waste includes any scrap materials, or unwanted substances specified under Schedule 1 of this Regulation, if such a substance or chemical occurs in such a form, quantity or concentration that causes pollution or constitutes a danger to health or risk of pollution to the environment.

A person shall not produce, or cause to be produced, chemical wastes unless he is registered with EPD.  Any person who contravenes this requirement commits an offence and is liable to a fine and/or imprisonment.  Chemical wastes must be treated, utilising on-site plant licensed by EPD or have a licensed collector to transport the wastes to a licensed facility.  For each consignment of wastes, the waste producer, collector and disposer of the wastes must sign all relevant parts of a computerised trip ticket.  The system is designed to trace wastes from production to disposal.

This regulation also prescribes the storage facilities to be provided on site including labelling and warning sign. To minimise the risks of pollution and danger to human health or life, the waste producer is required to prepare and make available written emergency procedures for spillage, leakage or accidents arising from storage of chemical wastes. The waste producer must also provide employees with training for such procedures.

9.1.3                       Land (Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordinance

The inert portion of C&D materials may be taken to public filling facilities including public filling area, public filling barging points and stockpiling areas. These facilities usually form part of land reclamation schemes and are operated by CEDD. This ordinance requires Dumping Licenses (to be issued by CEDD) to be obtained by individuals or companies, who deliver inert C&D materials to the public filling facilities. 

Individual licenses and windscreen stickers are issued for each vehicle involved.  Public filling areas will accept only inert building debris, soil, rock and broken concrete. There is no size limitation on the rock and broken concrete, and a small amount of timber mixed with inert material is permissible. The material should, however, be free from marine mud, household refuse, plastic, metal, individual and chemical wastes, animal and vegetable matters and any other materials considered unsuitable by the Filling Supervisor.

9.1.4                       Public Cleansing and Prevention of Nuisances by-Laws

These by-laws provide further control on illegal tipping of wastes on unauthorised (unlicensed) sites.  Illegal dumping of wastes can lead to a fine and imprisonment.

9.1.5                       Other Relevant Guidelines

The following documents and guidelines also relate to waste management and disposal:

Table 9-1 :  Other relevant documents and information

Bureau / Department

Documents / Guidelines / Technical Circulars

Planning, Environmental and Lands Branch

· Waste Disposal Plan for Hong Kong (December 1989) [9-5]

· Waste Reduction Framework Plan, 1998 to 2007 [9-6]

 

Environment, Transport and Works Bureau

·         Works Branch Technical Circular (WBTC) No. 32/92, The Use of Tropical Hard Wood on Construction Site [9-7]

·         WBTC No. 2/93, Public Dumps [9-8]

·         Works Bureau TC No 2/93B, Public Filling Facilities [9-9]

·         WBTC No. 16/96, Wet Soil in Public Dumps [9-10]

·         Works Bureau TC Nos. 4/98 and 4/98A, Use of Public Fill in Reclamation and Earth Filling Project [9-11]

·         Works Bureau TC Nos. 25/99, 25/99A and 25/99C, Incorporation of Information on Construction and Demolition Material Management in Public Works Sub-committee Papers [9-12]

·         Works Bureau TC No. 12/2000, Fill Management [9-13]

·         Works Bureau TC No. 19/2001, Metallic Site Hoardings and Signboards [9-14]

·         Works Bureau TC No. 06/2002, Enhanced Specification for Site Cleanliness and Tidiness [9-15]

·         Works Bureau TC No. 12/2002, Specification Facilitating the Use of Recycled Aggregates [9-16]

·         Works Bureau TC No. 21/2002, Trip-ticket System for Disposal of Construction and Demolition Material [9-17]

·         Environment, Transport and Works Bureau Technical Circular (ETWBTC) (Works) No. 33/2002, Management of Construction and Demolition Material Including Rock [9-18]

·         ETWBTC (Works) No. 34/2002, Management of Dredged / Excavated Sediment [9-19]

·         ETWBTC (Works) No. 15/2003, Waste Management on Construction Sites [9-20]

EPD / CEDD

·         New Disposal Arrangements for Construction Waste (1992) [9-21]

EPD

·         Code of Practice on the Packaging, Labeling and Storage of Chemical Wastes (1992) [9-22]

PlanD

·         Environmental Guidelines for Planning In Hong Kong (1990), Hong Kong Planning and Standards Guidelines [9-23]

 

According to ETWBTC No. 33/2002[9-18], for Designated Projects, a C&D Material Management Plan has to be submitted to the Public Fill Committee in case of C&D materials exceed 50,000m3. 

ETWBTC No. 15/2003[9-20], which supersedes “WBTC No. 5/98, On-site Sorting of Construction Waste on Demolition Sites” and “WBTC No. 29/2000, Waste Management Plan”, sets out the policy and procedures requiring contractors to prepare and implement an enhanced Waste Management Plan to encourage on-site sorting of C&D materials and to reduce C&D waste generation during construction. 

9.1.6                       Landfill Disposal Criteria for Contaminated Soil

Excavated contaminated soil has to meet certain criteria before disposal to landfill is allowed. The criteria are set out in the Guidance Notes for Investigation and Remediation of Contaminated Sites of: Petrol Filling Stations; Boatyards and Car Repair/Dismantling Workshops [9-24].  These criteria relate primarily to Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) limits.  In case these limits are exceeded, in-situ treatments would be required before final disposal to landfill.

9.1.7                       Disposal Criteria for Dredged / Excavated Sediment

ETWBTC No. 34/2002[9-19] stipulates the procedures for seeking approval to dredged / excavated sediment and the management framework for marine disposal of such sediment.  Applications for approval of dredging / excavation proposal and allocation of marine disposal shall be made to the Secretary of Marine Fill Committee.  Marine Dumping Permits are required from EPD for the disposal of dredged/ excavated sediment.

9.2                           Construction Phase

9.2.1                       Potential Sources of Wastes

During the construction phase, the main activities (land based) that will potentially generate waste include excavation, tunnelling, demolition and construction of station and associated structures.  Typical waste types associated with these activities include:

·                    C&D materials;

·                    Excavated contaminated materials, marine deposit and alluvium;

·                    Chemical waste;

·                    Sewage; and

·                    General refuse.

9.2.2                       Assessment Methodology

The potential environmental impacts associated with the handling and disposal of waste arising from the construction works will be assessed in accordance with the following:

·                    Estimation of the types, timing and quantities of the wastes to be generated; and

·                    Assessment of the potential impact on the capacity of waste collection, transfer and disposal facilities.

 

Secondary environmental impacts due to the management of waste, including potential air emission and noise arising from the temporary spoil stockpiling, barging facility and disposal route have been assessed and evaluated in the previous sections.

9.2.3                       C&D Materials

9.2.3.1                C&D Materials Generated

The proposed alignment, station will run through various layers of materials including rock at the bottom, marine deposits and alluvium (as residual material from previous reclamation works) at some of the locations, and fill material on the top.   These materials will need to be excavated for cut-&-cover activity.  For bored and mined tunnelling, only the spoil within the tunnel will be excavated.

Table 9-2 gives the estimated quantity of C&D materials to be excavated in accordance with the C&D Material Management Plans for KSL[9-25] [9-26] prepared by the Design Team.  The corresponding Fill and Surplus Materials Data Forms, as extracted from the C&DMMPs are given in Appendix 9-1.

Table 9-2 :  Summary of annual generated quantities of C&D materials

 

 

Annual Quantity of C&D Materials Generated, m3

C&D Materials

 

2004

2005

2006

2007

Total

Soil Material

Fill

-

    276,900

    305,800

     -

    582,700

 

Grade IV & V

-

    149,600

      73,000

     -

    222,600

 

Others

           -  

            -  

          800

          -  

          800

 

From D-wall installation

           -  

      73,700

      96,600

          -  

    170,300

Rock

Grade III or above - MDG/SDG

           -  

      104,600

    75,000

          700  

    180,300

Artificial Hard material

bituminous / concrete pavement

-

      29,200

      15,400

          -  

     44,600

C&D Waste

 

-

       4,300

      10,300

     2,900

     17,500

 

Sub Total

      -

    638,300

    576,900

     3,600

 1,218,800

 

The total volume of C&D materials is estimated to be 1,218,800m3 and the maximum annual generation of excavated material would be about 638,300m3 at Year 2005.

9.2.3.2                Mitigation Measures Adopted to Minimise C&D Material

The combination of the urban setting and the nature of the physical constraints have limited the availability of alternative schemes for the station and tunnel construction (see Chapter 4).  The current design is to use bored tunnelling along Canton Road, cut-&-cover techniques for both the WKN and other tunnel sections, and mined tunnelling underneath FMPHQ and at Cherry Street.

Measures have been adopted to minimise the generation of C&D materials at the outset during the design stage.  As excavation cannot be avoided, only limited measures can be taken to minimise the quantity of C&D materials, including:

·                    Adoption of tunnelling construction techniques (e.g. bored tunnelling along Canton Road) that would minimise the amount of excavation as far as possible;

·                    Reduction of the size and the number of offline plant rooms;

·                    Minimisation of the overall size of the plant buildings and tunnel box sections through effective structural scheming for plant building and tunnel layout; and

·                    Efficient use of the space for station layout to minimise the overall width of the station and tunnel box sections.

 

9.2.3.3                Reuse of C&D Materials

The opportunity of reusing excavated fill material for backfilling and reinstatement works has been maximised by identified temporary stockpiles near to the work site.  Several temporary stockpile locations have been identified as shown in Figures 4-1-1 to 4-1-3. 

The tunnel to the north of the WKN will be constructed in segments of about 100m.  Depending on site constraints, a portion of the excavated C&D material of the tunnel segment will be temporarily stored in the work front.  When the tunnel segment is constructed, the excavated C&D will be backfilled for reinstatement.  The process will then be repeated for other segments. This method will maximise the reuse of C&D materials, and hence reduce the storage of C&D materials and the transporting time from the excavation site to the stockpiles.

It is estimated that approximately 331,100m3 of the inert C&D materials could be reused and the rest 887,700m3 would need to be disposed.  A summary of the reused materials is given below.

Table 9-3 :  Summary of C&D material generated, reused and disposed

 

 

Quantity of C&D Materials, m3

 C&D Materials

 

Generated

Reused

Disposed

Soil Material

Fill

582,700

308,500

274,200

 

Grade IV & V

222,600

        20,800

201,800

 

Others

800

            -  

800

 

From D-wall installation

    170,300

            -  

      170,300

Rock

Grade III or above - MDG/SDG

180,300

1,800

178,500

Artificial material

bituminous / concrete pavement

44,600

            -  

       44,600

C&D Waste

 

     17,500

            -  

       17,500

 

Sub Total

1,218,800

331,100

887,700

 

The reused C&D materials would consist of fill grade IV and V decomposed granite materials.  It is anticipated that the excavated grade IV and V decomposed granite materials consists of mainly grade V, which is suitable for backfilling.  Concrete debris will not be used as an on-site backfill material due to its relatively large size, except for those less than 150mm in diameter which can be used as fill when mixed with general fill materials.  It is also difficult to control the quality of compaction using concrete debris as fill.  The actual amount of reused C&D material will depend on the content and quality of the excavated materials.

9.2.3.4                On-site sorting of C&D material

All C&D materials arising from the construction of KSL from WKN to NAC Station will be sorted on-site to recover the inert C&D materials and reusable and recyclable materials prior to disposal off-site.  All inert C&D materials will be broken down by handheld breakers according to the Dumping Licence conditions before disposal to public filling outlets by barges.

All surplus C&D materials will become the property of the Contractor once they are removed from the site.  The Contractor will be responsible for devising a system to work for on-site sorting of C&D materials and promptly remove all sorted and processed material arising from the construction activities to minimise temporary stockpiling on-site.  It is recommended that the system should include the identification of the source of generation, estimated quantity, arrangement for on-site sorting and / or collection, temporary storage areas, and frequency of collection by recycling Contractors or frequency of removal off-site.

It has been assumed that inert C&D materials (e.g. soil, building debris, concrete) will be sorted out from C&D materials at source to avoid double handling.  Silty / clayey materials from alluvium and marine deposits will be identified at source.  Non-contaminated alluvial and marine deposits will be transported by leak proof trucks to eliminate water leakage during transportation to the barging facility for open sea disposal.  The trucks should also be covered with impervious sheeting to prevent any dust emissions.

9.2.3.5                Disposal Programme for C&D Material

The estimated disposal programme of surplus C&D material is shown below:

Table 9-4 :  Summary of annual disposal quantities of C&D materials

 

Annual Disposal Quantity, m3

 

Disposal Method

2004

2005

2006

2007

Total

Public Fill

---

568,800

300,700

700

870,200

Landfill

---

4,300

10,300

2,900

17,500

 

There will be approximately 870,200m3 of C&D materials that need to be disposed off-site as public fill.  A number of potential public fills has been identified from CEDD’s Fill Management database (Table 9-5.).

Table 9-5:  Potential public fill sites and the annual inert C&D waste generated between Yr 2005 and Yr 2008 

 

Volume by Years (million m3)

Project

2005

2006

2007

2008

Penny’s Bay Reclamation Stage 2

3.226

3.267

1.455

---

Yam O Further Reclamation

---

3.360

4.440

3.960

Sub-Total

3.226

6.627

5.895

3.960

Present Project (Public Fill required)

0.57

0.3

0.007

---

Source: CEDD Fill Management database from http://www.ced.gov.hk/eng/index.htm

 

The Project Proponent shall notify CEDD of the estimated spoil volumes to be generated, and liaise and agree with the Public Fill Committee for the disposal of surplus inert C&D materials including good quality rock during the detailed design phase of the project.

The C&D waste materials include those from the construction of the cut-&-cover tunnels and bored tunnel.  The spoil from the TBM launching shaft will be transported by a conveyor belt system to the nearest ground level, and then be transported by dump trucks to the barging facility for final disposal (e.g. approved Public Filling Area, where the C&D materials will be designated to various development projects that require public fill for reclamation and earth filling purposes).  This will ensure that the distance travelled by the transportation vehicles is optimised.  The location of barging facilities is shown in Figure 4-1-2, and the transportation routings of the trucks to and from barging point are indicated in Appendix 9-2.

The peak hourly flow of lorries carrying C&D materials to the barging facilities for the entire KSL (from TST to Nam Cheong) would be approximately 43 veh/hr.

9.2.4                       Imported Fill Material

It is anticipated that any fill materials required will be sourced from the excavated materials stockpiled at the temporary stockpiling areas, whenever it is suitable.  Hence, no imported fill will be required.

9.2.5                       Excavated Contamination Materials and Marine Deposit

9.2.5.1                Contamination Soil

A Contamination Assessment Plan (CAP) has been prepared and agreed-in-principle by EPD (Appendix 10-1 of Chapter 10).  It collected historical information and existing site conditions as the basis for land contamination assessment.  The assessment has been conducted at selected sampling hotspots and approximately 39m3 of soil is confirmed to be contaminated at the ex-government dockyard at Canton Road Government Office (see Chapter 10).  Details of the findings are reported in the Contamination Assessment Report.  “Excavation and Landfill Disposal” is considered as the most suitable and cost effective remediation method as none of the contaminants exceed the TCLP limits.  A Remediation Action Plan (RAP), which has been submitted together with the Contamination Assessment Report for EPD endorsement, has detailed the site clean up method.  Details of land contamination assessment and RAP are given in Appendix 10-2 of Chapter 10.

9.2.5.2                Marine Deposits

A summary of the generation of marine deposits and alluvium is given in Table 9-6.

Table 9-6 :  Summary of annual generation of marine deposits and alluvium

 

Year

 

Waste

2004

2005

2006

2007

Total, m3

Marine deposits and alluvium

-

38,400

56,500

-

94,900

 

A Sediment Quality Report was prepared as per the requirements given in the WBTC 34/2002 ”Management of Dredged / Excavated Sediment” [9-19].  The Final Sediment Quality Report has been approved by EPD in 2003.

Based on the Final Sediment Quality Report, field sampling work involving 31 drill holes was carried out during the fourth quarter of 2002.  A total of 92 samples had been collected and tested.  Results indicate that 14 samples contained Heavy Metal compounds registered in Categories M (Material > Lower & £ Upper Chemical Exceedance Level) and H (Material > Upper Chemical Exceedance Level) and 2 samples containing PAH registering Category M.  However, none of the samples were within Category H and exceeding 10 times of LCEL (Lower Chemical Exceedance Level).

These samples were also considered for biological screening as per the requirements given in WBTC 34/2002.  Four of these samples had been proposed for biological screening while the rest of the 14 samples either do not require biological screening (since < 10 times of LCEL) or the sample volume was not large enough.  Biological screening results indicate that all of the four samples failed the biological screening.  The locations of these samples are given in Figure 9-1.

Since the samples (Category M) failed the biological screening, these marine deposits should be disposed at Type 2 confined marine disposal site according to the requirements given in the WBTC 34/2002.  The rest of the marine deposit along the proposed alignment should be assigned for Type 1 open sea disposal.

Given that the whole length of the KSL is around 3.7km, the volume of sediment for disposal will be 26m3/m. According to the approved Sediment Quality Report, the total extent of the sediment requiring Type 2 Disposal is 1,080m, equivalent to 28,080m3 (mainly including WKN and northern tunnel).  The location of marine sediment subject to Type II disposal is illustrated in Figures 9-2-1 to 9-2-3.  The remaining 66,820m3 of marine deposits will be subject to Type 1 open sea disposal.

 

9.2.6                       C&D Waste

About 17,500m3 of C&D waste will be generated throughout the construction works from general site clearance works, tree felling, piling works and earthworks for construction of various structures.  This C&D material has to be disposed of at landfills.

9.2.7                       Chemical Waste

Chemical wastes likely to be generated from the construction activities for the proposed tunnels, station and associated structures will include:

·                    Scrap batteries or spent acid/alkali from their maintenance;

·                    Used paint, engine oils, hydraulic fluids and waste fuel;

·                    Spent mineral oils/cleansing fluids from mechanical machinery; and

·                    Spent solvents/solutions, some of which may be halogenated, from equipment cleansing activities.

 

Chemical waste may pose serious environmental, health and safety hazards if not stored and disposed of in an appropriate manner as outlined in the Waste Disposal (Chemical Waste) (General) Regulation and the Code of Practice on the Packing, Labelling and Storage of Chemical Waste [9-22]. These hazards may include:

·                    Toxic effects to workers;

·                    Adverse effects on air, water and land from spills; and

·                    Fire hazards.

 

It is difficult to quantify the amount of chemical waste as it will be highly dependent on the Contractor’s on-site maintenance practice and the quantities of plant and vehicles utilized. However, it is anticipated that the quantity of chemical waste, such as lubricating oil and solvent produced from plant maintenance will be small and in the order of few hundred litres per month.

9.2.8                       Sewage

Sewage will arise from amenity facilities used by the construction workforce and site office’s sanitary facilities. Night soil from chemical toilets will also be generated.  The sludge needs to be properly managed to minimise odour and potential health risks to the workforce by attracting pests and other disease vectors.

The number of construction workers to be employed on site is not available at this stage, but is anticipated to be about 1,000 staff.  As the workers will be scattered along the proposed alignment, station and work sites, the most cost-effective solution will be to provide adequate number of portable toilets along the alignment to ensure that sewage from site staff is properly collected. Depending on site conditions, land availability and site activities, the locations and number of portable toilets will be determined in the Waste Management Plan (WMP) to be submitted by the Contractor and agreed by EPD.  No adverse waste impact is envisaged provided that maintenance by licensed contractors is conducted regularly.

9.2.9                       General Refuse

The presence of a construction site with workers and site office will result in the generation of a variety of general refuse requiring disposal. General refuse will mainly consist of food waste, aluminium cans and waste paper.

The storage of general refuse has the potential to give rise to adverse environmental impacts. These include odour if the waste is not collected frequently (for example, daily), windblown litter, water quality impacts if waste enters waster bodies, and visual impact. The sites may also attract pests, vermin, and other disease vectors if the waste storage areas are not well maintained and cleared regularly. In addition, disposal of wastes at sites other than approved landfills, can also lead to similar adverse impacts at those sites.

The number of staff (clerical and workers) to be employed for the project is not available at this stage, but is anticipated to be about 1,000 staff.  On this basis, the total refuse generated per day would be about 650kg/day, assuming the refuse generated rate is 0.65kg/head/day.  Provided that the mitigation measures recommended in S9.2.10 are adopted, the potential environmental impacts caused by the storage, handling, transport and disposal of general refuse is expected to be minimal. It is recommended that general refuse should be collected on a daily basis for disposal. Given the small quantity of general refuse, adverse impacts to the operation of the landfills are not expected.

9.2.10                   Recommended Mitigation Measures

The requirements as recommended in ETWB TC 15/2003 Waste Management on Construction Sites and its latest version, and other relevant guidelines, should be included in the Particular Specification for the Contractor as appropriate.

Each tenderer should be requested to submit an outline WMP for tender assessment.  Prior to the commencement of construction work, the Contractor should prepare a WMP to provide an overall framework for waste management and reduction.  It should contain the following key elements:

·                    Waste management policy;

·                    Record of generated waste;

·                    Waste reduction target;

·                    Waste reduction programme;

·                    Role and responsibility of waste management team;

·                    Benefit of waste management;

·                    Analysis of waste materials;

·                    Reuse, recycling and disposal plans;

·                    Transportation process of waste products; and

·                    Monitoring and action plan.

 

Waste management options with less environmental impacts are preferred.  The waste management hierarchy should be as follows:

·                    Avoidance and minimization;

·                    Reuse of materials;

·                    Recovery and recycling; and

·                    Treatment and disposal.

 

This hierarchy should be used to evaluate the waste management options to allow maximum waste reduction and often reducing costs. For example, by reducing or eliminating over-ordering of construction materials, waste is avoided and costs are reduced both in terms of purchasing raw materials and disposing of wastes. Records of quantities of wastes generated, recycled and disposal (locations) should be properly kept.

A trip-ticket system should be established in accordance with ETWBTC No. 21/2002 [9-20] to monitor the disposal of public fill and solid wastes at public filling facilities and landfills, and to control fly-tipping.  A trip-ticket system will be included as one of the contractual requirements and implemented by the Contractor.  The Engineer shall audit the result of the system.

A recording system for the amount of waste generated, recycled and disposed of (including the disposal sites) should be established during the construction phase.  The Contractor should provide training to workers on the concepts of site cleanliness and on appropriate waste management procedures, including waste reduction, reuse and recycling at the beginning of the Contract.

The recommended mitigation measures for other waste types are described as follows.

9.2.10.1             Excavated Contamination Materials and Marine Deposit

Contamination Soil

About 39m3 of contaminated soil is identified (refer to Chapter 10 for details).  Given the small amount of volume, disposal in landfill site is recommended.  Potential landfill sites include SENT and NENT.  Details of the mitigation measures on handling of the contaminated soil shall be referred to Appendix 10 –2.

Marine Deposit

·                    The total amount of marine deposits and alluvium is 94,900m3.  Normally, the contaminated marine deposit will require to be disposed of at confined contaminated mud pits such as East Sha Chau, while the uncontaminated marine and alluvial deposit will require open sea disposal, e.g. in South Cheung Chau, Nine Pin, etc

Possible mitigation measures to handle the contaminated / uncontaminated alluvial / marine sediment are summarized as follows:

·                    All construction plant and equipment shall be designed and maintained to minimise the risk of silt, sediments, contaminants or other pollutants being released into the water column or deposited in the locations other than designated location.

·                    All vessels shall be sized such that adequate draft is maintained between vessels and the sea bed at all states of the tide to ensure that undue turbidity is not generated by turbulence from vessel movement or propeller wash.

·                    Before moving the vessels which are used for transporting dredged material, excess material shall be cleaned from the decks and exposed fittings of vessels and the excess materials shall never be dumped into the sea except at the approved locations.

·                    Adequate freeboard shall be maintained on barges to ensure that decks are not washed by wave action.

·                    The Contractors shall monitor all vessels transporting material to ensure that no dumping outside the approved location takes place.  The Contractor shall keep and produce logs and other records to demonstrate compliance and that journeys are consistent with designated locations and copies of such records shall be submitted to the Engineers.

·                    The Contractors shall comply with the conditions in the dumping licence.

·                    All bottom dumping vessels (hopper barges) shall be fitted with tight fittings seals to their bottom openings to prevent leakage of material.

·                    The material shall be placed into the disposal pit by bottom dumping.

·                    Contaminated marine mud shall be transported by split barge of not less than 750m3 capacity and capable of rapid opening and discharge at the disposal site.

·                    Discharge shall be undertaken rapidly and the hoppers shall be closed immediately.  Material adhering to the sides of the hopper shall not be washed out of the hopper and the hopper shall remain closed until the barge returns to the disposal site.

 

9.2.10.2             C&D Materials

The Project Proponent shall notify CEDD of the estimated spoil volumes to be generated, and liaise and agree with the Public Fill Committee for the disposal of surplus inert C&D materials including good quality rock during detailed design of the project. Wherever practicable, C&D materials should be segregated from other wastes to avoid contamination and ensure acceptability at public filling areas or reclamation sites.  The following mitigation measures should be implemented in handling the waste:

·                    Maintain temporary stockpiles and reuse excavated fill material for backfilling and reinstatement;

·                    For the tunnel section to the north of WKN, stockpile excavated C&D material adjacent to its source for immediate backfill once the tunnel section is completed;

·                    Carry out on-site sorting;

·                    Surplus artificial hard materials should be delivered to Tuen Mun Area 38 recycling plant or its successor for recycling into subsequent useful products;

·                    Due to the relatively small quantities and poor condition of the existing bituminous pavement, it is not recommended that the pavement be recycled for subsequent reinstatement.  Instead, the material may be used for paving of construction access and temporary holding / parking areas;

·                    Make provisions in the Contract documents to allow and promote the use of recycled aggregates where appropriate;

·                    Adopt ‘Selective Demolition’ technique to demolish the existing structures and facilities with a view to recovering broken concrete effectively for recycling purpose, where possible;

·                    Implement a trip-ticket system for each works contract to ensure that the disposal of C&D materials are properly documented and verified; and

·                    Implement an enhanced Waste Management Plan similar to ETWB TC(W) No. 15/2003 – “Waste Management on Construction Sites” to encourage on-site sorting of C&D materials and to minimize their generation during the course of construction.

In addition, disposal of the C&D materials onto any sensitive locations such as agricultural lands, etc. should be avoided.  The Contractor shall propose the final disposal sites to the Project Proponent and get its approval before implementation.

9.2.10.3             C&D Waste

Standard formwork should be used as far as practicable in order to minimise the arising of C&D materials.  The use of more durable formwork or plastic facing for the construction works should be considered.  Use of wooden hoardings should also be avoided, as in other railway projects by the Project Proponent.  Metal hoarding should be used to enhance the possibility of recycling.  The purchasing of construction materials will be carefully planned in order to avoid over ordering and wastage.

The Contractor should recycle as much of the C&D materials as possible on-site.  Public fill and C&D waste should be segregated and stored in different containers or skips to enhance reuse or recycling of materials and their proper disposal.  Where practicable, concrete and masonry can be crushed and used as fill.  Steel reinforcing bar can be used by scrap steel mills. Different areas of the sites should be considered for such segregation and storage.

HKSAR has developed a charging policy for the disposal of waste to landfill. When it is implemented, this will provide additional incentive to reduce the volume of waste generated and to ensure proper segregation to allow disposal of inert material to public filling areas.

9.2.10.4             Chemical Waste

Chemical waste producers should be registered with EPD. For those processes which generate chemical waste, the Contractor shall identify any alternatives that generate reduced quantities or even no chemical waste, or less dangerous types of chemical waste.

Chemical waste should be handled in accordance with the Code of Practice on the Packaging, Handling and Storage of Chemical Wastes as follows. Containers used for storage of chemical wastes should:

·                    Be suitable for the substance they are holding, resistant to corrosion, maintained in a good condition, and securely closed;

·                    Have a capacity of less than 450 L unless the specification have been approved by EPD; and

·                    Display a label in English and Chinese in accordance with instructions prescribed in Schedule 2 of the Regulations.

 

The storage area for chemical wastes should:

·                    Be clearly labelled and used solely for the storage of chemical wastes;

·                    Be enclosed on at least 3 sides;

·                    Have an impermeable floor and bunding, of capacity to accommodate 110% of the volume of the largest container or 20% by volume of the chemical waste stored in the area, whichever is greatest;

·                    Have adequate ventilation;

·                    Be covered to prevent rainfall entering (water collected within the bund must be tested and disposed as chemical waste, if necessary); and

·                    Be arranged so that incompatible materials are adequately separated.

 

Disposal of chemical waste should:

·                    Be via a licensed waste collector; and

·                    Be to a facility licensed to receive chemical waste, such as the CWTC which also offers a chemical waste collection service and can supply the necessary storage containers; or

·                    Be to a re-user of the waste, under approval from EPD.

 

9.2.10.5             Sewage

Adequate numbers of portable toilets should be provided for the workers.  The portable toilets should be maintained in a state, which will not deter the workers from utilizing these portable toilets.  Night soil should be collected by licensed collectors regularly.

9.2.10.6             General Refuse

General refuse generated on-site should be stored in enclosed bins or compaction units separately from construction and chemical wastes. A reputable waste collector should be employed by the Contractor to remove general refuse from the site, separately from construction and chemical wastes, on a daily basis to minimize odour, pest and litter impacts.  Burning of refuse on construction sites is prohibited by law.

Aluminium cans are often recovered from the waste stream by individual collectors if they are segregated and made easily accessible.  Separate labelled bins for their deposit should be provided if feasible.

Office wastes can be reduced through the recycling of paper if volumes are large enough to warrant collection. Participation in a local collection scheme should be considered by the Contractor. In addition, waste separation facilities for paper, aluminium cans, plastic bottles etc., should be provided.

9.3                           Operational Phase

9.3.1                       Types of Wastes

During the operational phase, the station and the associated facilities will generate the following wastes:

·                    General refuse;

·                    Industrial waste; and

·                    Chemical waste.

 

9.3.2                       General Refuse and Industrial Waste

General refuse will arise from the public, station employees and commercial operators within the WKN.  Waste would include food, paper, wood, plastic, office waste, metal containers etc.  The storage and handling of these wastes may give rise to environmental impacts.

Maintenance activities of the station and tracks will generate industrial waste including scrap materials from rail and carriage maintenance, used fluorescent tubes, used welding rods, cleansing materials and discarded electronic equipment.

It is anticipated that waste generated by each of the WKN would be approximately 500kg/day.  A reputable waste collector should be employed to remove general refuse and industrial waste from the stations, separately from chemical wastes, on a daily basis to minimise odour, pest and litter impacts.

9.3.3                       Chemical Waste

Similar to industrial waste, lubricants, paints, used batteries, mineral oil, coolants, and solvents will be generated during the operational phase within the stations and alignment areas.  These wastes may pose significant environmental, health and safety hazard if they are not properly managed.

The requirements given in the Code of Practice on the Packaging, Labelling and Storage of Chemical Wastes [9-22] should be followed in handling of these chemical wastes.  A trip-ticket system should be operated in accordance with the Waste Disposal (Chemical Waste) (General) Regulation to monitor all movements of chemical wastes which will be collected by a licensed collector to a licensed facility for final treatment and disposal.

9.4                           Residual Environmental Impacts

With the implementation of recommended mitigation measures, residual impacts are not anticipated for both the construction and operational phases.

9.5                           Conclusion

9.5.1                       Construction Phase

The quantity and timing for the generation of waste during the construction phase have been estimated.  Measures, including the opportunity for on-site sorting, reusing excavated fill materials (stored in stockpiles) etc, are devised in the construction methodology to minimise the surplus materials to be disposed off-site via the barging facilities in West Kowloon.  The annual disposal quantities for C&D materials and their disposal methods have also been assessed.

Recommendations have been made for the Contractor for implementation during the construction period to minimise the waste generation and any off-site disposal.

9.5.2                       Operational Phase

The types and quantities of waste that would be generated during the operational phase have been assessed.  Recommendations have been made to ensure proper treatment and disposal of these wastes.

 

 


10.                           Land Contamination ASSESSMENT

10.1                        Legislation

Legislation and non-statutory guidance for carrying out the land contamination assessment is provided in the following:

·                    Technical Memorandum on Environmental Impact Assessment Process (TM-EIA) [10-1];

·                    ProPECC PN 3/94 – Contaminated Land Assessment and Remediation [10-2]; and

·                    Guidance Notes for Investigation and Remediation of Contaminated Sites of Petrol Filling Stations, Boatyards, and Car Repair/Dismantling Workshops [10-3].

10.2                        Background Information

The assessment is carried out by reviewing the relevant historical information such as site geological information, ground conditions, aerial photos and site inspection.

Relevant information has been obtained for the underground oil storage tanks in the existing TST Fire Station at the north of Canton Road and the petrol filling station at the intersection of Kok Cheung Street and Pok Man Street (under Skyway House).

All collected information and inspection findings have been reviewed and sampling locations have been selected for evaluating the potential of contamination that might be encountered during the construction period.

10.2.1                   Geology Information

The regional geology of the study area is shown on the 1:20,000 Geological Map, Sheet 11, Hong Kong and Kowloon, from the Hong Kong Geological Survey.

The main rock type within the Kowloon peninsula comprises an equigranular medium grained biotite monzogranite of the Kowloon Granite.  The superficial deposits in the TST area have an embayment of marine sand beach deposits stretching from the shoreline at Salisbury Road up Nathan Road to just north of Mody Road.  The marine sand and beach deposit is also shown to run along and lie below Canton Road with the deposit extending to the west into the area of reclamation.

An alluvial deposit is shown to extend from Austin Road into the project area to below the former typhoon shelter and will underlie the marine deposits in this area.

To the north of the former Jordan Ferry piers the route runs across reclamation areas comprising the former Yau Ma Tei typhoon shelter. The geological map indicates that marine deposits should exist in this area and some marine sands may lie below the old reclaimed areas to the north of the shelter.

10.2.2                   Ground Conditions

Geological sections for the whole alignment are shown in Contamination Assessment Plan (CAP) in Appendix 10-1.  Along Salisbury Road, the upper 2 to 4m of soil (approximately) is fill material.  Below this is a 5m thick marine deposits made up of beach sand deposits.  These deposits comprise typically loose to medium dense sands, which occasionally have silt and clay mixed into the material.  The next 5m is made up of alluvium which comprises a sequence of mixed brown silty and clayey fine to medium sands and gravels.  The lowest stratum recorded (down to a depth of 15m) is predominantly completely decomposed granite (CDG) and moderately to slightly decomposed granite (M/SDG).  M/SDG can be described as a strong to very strong pink mottled grey and black speckled medium grained granite with medium to widely spaced joints.  The average groundwater level recorded at Salisbury Road is about 3m below the surface.

At Canton Road, the CDG layer is approximately 15 to 30m thick lying underneath a thin layer of fill material (1 to 5m).  The CDG layer has its thickest accumulations near Haiphong Road and in the reclamation area.  The average groundwater level recorded is about 1-2m below the surface.  The thickness of top fill layer gradually increases to 20m at the West Kowloon Reclamation Area where the majority of the alignment will be located within this area.  The average groundwater levels recorded are about 6-7m and 3m below ground in West Kowloon Reclamation Area and Tai Kok Tsui respectively.

10.2.3                   Historical Information

10.2.3.1             Reclamation

Review of historical maps and aerial photography indicates that there were several phases of reclamation over the whole alignment.  Across the southern and western Kowloon Peninsula the majority of reclamation was carried out before 1904.  Reclamation in several other small areas along the main TST waterfront was completed by 1982.  The West Kowloon Reclamation was formed as part of the Airport Core Programme and except for the area known as YM6 was completed by 1995.  The remaining area of YM6 reclamation is currently under construction.

10.2.3.2             Industrial Uses

Aerial photographs of 1964, 1974, 1985 and 1995 have been reviewed.  There were industrial facilities (e.g. shipyards, warehouse) along the waterfront of Canton Road in 1964 and 1974.  Most of the shipyards during that period did not have specific precautionary measures to prevent spillage of oil onto the ground.  Aerial photographs reveal that the TST Fire Station and the commercial buildings were constructed during early 1970’s and early 1980’s and the area next to the TST fire station was open storage/car parking area between 1985 and 1995.  The remaining area of YM6 reclamation, the waterfront of the Canton Road Government Office, was the typhoon shelter and the dockyard of the Marine Department.

Further up north was the YMT typhoon shelter and Tai Kok Tsui.  These areas had not been reclaimed in 1985.  In Tai Kok Tsui, the landuses were identified in accordance with street maps from 1996 to 2002 [10-4].  Most buildings were residential uses except two factory buildings located at Sham Mong Road.

The factory building, Tai Kok Tsui Centre (existing Skyway House), located at the intersection of Kok Cheung Street and Pok Man Street was constructed in 1982 and was reconstructed into a commercial building in 2000.  A petrol filling station had been at the ground floor of the building since the factory building was occupied.  Another factory building located immediately north of the Tai Kok Tsui Centre had been occupied since early 1974.

Review of the 1980 survey map revealed that there was ex-shipyard operation located at the south of Chui Yu Road opposite to the Tung Chow Street Park.  It is located at more than 200m to the northeast of the KSL alignment and has been redeveloped into residential premises.

10.2.3.3             Others

The available historical information also indicates that the potential of land contamination caused from accidental spillage or change of land use is unlikely. There is no record indicating the presence of incineration facilities, burn pits or facilities that utilizes high temperature along the proposed alignment. 

10.3                        Site Inspection

A site inspection was conducted on 24 June 2002 to obtain more information regarding the current industrial activities, and to confirm potentially contaminated sampling locations for the intrusive site investigation.  All land lots/ sites within a distance of 300m from the boundary of the alignment have been inspected. 

The landuses along Canton Road are mainly commercial buildings and hotels.  The TST Fire Station comprises of four wings in a Z shape with a 14 storey residential block.  Petrol and diesel filling facilities are provided in the Fire Station.  The area between the TST Fire Station and the Canton Road Government Office is an open space currently occupied by HyD and car/coach parking facilities.

The West Kowloon Reclamation Area is mainly an unoccupied land with newly constructed residential and commercial developments.

In Tai Kok Tsui, most buildings are residential in the vicinity of the alignment.  The petrol filling station still exists at the ground level of Skyway House.  The factory building next to the petrol filling station has been converted to commercial and trading uses with only general mechanical repairs at the ground level, which is paved with concrete.

10.4                        Potential Impacts

The potential land contamination areas are described below.

10.4.1                   Along Canton Road

Canton Road has been developed from past industrial activities to commercial use (e.g. hotel and office etc.) for more than 20 years. The extensive amount of utilities works (e.g. cabling, gas work, road maintenance, etc.) carried out along Canton Road over the years has diminished the possibility of having contaminated soil in the top fill material which is only about 5m thick.

10.4.2                   TST Fire Station to Canton Road Government Office

Information of the underground oil storage tanks inside TST Fire Station has been provided by the Fire Services Department (FSD).  There are two underground tanks located near the shower room block at approximately 60m to the west of the alignment, one for storage of diesel and the other for petrol.  The volume of each tank is approximately 4.55m3.  The tanks have been used for more than 30 years and there is no record on previous spillage or leakage of fuel into the soils and groundwater.  Since bored tunnelling will be adopted along this section for the tunnels, potential impacts on workers during the construction phase is possible, if contaminated soil is present.

The ex-dockyard site at West Kowloon Reclamation, between the Canton Road Government Offices and TST Fire Station, has been an open space since the 1980s.  Potential impacts on workers are possible if contaminated soil is present.

The ex-government maintenance workshop located at the waterfront of the Canton Road Government Office had been operated for more than 20 years before reclamation.  It may have possible residual marine deposits that could be contaminated.

10.4.3                   West Kowloon Reclamation Area

Latest geological information suggests that there are still marine deposits in this area.  Depending on the quality of the marine deposit, different disposal methods would be required.  A sediment Quality Report has been prepared to summarise the chemical test results for marine deposits at various drillhole locations [10-5].  A detailed description on the quantity and quality of the marine sediment that need to be disposed of is given in Chapter 9.  Locations of the marine sediment that require confined marine disposal is given in Figure 9-2-1 for information.

10.4.4                   Tai Kok Tsui

The petrol filling station located at Skyway House is approximately 50m from the KSL alignment.  According to the information provided by the filling station operator, the filling station had been operated since 1982.  There are two underground tanks located at the basement level, one for storage of unleaded gasoline and the other for diesel.  The volume of each tank is approximately 22.75m3.  The tanks are supported on a concrete base with no direct contact between the tanks and the tanks’ storage rooms.  Information on previous spillage or leakage of diesel fuel is not available. 

Although the factory building next to Skyway House is now a commercial and trading premise, it has been an industrial building since 1974.  Information on the industrial activities at that period of time is not available.  However, typical industrial activities would include garment, machinery manufacturing, printing and publishing. These activities may pose potential contamination issues.

The ex-shipyard operation, at approximately 200m from the alignment, opposite to Tung Chow Street Park has been changed to a residential development.  It may have possible residual marine deposits contamination.

10.5                        Contamination Assessment Plan

The CAPs have specified the requirements on the following aspects:

·                    Sampling locations

·                    Depth of sampling points

·                    Sampling methodology for soil and groundwater

·                    Sample size and handling criteria

·                    Analytical parameters & methodology

·                    Quality control

 

The draft CAP was submitted to February 2003 and has been agreed-in-principle by EPD.  The updated CAP based on the current design is shown in Appendix 10-1.

10.6                        Site Investigation

Site investigation works were carried out between 29 October 2002 and 28 February 2003 by the GI Contractor.  Five drillholes proposed in the CAP were excavated and drilled for soil and groundwater sampling. The exact locations and depths for sampling are determined by the on-site Contamination Specialist to suit condition and constraints during the investigation.  All soil and groundwater samples were analysed by a HOKLAS accredited laboratory for all parameters listed in the CAP.  A Contamination Assessment Report has been prepared to summarise the entire contamination assessment programme, investigation procedures and methodologies, the analytical results of soil and groundwater samples, the scope of any remedial work required, and the particular health and safety requirement that may be required during the works.  The Contamination Assessment Report and Remediation Action Plan have been prepared and attached in Appendix 10-2.

10.7                        Assessment Criteria

The results of soil analysis were compared to the Dutch “B” Values as given in ProPECC Note PN3/94”[10-2] which have been adopted as the remediation target in most cases in HKSAR.  However, there is no criterion for dioxins and furans (i.e. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF)).  The USPEA criterion of 1ppb TEQ (1ng/g, Toxicity Equivalent Unit) is therefore adopted as the assessment criterion.  This criterion has been used as the remediation target for residential sites in USA and in another approved EIA study [10-6].

10.8                        Interpretation of Results

A total of 33 soil samples have been collected from 5 drillholes.  All the soil samples collected are within the vertical excavation extent for KSL construction.  Results indicate that all soil samples are below the Dutch B levels except 1 soil sample collected from KSD100/DHE063 (see Figure 10-1), of which the lead concentration exceeded the Dutch B level but within the Dutch C level (Table 10-1).  The analytical results for all soil samples are detailed in Appendix 10-2. 

Table 10-1 :  Summary of soil samples exceeding Dutch B Level

Drillhole reference

Depth

Contaminant

Concentration (mg/kg dry soil)

Dutch B Limit (mg/kg dry soil)

Dutch C Limit (mg/kg dry soil)

Exceedance

KSD100/DHE063

1.5m

Lead

220

150

600

> B and < C

 

The nature and distribution of the contaminated soil samples indicate that contamination is present at discrete hotspot. The finding is supported by the pattern of landuse on this site, which involved ex-dockyard of the Marine Department and typhoon shelter.  Analytical results suggest that contamination is not spatially continuous, and is generally limited in depth.

However, it is Government policy that soils containing contaminants exceeding the Dutch B Levels should be remediated.  Details of the soil remediation method and the disposal criteria of the contaminated soils are described in Section 10.9.

10.9                        Soil Remediation and Disposal

Details of the soil remediation options are given in Appendix 10-2.  A summary is given below.

·                    Only a small quantity of 39m3 of soil (1.0 - 2.0m below ground level) has been contaminated by Lead at drillhole KSD100/DHE063 (Figure 10-1);

·                    Remediation options (including excavation and landfill disposal, solidification and stabilisation, soil-washing, and physical separation) have been investigated with respect to their associated advantages and disadvantages;

·                    Landfill disposal has been recommended, and the contaminated soil has been tested to be acceptable for landfill disposal in accordance with the TCLP testing (Table 10-4); and

·                    Specifications for the remedial works (including disposal methodology, requirements for compliance testing, and the need for protective and safety measures) are given in Appendix 10-2. 

 

Table 10-4 :  TCLP testing results for KSD100/DHE063 at 1.5m

Parameters

TCLP testing results (ppm)

TCLP  limit (ppm)

Cadmium

<1

10

Chromium

<1

50

Copper

<2

250

Nickel

<1.5

250

Lead

12

50

Zinc

<10

250

Mercury

<1

1

Tin

<2

250

Silver

<2

50

Antimony

<2

150

Arsenic

<2.5

50

Beryllium

<1

10

Thallium

<0.08

50

Vanadium

<4

250

Selenium

<1

1

Barium

<2

1000

 

10.10                    Recommendations

The remediation area for contaminated soil should be clearly marked out on site and excavated to an extent of 3.5m radius from the sample location.  Excavation should be undertaken by dedicated earth-moving plant.

The overlaying uncontaminated material should be removed and stockpiled adjacent to the excavation until the specified depth is reached.  The excavated contaminated soils should not be stockpiled on site, but should immediately be loaded onto trucks and taken to the chosen landfill site. All trucks carrying contaminated material should be adequately covered by sheets to prevent dispersion of contamination.

The remediation contractor should have a valid discharge licence from EPD where applicable and should carry out the remediation works in accordance with all relevant legislative requirements and EPD’s Guidance Note.

The remediation programme should be supervised by the on-site Geotechnical Engineer (to be appointed by the Contractor) with at least 7 years experience in contamination assessment or decontamination.  All relevant method statements prepared by the remediation contractor should be reviewed and approved by the Decontamination Specialist before proceeding with the works.

Should the event of the soil contamination following excavation be more extensive than envisaged by the CAP, CAR, RAP, a confirmatory testing will be carried out as follows:

·                    A confirmatory testing will be carried out following excavation at each location, in order to confirm that all contaminated material has been removed.

·                    The confirmatory testing will consist of five samples in each location, situated immediately to the north, south, east and west of each location, and at the base of the excavation.

·                    If the results of analysis are less than the Dutch B Levels, no further excavation will be required.

·                    If the concentrations exceed the Dutch B Level, the area of excavation should be extended, and further confirmatory testing should be carried out following this excavation.  In such case, the area of excavation should be extended by a further 5m radius in the quadrant where the contaminated sample is encountered, or by a further 0.5m depth if the contaminated sample is from the base of the excavation.  This procedure should be followed until no further contamination is encountered.

 

10.11                    Conclusions

A land contamination assessment has been conducted for the project.  Historical information such as site geological information, ground condition, aerial photos has been reviewed.

Five locations have been selected for soil analysis.  Results indicate that only one soil sample (i.e. KSD100/DHE063 at ex-government dockyard at Canton Road Government Office) needs to be remediated.  A total volume of 39m3 (i.e. 0.5m – 1.5m with a 7m diameter) is required to be disposed of at the landfill as a last resort after consideration of other remediation options.  The remediation action plan and specification for remediation works are detailed in the Contamination Assessment Report.

 

 


11.                           Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment

This section of the report outlines the landscape and visual impacts associated with KSL in accordance with the EIAO.  Impacts during both construction and operational phases are assessed.  The assessment includes:

·                    A listing of the relevant environmental legislation and guidelines;

·                    A definition of the scope and contents of the study, including a description of the assessment methodology;

·                    A qualitative review of the four alignment options considered for the KSL, together with a review of the findings of the previous study [11-1] & [11-2] and Project Proposal prepared by KCRC.

·                    A review of the relevant planning and development control framework;

·                    A review of comments on landscape and visual issues received during previous consultation with the public and/or advisory bodies and how these have been addressed in the design;

·                    A baseline study providing a comprehensive and accurate description of the baseline landscape and visual character;

·                    Recommendation of appropriate mitigation measures and associated implementation programmes;

·                    Identification of the potential landscape and visual impacts and prediction of their magnitude and potential significance, before and after the mitigation measures; and

·                    An assessment of the acceptability or otherwise of the predicted residual impacts, according to the five criteria set out in Annex 10 of the TM-EIA.

·                    All potential impacts and proposed mitigation measures are clearly mapped in colour and illustrated with clear annotation and cross-referencing between text, tables and illustrations.  Colour photographs showing baseline conditions, and photomontages and illustrative materials supporting conclusions are provided and the locations of all viewpoints are clearly mapped.  Photomontages at representative locations provide comparison between existing views; proposals on day 1 after completion without mitigation; on day 1 after mitigation, and in year 10 after mitigation.

11.1                        Environmental Legislation and Guidelines

The following legislation, standards and guidelines are applicable to the evaluation of landscape and visual impacts associated with the construction and operation of the project:

·                    Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance, Cap.499. S.16 [11-3] (EIAO) and the Technical Memorandum on EIA Process (TM-EIA) [11-4];

·                    Town Planning Ordinance (Cap. 131) [11-5];

·                    Kowloon Planning Area No. 1 -Tsim Sha Tsui Draft Outline Zoning Plan (OZP) No. S/K1/18 dated 17th October 2003 [11-6];

·                    Kowloon Planning Area No. 20 -South West Kowloon Draft Outline Zoning Plan (OZP) No. S/K20/15 dated 26th March 2004 [11-7];

·                    Shatin Draft Outline Zoning Plan (OZP) No. S/ST/19 dated 16th Jan 2004 [11-25];

·                    Draft Kowloon Planning Area 20 - South West Kowloon (Central Section) Outline Development Plan No. D/K20B/C [11-8];

·                    Draft Kowloon Planning Area 20 - South West Kowloon (Southern Section) Outline Development Plan No. D/K20C/B [11-9];

·                    EIAO Guidance Note 8/2002 [11-10];

·                    Animals and Plants (Protection of Endangered Species) Ordinance (Cap. 187) [11-11];

·                    Hong Kong Planning Standards and Guidelines [11-12] Chapter 10, ‘Conservation’;

·                    Hong Kong Planning Standards and Guidelines [11-12] Chapter 4, ‘Open Space’;

·                    Hong Kong Planning Standards and Guidelines [11-12] Chapter 11, ‘Urban Design Guidelines’;

·                    WBTC No. 25/92 – Allocation of Space for Urban Street Trees [11-13];

·                    Works Branch Technical Circular WBTC No. 25/93, Control of Visual Impact of Slopes [11-14];

·                    WBTC No. 30/2001 – Capital Works or Maintenance Works (including Tree Planting) Within or Adjacent to the Kowloon Canton Railway (Hong Kong) Section [11-16];

·                    ETWBTC No. 7/2002 – Tree Planting in Public Works [11-17];

·                    ETWBTC No. 14/2002 - Management and Maintenance of Natural Vegetation and Landscape Works and Tree Preservation [11-18];

·                    ETWBTC No. 2/2004 – Maintenance of Vegetation and Hard Landscape Features [11-26];

·                    Lands Administration Office Instruction Section D12 - Tree Preservation [11-19];

·                    HYDTC 10/2001 – Visibility of Directional Signs [11-20];

·                    GEO publication (1999) – Use of Vegetation as Surface Protection on Slopes [11-21];

·                    GEO Publication No.1/2000 – Technical Guidelines on Landscape Treatment and Bio-engineering of Man-made Slopes and Retaining Walls [11-22];

·                    SILTech Publication (1991) – Tree Planting and Maintenance in Hong Kong (Standing Interdepartmental Landscape Technical Group) [11-23]; and

·                    Urban Council Publication (Chinese Language Edition 1998) - Champion Trees in Urban Hong Kong [11-24].

11.2                        Scope and Content of the Study

11.2.1                   Project Overview

The rationale for the selection of the Canton Road corridor as the preferred alignment is described and illustrated in Chapter 3. 

The scope of the work, construction methodologies and works sites and works areas for the selected alignment are described in detail, and illustrated with figures in Chapter 4.

In addition to the works described in chapter 4, the proposed airborne noise mitigation measures identified in Chapter 6 would include temporary noise barriers / enclosures to be erected at selected locations along the cut and cover section.  These will typically be 3-4m tall and placed close to the noise sources of individual construction plant items, within the contractors works areas.  They will be moved around within the contractors works areas as construction progresses, to suit the locations of particular noise generation activities. 

11.2.2                   Limits of the Study Area

The limit of the landscape impact study is 100m from the works limit of the Project. The limits of the visual impact studies are the Zones of Visual Influence (ZVIs) of KSL during the construction and operational phases.

11.2.3                   Assessment Methodology – Landscape Impacts

Landscape impacts have been assessed separately for the construction and operational phases of the proposed scheme. The assessment involves the following procedures:

11.2.3.1             Identification of the baseline landscape resources (physical & cultural) and landscape character within the study area

This is achieved by site visit and desk-top study of topographical maps, information databases and photographs (including tree survey information). The identification of potential impacts are based upon the review of the engineering scheme design and construction methods, which have been superimposed over the baseine resources, and detailed tree survey plans.

11.2.3.2             Assessment of the degree of sensitivity to change of the landscape resources / character areas

This is influenced by a number of factors including whether the resource / character is common or rare, whether it is considered to be of local, regional, national or global importance, whether there are any statutory or regulatory limitations/ requirements relating to the resource / character, the quality of the resource / character, the maturity of the resource, and the ability of the resource / character to accommodate change.  The sensitivity of each landscape feature and character unit is classified as follows:

High:

Important landscape or landscape resource of particularly distinctive character or high importance, sensitive to relatively small changes

Medium:

Landscape or landscape resource of moderately valued landscape characteristics reasonably tolerant to change

Low:

Landscape or landscape resource, the nature of which is largely tolerant to change

 

11.2.3.3             Identification of potential sources of landscape impacts

These are the various elements of the construction works and operational procedures that would generate landscape impacts.

11.2.3.4             Identification of the magnitude of landscape impacts

The magnitude of the impact depends on a number of factors including the physical extent of the impact, the landscape and visual context of the impact, the compatibility of the project with the surrounding landscape, and the time-scale of the impact - i.e. whether it is temporary (short, medium or long term), permanent but potentially reversible, or permanent and irreversible. Landscape impacts have been quantified wherever possible. 

The magnitude of landscape impacts is classified as follows:

Large:

The landscape or landscape resource would suffer a major change

Intermediate:

The landscape or landscape resource would suffer a moderate change

Small:

The landscape or landscape resource would suffer slight or barely perceptible changes

Negligible:

The landscape or landscape resource would suffer no discernible change.

11.2.3.5             Identification of potential landscape mitigation measures

These may take the form of adopting alternative designs or revisions to the basic engineering and architectural design to prevent and/or minimise adverse impacts; remedial measures such as colour and textural treatment of building features; and compensatory measures such as the implementation of landscape design measures (e.g. tree planting, creation of new open space etc) to compensate for unavoidable adverse impacts and to attempt to generate potentially beneficial long term impacts. A programme for the mitigation measures has been provided.  The agencies responsible for the funding, implementation, management and maintenance of the mitigation measures have been identified and their approval-in-principle will be sought.

11.2.3.6             Prediction of the significance of landscape impacts before and after the implementation of the mitigation measures.

By synthesising the magnitude of the various impacts and the sensitivity of the various landscape resources, it is possible to categorise impacts in a logical, well-reasoned and consistent fashion.  Table 11-1 shows the rationale for dividing the degree of significance into four thresholds, namely insubstantial, slight, moderate, and substantial depending on the combination of a negligible-small-intermediate-large magnitude of impact and a low-medium-high degree of sensitivity of landscape resource or character.  The significant thresholds are defined as follows:

Substantial:

Adverse/ beneficial impact where the proposal would cause significant deterioration or improvement in existing landscape quality

Moderate:

Adverse/ beneficial impact where the proposal would cause a noticeable deterioration or improvement in existing landscape quality

Slight:

Adverse/ beneficial impact where the proposal would cause a barely perceptible deterioration or improvement in existing landscape quality

Insubstantial:

No discernible change in the existing landscape quality

Table 11-1 :  Relationship between receptor sensitivity and impact magnitude in defining impact significance

 

Magnitude of  Impact

 

Large

Slight*/

Moderate

Moderate/

Substantial

Substantial

Intermediate

Slight/

Moderate

Moderate

Moderate/

Substantial

Small

Insubstantial/

Slight

Slight/

Moderate

Slight*/

Moderate

Negligible

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

 

 

Low

Medium

High

 

 

Receptor Sensitivity

(Landscape Resource, Landscape Character Area or VSR)

*In these instances, “slight” impact significance will only be applied in special situations with justifications, in order to avoid underestimation of the impact.

11.2.3.7             Prediction of Acceptability of Impacts

An overall assessment of the acceptability, or otherwise, of the impacts according to the five criteria set out in Annex 10 of the TM-EIAO.

In addition, the following points should be made with regard to the methodology of the assessment:

·                    It is assumed that funding, implementation, management and maintenance of the mitigation proposals can be satisfactorily resolved according to the principles in WBTC 14/2002 [11-18].  All mitigation proposals in this report are practical and achievable within the known parameters of funding, implementation, management and maintenance. The suggested agents for the funding and implementation (and subsequent management and maintenance, if applicable) are indicated in Tables 11-2, 11-3, 11-5 and 11-6.  Approval-in-principle to the implementation, management and maintenance of the proposed mitigation measures has been sought from the appropriate authorities.

·                    It is assumed that the planned open spaces along the alignment will not be built until after the commissioning of KSL, and thus these open spaces will not be impacted during the construction phase of KSL.

11.2.4                   Assessment Methodology – Visual Impacts

Visual impacts have been assessed separately for the construction and operational phases the project.  The assessment of visual impacts involves the following procedures:

11.2.4.1             Identification of the Zones of Visual Influence during the construction and operational phases of the project

This is achieved by site visit and desk-top study of topographic maps and photographs, and preparation of cross-sections to determine visibility of the project from various locations.

11.2.4.2             Identification of the Visually Sensitive Receivers (VSRs) within the ZVIs at construction and operational phases

These are the people who would reside within, work within, play within, or travel through, the ZVIs.

11.2.4.3             Identification of potential sources of visual impacts

These are the various elements of the construction works and operational procedures that would generate visual impacts.

11.2.4.4             Assessment of the degree of sensitivity to change of the VSRs

Factors considered include:

·                    The type of VSRs, which is classified according to whether the person is at home, at work, at play, or travelling.  Those who view the impact from their homes are considered to be highly sensitive as the attractiveness or otherwise of the outlook from their home will have a substantial effect on their perception of the quality and acceptability of their home environment and their general quality of life. Those who view the impact from their workplace are considered to be only moderately sensitive as the attractiveness or otherwise of the outlook will have a less important, although still material, effect on their perception of their quality of life.  The degree to which this applies depends on whether the workplace is industrial, retail or commercial.  Those who view the impact whilst taking part in an outdoor leisure activity may display varying sensitivity depending on the type of leisure activity. Those who view the impact whilst travelling on a public thoroughfare will also display varying sensitivity depending on the speed of travel.

·                    Other factors which may be considered (as required by EIAO GN 8/2002 [11-10]) include the value and quality of existing views, the availability and amenity of alternative views, the duration or frequency of view, and the degree of visibility.

The sensitivity of VSRs is classified as follows:

High:

The VSR is highly sensitive to any change in their viewing experience

Medium:

The VSR is moderately sensitive to any change in their viewing experience

Low:

The VSR is only slightly sensitive to any change in their viewing experience

 

11.2.4.5             Identification of the relative numbers of VSRs

This is expressed in terms of whether there are very few, few, many or very many VSRs in any one category of VSR.

11.2.4.6             Assessment of the potential magnitude of visual impacts. 

Factors considered include:

·                    Compatibility with the surrounding landscape;

·                    Duration of the impact;

·                    Reversibility of the impact;

·                    Scale of the impact and distance of the source of impact from the viewer; and

·                    Degree of visibility of the impact, and the degree to which the impact dominates the field of vision of the viewer.

The magnitude of visual impacts are classified as follows:

Large:

The VSRs would suffer a major change in their viewing experience;

Intermediate

The VSRs would suffer a moderate change in their viewing experience;

Small:

The VSRs would suffer a small change in their viewing experience;

Negligible:

The VSRs would suffer no discernible change in their viewing experience.

 

11.2.4.7             Identification of potential visual mitigation measures

These may take the form of adopting alternative designs or revisions to the basic engineering and architectural design to prevent and/or minimise adverse impacts; remedial measures such as colour and textural treatment of building features; and compensatory measures such as the implementation of landscape design measures (e.g. tree planting, creation of new open space etc) to compensate for unavoidable adverse impacts and to attempt to generate potentially beneficial long term impacts. A programme for the mitigation measures is provided.  The agencies responsible for the funding, implementation, management and maintenance of the mitigation measures are identified and their approval-in-principle has been sought.

11.2.4.8             Prediction of the significance of visual impacts before and after the implementation of the mitigation measures

By synthesising the magnitude of the various visual impacts and the sensitivity of the VSRs, and the numbers of VSRs that are affected, it is possible to categorise the degree of significance of the impacts in a logical, well-reasoned and consistent fashion.  Table 11-1 shows the rationale for dividing the degree of significance into four thresholds, namely, insubstantial, slight, moderate and substantial, depending on the combination of a negligible-small-intermediate-large magnitude of impact and a low-medium-high degree of sensitivity of VSRs.  Consideration is also given to the relative numbers of affected VSRs in predicting the final impact significance - exceptionally low or high numbers of VSRs may change the result that might otherwise be concluded from Table 11-1.  The significance of the visual impacts is categorised as follows:

 

Substantial:

Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause significant deterioration or improvement in existing visual quality

Moderate:

Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause a noticeable deterioration or improvement in existing visual quality

Slight:

Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause a barely perceptible deterioration or improvement in existing visual quality

Insubstantial:

No discernible change in the existing visual quality

 

11.2.4.9             Prediction of Acceptability of Impacts

An overall assessment of the acceptability, or otherwise, of the impacts according to the five criteria set out in Annex 10 of the TM-EIAO.

In addition, the following points should be made with regard to the methodology of the assessment:

·                    It is assumed that funding, implementation, management and maintenance of the mitigation proposals can be satisfactorily resolved according to the principles in WBTC 14/2002.  All mitigation proposals in this report are practical and achievable within the known parameters of funding, implementation, management and maintenance. The suggested agents for the funding and implementation (and subsequent management and maintenance, if applicable) are indicated in Tables 11-2, 11-3, 11-5 and 11-6.  Approval-in-principle to the implementation, management and maintenance of the proposed mitigation measures has been sought from the appropriate authorities.

·                    It is assumed that the planned open spaces along the alignment will not be built until after the commissioning of KSL, and thus these open spaces will not be impacted during the construction phase of KSL.

11.3                        Planning and Development Control Framework and Public Consultation

11.3.1                   Review of Planning and Development Control Framework

A review has been undertaken of the current planning goals and objectives, statutory land-use and landscape planning designations for the Study Area.

The statutory designations for the Study Area are shown on the Kowloon Planning Area No.1 – TST Outline Zoning Plan (OZP) No. S/K1/18 dated 17th October 2003 [11-6]; the Kowloon Planning Area No.20 - South West Kowloon OZP No. S/K20/15 dated 26th March 2004 [11-7]; and the Shatin Draft Outline Zoning Plan (OZP) No. S/ST/19 dated 16 January 2004 [11-25] (Figures 11-3-1 to 11-3-3).  (The Shatin OZP is included due to the need to extend KCRC’s tenancy of the existing temporary works area at Shek Mun for the duration of the KSL construction period.)

The non-statutory draft Kowloon Planning Area 20 – South West Kowloon (Central Section) Outline Development Plan No. D/K20B/C[11-7] and draft Kowloon Planning Area 20 – South West Kowloon (Southern Section) Outline Development Plan No. D/K20C/B[11-8] illustrate the latest intentions of the Government. 

The proposed West Kowloon Arts and Cultural District is currently zoned as “Other Specified uses” designated for Arts, Cultural, Commercial and Entertainment uses.  It is proposed to be an arts, commercial and entertainment district with distinguished identity, capable of achieving a critical mass and supported by a range of mixed use development (including office, retail, residential, hotel and GIC facilities).  The Government has invited developers to submit proposals.  The selected developer will be invited to develop the entire area, tentatively scheduled for the first phase of development by early 2010.

Whilst it is predicted in this chapter that there will be large temporary impacts to existing open spaces, street trees and amenity areas, the permanent impact will be small and localised.  The predicted permanent impact on open space comprises:

·                    Permanent loss of a small area (approximately 300sq.m.) of public open space at the corner of Canton Road and Kowloon Park Drive.

The permanent loss of this public open space will be partially mitigated by the provision of an attractive public streetscape area in front of the West Kowloon Station building (at least 400sq.m.), with shade tree planting and adequate seating facilities (mitigation measure OM13 in Table 11-3).

There will be no impact on the use of the existing and planned open spaces above the rail reserve.  There will be no restriction on the construction of pergolas, pavilions, store rooms and toilet blocks or other structures normally incorporated in open spaces, nor will there be any restriction on tree planting in the open spaces above the rail reserve.

There will also be no impact on existing mature trees in the site of the Former Marine Police Headquarters as a result of the KSL construction or operation.

On this basis, it is considered that KSL railway proposal would be in general accordance with the landscape planning goals and objectives for the study area. 

Nevertheless, the KSL must be very carefully designed to minimise any potentially adverse landscape and visual impacts on the environment, particularly during the construction period.

11.3.2                   Public Consultation

There have been a number of public consultations on KSL since 2002, with the following parties:

·                    Kowloon City DC (November 2002);

·                    Shamshuipo DC (June and July 2003);

·                    Yau Tsim Mong DC (June 2003);

·                    local hoteliers (August 2003); and

·                    Tsim Sha Tsui Area Committee (August 2003).

The only specific comment on landscape and visual issues raised during these consultations has been comment by Shamshuipo DC on the impacts on Nam Cheong Park.  KCRC have agreed with the Shamshuipo DC that the planting works scheduled to be undertaken by KCRC at the end of the West Rail construction contract will instead be undertaken at the end of the KSL construction contract, so as to minimise abortive planting work and save costs.  Furthermore, at Shamshuipo DC request, KCRC have agreed to provide a toilet block to a quality suitable for long term use as part of the permanent reinstatement works at Nam Cheong Park (this is referenced later in this chapter in mitigation measure OM5 in Table 11-3).

11.4                        Baseline Study

A baseline review has been undertaken of the landscape resources, landscape character areas, zones of visual influence, and visually sensitive receivers.  The findings of the baseline review are presented in Appendix 11-1.

A detailed tree survey has been undertaken within the proposed scheme gazettal boundary.  A copy of the survey is provided in Appendix 11-2.  The findings from the tree survey augment the findings of the review of the landscape resources presented in Appendix 11-1.  The findings of the Tree Survey also assist in the quantification of impacts on existing trees, as described later in this chapter.  The Tree Survey has identified which existing trees are considered to be of high amenity value, according to normally accepted criteria, which are described in the Tree Survey methodology.

11.5                        Landscape Impact Assessment

11.5.1                   Potential Sources of Landscape and Visual Impacts

The nature and extent of the works, works sites, works areas and the construction methodologies are described in detail in Chapter 4.  For ease of reference, the extent of works at ground level, including all contractors' temporary works areas, are shown on all the plans illustrating landscape and visual impacts in this Section.

 

Sources of Landscape and Visual Impacts in the Construction Phase will include:-

 

·                    site clearance works involving the removal of existing vegetation;

·                    construction of site accesses;

·                    excavation works for the cut-&-cover tunnels and station works;

·                    extensive stockpiling of excavated materials;

·                    haulage off-site of excavated materials;

·                    stockpiling of building materials;

·                    temporary traffic/road diversions;

·                    importation and storage of construction equipment and plant;

·                    movable temporary noise barriers / enclosures, 3-4m high, which will be moved around within the contractors’ works areas to suit the location of noise generation activities as site work progresses;

·                    the laying down of utilities, including water, drainage and power;

·                    barging facilities;

·                    contractor’s temporary works areas, including site accommodation and parking areas;

·                    use of the existing KCRC temporary works area at Shek Mun for an extended period from the completion of MOS Rail to the completion of the KSL;

·                    construction of station and entrances at WKN;

·                    construction of above ground features such as vent shafts, E&M plant a short interface tunnel and principal fire-fighting access points; and

·                    night lighting.

 

Sources of Landscape and Visual Impacts during operational phase will include:-

·                    EEP at Canton Road;

·                    YMT Vent Building;

·                    Canton Road Plant Building

·                    Above ground station, entrances and associated facilities at WKN including the fresh-water cooling facility;

·                    Footbridge Link between WKN and existing footbridge FB14; and

·                    Residual impacts from loss of trees during the construction phase.

 

The minimising of potential landscape and visual impacts has been a very important factor in the development of the project design.  During project design development, the physical extent of the works have been reduced as far as possible so as to minimise impacts on existing trees and open spaces, and to minimise the degree of visual impact. There are three areas of public open space that will be affected by the temporary and permanent works.  The following explanatory statements are provided to explain the necessity of the works which affect these public open spaces:

·                    Nam Cheong Park (LR43).  The temporary works area that will temporarily alienate part (approximately 12,000 sq.m.) of Nam Cheong Park is required for the cut-&-cover construction of the tunnel which will connect with the WR at NAM Station. The works area proposed for the KSL is currently being used as a works area under the KCRC West Rail Project (Contract CC403), and the proposed works area for KSL will not take any more land than is currently occupied by West Rail.  Public consultation has been undertaken with Shamshuipo DC on the temporary works area within Nam Cheong Park, as described above in section 11.3.2.

·                    Public Landscape Areas of the HKCC / HKSM / Hong Kong Museum of Art Complex (LR6). The temporary works area which will temporarily alienate part (approximately 2,000sq.m) of Salisbury Garden is required for two reasons. Initially to construct a temporary subway to replace the existing subway that must be rebuilt as part of the scheme. Several alternatives to the temporary subway, including a temporary footbridge across Salisbury Road, have been investigated although the temporary subway is considered to be the scheme with least impact to the public during construction. The second reason for the works area is that this section of works is particularly complicated. Working space is severely restricted by traffic lanes, the pedestrian subway through the site, extensive major utilities, and the MTR tunnels beneath. It is particularly important to provide backup space near the site if extensive delays are to be avoided and construction risk is to be minimised. The Salisbury Gardens site is the only available location where such a works area could be established in this area.  Without this site there will be significant risk of prolonged disruption in this area. The size of the works area has now been reduced since the draft EIA to minimise the extent of impact on the waterfront and surrounding facilities.

·                    Public Open Space at corner of Canton Road and Kowloon Park Drive (LR54).  The Canton Road Plant Building that will permanently alienate approximately 300sq.m. of public open space at the corner of Kowloon Park Drive and Canton Road will house an Emergency Evacuation stair and an Emergency Access Stair and Lift. This building is essential to the safety strategy for the KSL south section. The building also houses stair pressurisation and fire suppression facilities which are essential features of such a building.  The footprint occupied by the building has been reduced to an absolute minimum. The location of the building is dictated by physical constraints on all sides: the rail tunnels to the west; the foundations of the Kowloon Park Drive flyover to the north and east; and the China HK Centre building to the south. In addition maximum clearance has been provided to the China HK Centre building in order to provide sufficient space for evacuating  passengers in the event of a tunnel emergency. Taking into consideration all of these constraints means that the space left around the building is too small to permit reprovision of public open space.  However, the appearance of the building will be softened by climbing plants and also there will be sufficient space to plant some compensatory trees and tall shrubs in locations where they will not block traffic sightlines (mitigation measure OM12 in Table 11-3).  In addition, the permanent loss of public open space will be partially mitigated by the provision of an attractive public streetscape area in front of the West Kowloon Station building (at least 400sq.m.)with shade planting and adequate seating facilities (mitigation measure OM13 in Table 11-3).

11.5.2                   Nature and Magnitude of Landscape Change Before Mitigation in Construction Phase

The magnitude of the impacts, before implementation of mitigation measures, on the landscape resources and landscape character areas that would occur in the construction phase are described below and tabulated in Table 11-4.  Only those resources and character areas that are impacted are listed.  All impacts are adverse unless otherwise stated.  There are no impacts on any Champion trees in the Landscape Study Area.  The distribution of impacts upon existng trees (including trees with high amenity value) is shown on Figure 11.5.1.

 

LR6:    Public Landscape Areas of the HKCC / HKSM / Hong Kong Museum of Art Complex.

There would be a large change to Salisbury Garden due to the temporary contractors / RSS site offices and temporary traffic arrangements that would temporarily alienate approximately 2,000 m2 of public landscape area.

LR7:    Trees within the HKCC / HKSM / Hong Kong Museum of Art complex.

There would be impact on approximately 32 trees, of which 9 have a high amenity value.  However, most of the trees are capable of being transplanted.

LR8:    Trees/ Planting along Salisbury Road.

There would be impact on approximately 17 street trees (of which approximately 4 have a high amenity value) due to the cut-&-cover construction techniques and temporary traffic arrangements.  However, most of the trees are capable of being transplanted.

LR16: Trees along Canton Road (From Salisbury Road to Kowloon Park Drive)

There would be impact on approximately 12 semi-mature street trees (none of which have a high amenity value) along Canton Road, caused by cut-&-cover construction techniques and temporary traffic arrangements. All of these trees are capable of being transplanted. 

LR25: Trees along Canton Road (From China Hong Kong City to Austin Road)

There would be impact on approximately 36 trees (of which approximately 7 have a high amenity value) caused by cut-&-cover construction techniques associated with WKN station and temporary traffic arrangements along Canton Road. Some of these trees are capable of being transplanted. 

LR26: Trees at WKCD Development Area north of Canton Road Fire Station

There would be impact on approximately 11 trees (of which approximately 1 has a high amenity value) caused by cut-&-cover construction of the tunnel which bisects this site. 

LR31: Trees along Wui Cheung Road

There would be impact on approximately 41 young/ semi-mature trees along Wui Cheung Road and approximately 7 young/ semi-mature trees along the southern boundary within the City Golf Club, caused by cut-&-cover construction of the tunnel and works for WKN Station at this section of the route.  In addition, the works area A3 occupies a large area to the west of the proposed alignment.  This will affect an additional 30 trees. Most of these trees are capable of being transplanted.  Approximately 10 of the affected trees are high amenity value. 

LR32: Trees/ Planting at Bus Station on Wui Cheung Road

There would be impact on approximately 70 trees (of which approximately 10 have a high amenity value) in this area, caused by cut-&-cover construction of the tunnel and works for WKN Station entrance construction and associated works areas.  In addition there would be construction impact on approximately 7 young/ semi-mature trees located within the adjacent golf driving range, adjacent to the bus station, on the eastern boundary. Most of these trees are capable of being transplanted.   

LR33: Trees along Jordan Road

There would be impact on approximately 110 trees (of which approximately 15 have a high amenity value) caused by the cut-&-cover construction techniques within the works area for the main tunnel. Further construction impact will affect approximately 20 trees during the construction of modified subways at the j/o Ferry Street and Jordan Road. Most of these trees are capable of being transplanted.   

LR35: Existing Trees at the Planned Local Open Space at Man Wui Street

There would be impact on approximately 8 young / semi-mature trees (of which approximately 2 have a high amenity value) caused by cut-&-cover construction techniques within the works area for the main tunnel and the temporary dismantling of the footbridge/ ramp on the northern side of Jordan Road. Most of these trees are capable of being transplanted.   

LR40: Trees/ Vegetation at the Planned District Open Space west of Man Cheong Street

There would be impact on approximately 25 trees (of which none have a high amenity value). The tunnel alignment bisects the site with works area occupying the remainder of site unaffected by cut-&-cover construction techniques. Most of these trees are capable of being transplanted.   

LR43: Nam Cheong Park Temporary Public Open Space  

There will be impact on Nam Cheong Park as an area of approximately 12,000 m2 [PS1] of it will be occupied for works area.  In addition, an area of the park will be required for the cut-&-cover construction of the tunnel which will connect with the WR at NAM Station. The works area proposed for the KSL is currently being used as a works area under the KCRC West Rail Project (Contract CC403). 

LR44: Trees within the Nam Cheong Park Temporary Public Open Space

There would be impact on approximately 7 recently planted trees (of which none have a high amenity value) within the park as a result of cut-&-cover construction of the main tunnel and the location of the works area within the Park.  This area is also planned to receive new tree planting as part of the mitigation measures implemented under the KCRC West Rail Project (Contract CC403). However, agreement has been reached between KCRC, LCSD and DLO to postpone the planned tree planting within this area of the park to prevent abortive tree planting and unnecessary tree impacts by the KSL project.  The mitigation planting will instead be undertaken as part of the mitigation measures implemented under the KSL project (as part of mitigation measure OM5 in table 11-3). 

LR45: Vegetation along West Kowloon Highway corridor

There would be some impact on grassland and approximately 700 young trees (of which approximately 4 have a high amenity value, and approximately 125 are ‘undersized’) caused by cut-&-cover construction techniques and stockpiling of excavated materials along the section from Cherry Street to NAM Station. Most of these trees are capable of being transplanted.   

LR46: Topsoil in all planted areas

There would be impact on all the soil in the above mentioned areas. 

LR52: Temporary Landscape at West Kowloon Cultural District

There would be impact on a small portion of the temporary landscape area due to the proposed barging point, however no trees are affected. 

LR53: Landscape Forecourt of Olympian City 2 Development

There would be large temporary impact on approximately 3,500 sq.m. of the forecourt due to construction access to Cherry street culvert, utilities and drainage diversions, temporary storage area, and temporary traffic management.  There would be impact on approximately 60 trees (of which approximately 25 have a high amenity value). Most of the trees are capable of being transplanted. 

LR54: Public Open Space at Corner of Canton Road and Kowloon Park Drive

The whole open space will be affected by the construction of the Canton Road Plant Building which will occupy most of the area currently occupied by the open space. All 12 trees (of which 6 are of high amenity value) will be affected.  All are capable of transplanting, although the largest trees will suffer some loss of form and amenity value during the transplanting process.

 

In addition to the above impacts on landscape Resources, there would be large magnitude of change on landscape character areas LCA2, LCA3, LCA15, LCA19, LCA20, LCA21, LCA24, LCA26, LCA28 and LCA30 due to the excavation works, temporary works areas, extensive stockpiling of excavated materials, temporary traffic diversions and associated impacts on trees as described above.

There would be intermediate magnitude of change on landscape character areas LCA17 due to impacts on street trees, and LCA29 due to utilities diversions in front of Olympian City 2 development.

There would be small magnitude of change on landscape character area LCA8 due to construction activity in the road carriageways.

There would be small magnitude of change on landscape character area LCA31 due to the extended use of the existing KCRC temporary Works Area at Shek Mun, rather than handing the site back to Government at the end of the MOS Rail construction period, as a hydroseeded grass area awaiting future development by others.

There would be negligible magnitude of change on all the remaining landscape character areas.

11.5.3                   Nature and Magnitude of Landscape Change Before Mitigation in Operational Phase

The magnitude of the change, before implementation of mitigation measures, on the landscape resources that would occur in the operational phase would be the same as the impacts described above for construction phase impacts.  The impacts are tabulated in Table 11-4.

The magnitude of the change, before implementation of mitigation measures, on the landscape character areas that would occur in the operational phase are described below and tabulated in Table 11-4. 

There would be intermediate magnitude of change, before mitigation, on the following landscape character areas:

·                    LCA15 due to the Canton Road Plant Building and the residual effect of loss of trees during construction stage;

·                    LCA17 due to the residual effect of loss of trees during construction stage;

·                    LCA28 due to residual effect of loss of trees during construction stage;

·                    LCA30 due to the residual impacts on the landform and trees in Nam Cheong Park.

There would be small magnitude of change on the following landscape character areas:

·                    LCA2, LCA3, LCA20, and LCA24 due to residual effects of the loss of trees during the construction phase;

·                    LCA26 due to YMT Vent Building and residual effect of loss of trees during construction stage.

There would be negligible magnitude of impact on all the remaining landscape character areas.

11.5.4                   Recommended Landscape and Mitigation Measures in Construction and Operational Phases

The proposed landscape mitigation measures in the construction and operational phases are listed in Tables 11-2 and 11-3 below, together with an indication of Funding, Implementation, Management and Maintenance agencies.  The mitigation measures are illustrated in Figures 11-5-11 to 11-5-23.

Table 11-2 :  Proposed construction phase landscape mitigation measures

ID No.

Landscape Mitigation Measure

Funding Agency

Implementation Agency

CM1

The construction area and contractor’s temporary works areas shall be minimised to avoid impacts on adjacent landscape.  Existing trees within contractor’s temporary works areas shall be retained and protected where practical(see also CM5 and CM6). 

KCRC

KCRC

CM2

Regular checks shall be carried out to ensure that the work site boundaries are not transgressed, hoardings are properly maintained and that no damage is being caused to the surrounding landscape areas.

KCRC

KCRC

CM3

Topsoil, where identified, shall be stripped and stored for re-use in the construction of the soft landscape works, where practical. The Contract Specifications shall include for identification, storage and reuse of topsoil as appropriate.  Under the Specification, the Contractor shall be required to identify at the commencement of the contract any existing topsoil for preservation, storage and re-use, for comment and approval by the Engineer.

KCRC

KCRC

CM4

The potential for soil erosion shall be reduced by minimising the extent of vegetation disturbance on site and by providing a protective cover (e.g. plastic sheeting or a grass cover established by hydroseeding) over newly exposed soil.

KCRC

KCRC

CM5

All works shall be carefully designed to minimise impacts on existing trees. All retained trees shall be recorded photographically at the commencement of the contract, and carefully protected during construction by fencing them off from the rest of the works.  A detailed Tree Protection Specification shall be provided in the Contract Specifications.  Under this specification, the Contractor shall be required to submit, for approval, a detailed Working Method Statement for the protection of trees prior to undertaking any works adjacent to all retained trees, including trees in contractor’s works areas. The project proponent shall review the site works in order to maximize the preservation of the trees of high amenity value in situ.  A total of no more than 1200 trees shall be affected (i.e. felled or transplanted) by the works, of which no more than 105 shall be of high amenity value.

KCRC

KCRC

CM6

The project proponent shall maximize the transplantation of trees of high amenity value if preservation in situ is not feasible.  A detailed Tree Transplanting Specification shall be provided in the Contract Specifications, if applicable.  Sufficient time for necessary tree root and crown preparation periods prior to moving the trees shall be allowed in the project programme. Precise numbers of trees to be retained, transplanted and felled shall be determined and agreed separately with Government during the Tree Felling Application process under ETWBTC 14/2002. (See also OM2 and OM3).  However, a minimum of 80% of the affected trees of high amenity value shall be transplanted.

Destination locations for the transplants and arrangement for transplantation shall be resolved and agreed with relevant department in advance.  Potential destination locations include:

·         Roadside landscape areas in West Kowloon;

·         Vacant lots in West Kowloon zoned for development as public open space; and

·         Existing public open spaces.

If potential destination locations cannot be found by the time the trees are removed from site, they will be located to a holding nursery until destination locations are found.  If no locations outside the project area can be found, they will be stored in the holding nursery for the duration of the contract and transplanted back into the project area at the end of the project.

KCRC

KCRC

CM7

Large temporary stockpiles of excavated material shall be covered with visually unobtrusive sheeting (in subdued ‘camouflage’ colour tone) to prevent dust and dirt spreading to adjacent landscape areas and vegetation, and to create a neat and tidy visual appearance.

KCRC

KCRC

 

Table 11-3 :  Proposed operational phase landscape mitigation measures

ID No.

Landscape Mitigation Measure

Funding Agency

Implementation Agency

Management Agency*

Maintenance Agency*

OM1

Not used.

 

 

 

 

OM2

Compensatory tree planting shall be incorporated along all roadside amenity areas affected by the construction works. Required numbers and locations of compensatory trees shall be determined and agreed with Government during the Tree Felling Application process under ETWBTC14/2002. 

KCRC

KCRC

HyD

LCSD

OM3

Compensatory tree planting shall be incorporated into any public open spaces affected by the construction works. Required numbers and locations of compensatory trees shall be determined and agreed with Government during the Tree Felling Application process under ETWBTC14/2002.

KCRC

KCRC

LCSD

LCSD

OM4

The total number of compensatory trees planted in the project area, for OM2 and OM3 combined, shall be not less than 130% of the number of affected trees.  (Compensatory trees may be either new trees, or existing trees that are transplanted to a holding nursery and then back to the project area).   Compensatory trees shall be at least heavy standard size, unless planting is on a slope, in which case tree size will be the largest practical size given technical restrictions due to slope angle.  Semi-mature size trees shall be used where appropriate at sensitive and prominent locations (e.g. Salisbury Garden).

KCRC

KCRC

HyD or LCSD

LCSD

OM5

Sensitive design and reprovision of the affected areas of Nam Cheong Park incorporating replacement facilities for those provided at present, using materials of a quality suitable for long term use and acceptable to relevant Government departments, plus provision of a new toilet block.

KCRC

KCRC

LCSD

LCSD/ ArchSD (hard landscape works)

OM6

Reinstatement of levels at planned open spaces allowing adequate structural loading for future flexibility in open space design, particularly for landform, earth mounding, typical park structures (pergolas, pavilions, store rooms, toilet blocks etc.) and tree planting works (requiring a minimum soil depth of 1.5m).

KCRC

KCRC

-

-

OM7

Reinstatement of works areas to former condition, subject to applicable Government standards.

KCRC

KCRC

-

-

OM8

Attractive streetscape design shall be incorporated at all station entrances areas and above ground structures, including the provision of tree planting where space permits. All streetscape areas and hard and soft landscape areas disturbed during construction shall be reinstated to equal or better quality, to the satisfaction of the relevant Government departments.

KCRC

KCRC

HyD

HyD / LCSD

OM9

All above ground structures, including Station Entrances, Vent Shafts, Emergency and Firemen’s’ Accesses etc shall be sensitively designed in a manner that responds to the existing and planned urban context, which may include soft landscape measures, to minimise the potential adverse landscape and visual impacts. 

KCRC

KCRC

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere HyD

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere LCSD

OM13

Creation of attractive public streetscape area in front of West Kowloon Station (at least 400sq.m.), with shade trees in paving and adequate seating facilities, as partial mitigation for the permanent alienation of public open space at corner of Canton Road and Kowloon Park Drive

KCRC

KCRC

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere HyD

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere LCSD

Note:

*Management and Maintenance Agencies are identified as per ETWBTC 2/2004[11-25]

**Agreement and approval, including precise delineation of boundaries, etc., of the implementation, management and maintenance agencies of the project will be sought from all relevant authorities during the detail design stages of the project.

 

11.5.4.1             Programme of Implementation of Landscape Mitigation Measures

The construction phase landscape mitigation measures listed in Table 11-2 above should be adopted from the commencement of construction and should be in place throughout the entire construction period. 

The operational phase landscape mitigation measures listed in Table 11-3 above should be adopted during the detailed design and be built as part of the main construction works so that they are in place at the date of commissioning of the railway.  However, it should be noted that the full effect of the soft landscape mitigation measures would not be appreciated for another several years.

11.5.5                   Prediction of Significance of Landscape Impacts

The potential significance of the landscape impacts during the construction and operational phases, before and after mitigation, are provided below in Table 11-4.  Only those resources that are impacted are listed in Table 11-4 – resources not impacted are not listed in the Table. 

The landscape impacts for the construction and operational phases after mitigation are mapped in Figures 11-5-1 to 11-5-5. This assessment follows the stated methodology and assumes that the appropriate mitigation measures identified in Tables 11-2 and 11-3 above would be implemented, and that the full effect of the soft landscape mitigation measures would be realised after ten years.  Photomontages of the proposed development are presented in Figures 11-5-31 to 11-5-44.

11.5.5.1             Construction Phase Landscape Impacts

Residual impacts on landscape resources in the construction phase are mapped in Figure 11-5-1. Residual impacts on landscape character areas in the construction phase are mapped in Figures 11-5-3 and 11-5-4 and listed below.

Residual adverse landscape impacts of substantial significance in the construction phase that will be experienced by the landscape resources and landscape character zones are listed below.  These impacts are indicated in the Table 11-4.

·                    LR6:  Public Landscape Area at the Cultural Centre/ Space Museum/ Hong Kong Museum of Art complex

·                    LR43:             Nam Cheong Park Temporary Public Open Space

·                    LR53: Landscape Forecourt at Olympian City 2 development

·                    LCA2: Salisbury Road Character Area

·                    LCA3:  TST Promenade Area

·                    LCA15: Canton Road (Southern section) Character Area

·                    LCA30: Nam Cheong Park Character Area.

·                    LR54: Public Open Space at Corner of Canton Road and Kowloon Park Drive

Residual adverse impacts of moderate significance in the construction phase that will be experienced by the landscape resources and landscape character areas are listed below. 

·                    LR7:  Trees within Cultural Centre/ Space Museum/ Hong Kong Museum of Art complex

·                    LR16:             Trees along Canton Road (From Salisbury Road to Kowloon Park Drive)

·                    LR25:             Trees along Canton Road (From China Hong Kong City to Austin Road)

·                    LR31:  Trees along Wui Cheung Road.

·                    LR40: Trees/ Vegetation at the Planned District Open Space west of Man Cheong Street

·                    LR45: Vegetation along West Kowloon Highway corridor

·                    LCA19: West Kowloon Reclamation Character Area

·                    LCA20: Wui Cheung Road Character Area.

·                    LCA21: City Golf Club Character Area

·                    LCA23: Wui Cheung/ Austin Road West Character Area.

·                    LCA24: Jordan Road Character Area.

·                    LCA28: West Kowloon Highway Character Area

·                    LCA29: Olympian City High Rise Residential/ Commercial Character Area

All other residual adverse impacts in the construction phase will be of slight or insubstantial significance.

11.5.5.2             Operational Phase Landscape Impacts

Residual landscape impacts on landscape resources in the operational phase are mapped in Figure 11-5-2.  Residual landscape impacts on landscape character areas in the operational phase are mapped in Figure 11-5-5 and listed below. 

All residual adverse landscape impacts in the operational phase will be of insubstantial significance, with the exception of the impacts on the Public Open Space at the corner of Canton Road and Kowloon Park Drive (LR54), where an adverse impact of moderate significance is anticipated due to the permanent alienation of approximately 300sq.m. of public open space and 12 trees (including 6 of high amenity value) due to the proposed Canton Road Plant Building.

 


Table 11-4 :  Significance of landscape impacts in the construction and operational Phases (Note: All impacts adverse unless otherwise noted.  Only those resources or character areas that are impacted are listed in the table – resources not impacted are not listed.)

 

Landscape Resource /

Landscape Character

Sensitivity to Change

(Low, Medium, High)

Magnitude of Change     before Mitigation        (Negligible, Small, Intermediate, Large)

Impact Significance Threshold BEFORE Mitigation 

(Insubstantial, Slight, Moderate, Substantial)

Recommended Mitigation Measures

Residual Impact Significance Threshold     AFTER Mitigation  

(Insubstantial, Slight, Moderate, Substantial)

 

Id. No.

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

Operation

 

 

 

 

Construction

Operation

Construction

Operation

 

 

DAY 1

YEAR 10

 

Part 1 – Physical Landscape Resources (Topography, Vegetation, Soil, Open Space, Special Features, etc)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LR6

Public Landscape Area at the Cultural Centre/ Space Museum/ Hong Kong Museum of Art complex

High

Large

Small

Substantial

Moderate

CM2,CM5, OM3,

Substantial

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR7

Trees within the Cultural Centre/ Space Museum/ Hong Kong Museum of Art complex

High

Large

Large

Substantial

Substantial

CM2,CM5, OM3

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR8

Trees/ Planting along Salisbury Road

Medium

Large

Small

Moderate

Moderate

CM2,CM5, OM2

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR16

Trees along Canton Road (from Salisbury Road to Kowloon Park Drive)

High

 

Large

 

Large

 

Substantial

 

Substantial

 

CM1,CM2,CM5, CM6,OM2,OM8

 

 

Moderate

 

 

Slight

 

 

Insubstantial

 

 

 

LR25

Trees along Canton Road ( from China Hong Kong City to Austin Road)

High

 

Large

 

Large

 

Substantial

 

Substantial

 

CM1, CM2, CM5, CM6, OM2

Moderate

 

 

Slight

 

Insubstantial

 

 

 

LR26

Trees at WKCD Development Area north of Canton Road Fire Station

High

Intermediate

Intermediate

Moderate

Moderate

CM1, CM2, CM5, CM6,  OM7

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR31

Trees along Wui Cheung Road

Medium

Intermediate

Intermediate

Moderate

Moderate

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM5, CM6, OM2, OM7

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR32

Trees / Planting at Bus Station on Wui Cheung Road

Medium

Large

Large

Moderate

Moderate

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM5, CM6, OM7, OM8

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR33

Trees along Jordan Road

Medium

Intermediate

Intermediate

Moderate

Moderate

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM5, CM6, OM2, OM8

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR35

Trees at the Planned Local Open Space at Man Wui Street

Medium

Small

Small

Slight

Slight

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM6, OM3,  OM7, OM8

Slight

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR40

Trees/ vegetation at the Planned District Open Space west of  at Man Cheong Street

Low

Large

Large

Moderate

Moderate

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, OM7

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR43

Nam Cheong Park Temporary Open Space 

High

Large

Large

Substantial

Substantial

CM1,CM2, OM5

Substantial

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR44

Trees in Nam Cheong Park Temporary Open Space 

Medium

Small

Small

Slight

Slight

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, OM3, OM5, OM6

Slight

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

 

LR45

Vegetation along West Kowloon Highway corridor

 

Medium

Large

Large

Substantial

Moderate

CM1,CM2,CM3,CM4, CM5,CM6, ,OM2, OM7

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LR46

Topsoil in all planted areas

Low

Intermediate

Intermediate

Slight

Slight

CM3

Slight

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

LR52

Temporary landscape at WKCD

Low

Small

Small

Slight

Slight

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, OM3, OM5, OM6

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

LR53

Landscape Forecourt of Olympian City 2 Development

High

Large

Large

Substantial

Substantial

CM1,CM2,CM3, CM5,CM6, OM2, OM3, OM6, OM7, OM8

Substantial

Slight

Insubstantial

LR54

Public Open Space at Corner of Canton Road and Kowloon Park Drive

High

Large

Large

Substantial

Substantial

OM8, OM9

Substantial

Moderate

Moderate

Part 2 – Landscape Character Areas

LCA2

Salisbury Road Character Area

High

Large

Small

Substantial

Slight

CM1,CM2,CM5, CM6, OM2

Substantial

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LCA3

TST Waterfront Area

High

Large

Small

Substantial

Slight

CM1,CM2,CM3,CM5, CM6, OM3

Substantial

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LCA8

Kowloon Park Drive Character Area

Medium

Small

Negligible

Slight

Insubstantial

CM1,CM2,CM5, CM6, OM2

Slight

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

 

LCA15

Canton Road (Southern section) Character Area

High

 

Large

 

Intermediate

Substantial

 

Moderate

 

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, OM2, OM8,

Substantial

 

Slight

 

Insubstantial

 

 

LCA17

Canton Road (Northern section) Character Area

Medium

Intermediate

Intermediate

Slight

Moderate

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, OM5, CM6, CM7, OM2

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LCA19

West Kowloon Reclamation Character Area

Construction – Low

Operation – High

Large

Negligible

Moderate

Insubstantial

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, CM7, OM7

Moderate

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

 

LCA20

Wui Cheung Road Character Area

Medium

Large

Small

Moderate

Slight

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, CM7, OM2, OM3

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LCA21

City Golf Club Character Area

Low

Large

Negligible

Moderate

Insubstantial

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5,CM6, CM7, OM7, OM9

Moderate

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

 

LCA24

Jordan Road Character Area

Medium

Large

Small

Moderate

Slight

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, CM7, OM3, OM8, OM9

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LCA26

Lai Cheung / Sham Mong Road Character Area

Medium

Large

Small

Moderate

Slight

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, CM7, OM3, OM8, OM9

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LCA28

West Kowloon Highway Character Area

Low

Large

Intermediate

Moderate

Slight

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, CM7, OM7, OM9

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LCA29

Olympian City High Rise Residential/ Commercial Character Area.

High

Intermediate

Small

Moderate

Slight

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM5, CM6, , OM2, OM3, OM6, OM7, OM8

Moderate

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LCA30

Nam Cheong Park Character Area

High

Large

Intermediate

Substantial

Moderate

CM1, CM2, CM3, CM4, CM5, CM6, CM7, OM3, OM5, OM7

Substantial

Slight

Insubstantial

 

LCA31

Shek Mun Landscape Character Area

Medium

Small

N/A

Slight

N/A

CM1

Slight

N/A

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

.


11.6                        Visual Impact Assessment

11.6.1                   Potential Sources of Visual Impacts

The potential sources of landscape and visual impacts are described above in section 11.5.1.

11.6.2                   Visual Mitigation Measures

The proposed visual mitigation measures in the construction and operational phases are summarised in Tables 11-5 and 11-6 below, together with an indication of Funding, Implementation, Management and Maintenance agencies.  The mitigation measures are illustrated in Figures 11-5-11 to 11-5-23.

 

Table 11-5 :  Proposed construction phase visual mitigation measures

ID No.

Visual Mitigation Measure

Funding Agency

Implementation Agency

CM1

The construction area and contractor’s temporary works areas shall be minimised to avoid impacts on adjacent landscape.  Existing trees within contractor’s temporary works areas should be retained and protected where practical (see also CM5 and CM6).

KCRC

KCRC

CM2

Regular checks shall be carried out to ensure that the work site boundaries are not transgressed, hoardings are properly maintained and that no damage is being caused to the surrounding landscape areas.

KCRC

KCRC

CM4

The potential for soil erosion shall be reduced by minimising the extent of vegetation disturbance on site and by providing a protective cover (e.g. plastic sheeting or a grass cover established by hydroseeding) over newly exposed soil.

KCRC

KCRC

CM7

Large temporary stockpiles of excavated material shall be covered with visually unobtrusive sheeting (in subdued ‘camouflage’ colour tone) to prevent dust and dirt spreading to adjacent landscape areas and vegetation, and to create a neat and tidy visual appearance.

KCRC

KCRC

CM8

Control night lighting and prevent glare to surrounding VSRs by directing all security lighting downward into works sites and works areas.

KCRC

KCRC

CM9

Clean & tidy hoardings shall be provided. Good site practice will be adopted by the contractor to ensure the conditions of the hoardings are properly maintained throughout the construction period.

KCRC

KCRC

CM10

Temporary noise barriers shall be designed to minimise adverse visual impacts on adjacent VSRs

KCRC

KCRC

 

Table 11-6 :  Proposed operational phase visual mitigation measures

ID No.

Visual Mitigation Measure

Funding Agency

Implementation Agency

Management Agency

Maintenance Agency

OM1

Not used

 

 

 

 

OM2

Compensatory tree planting shall be incorporated along all roadside amenity areas affected by the construction works. Required numbers and locations of compensatory trees shall be determined and agreed with Government during the Tree Felling Application process under ETWBTC14/2002.

KCRC

KCRC

HyD

LCSD

OM3

Compensatory tree planting shall be incorporated into any public open spaces affected by the construction works. Required numbers and locations of compensatory trees shall be determined and agreed with Government during the Tree Felling Application process under ETWBTC14/2002.

KCRC

KCRC

LCSD

LCSD

OM4

The total number of compensatory trees planted in the project area, for OM2 and OM3 combined, shall be not less than 130% of the number of affected trees.  (Compensatory trees may be either new trees, or existing trees that are transplanted to a holding nursery and then back to the project area).   Compensatory trees shall be at least heavy standard size, unless planting is on a slope, in which case tree size will be the largest practical size given technical restrictions due to slope angle.  Semi-mature size trees shall be used where appropriate at sensitive and prominent locations (e.g. Salisbury Garden).

KCRC

KCRC

HyD or LCSD

LCSD

OM5

Sensitive design and reprovision of the affected areas of Nam Cheong Park incorporating replacement facilities for those provided at present, using materials of a quality suitable for long term use and acceptable to relevant Government departments, plus provision of a new toilet block.

KCRC

KCRC

LCSD

LCSD/

ArchSD (hard landscape works)

OM6

Reinstatement of levels at planned open spaces allowing adequate structural loading for future flexibility in open space design, particularly for landform. earth mounding, typical park structures (pergolas, pavilions, store rooms, toilet blocks etc.)  and tree planting works (requiring a minimum soil depth of 1.5m).

KCRC

KCRC

Not Applicable (No management required)

Not Applicable (No maintenance required)

OM7

Reinstatement of works areas to former condition, subject to applicable Government standards.

KCRC

KCRC

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere HyD/LandsD/LCSD/ allocatee department as per ETWBTC 2/2004

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere HyD/LandsD/LCSD/ allocatee department as per ETWBTC 2/2004

OM8

Attractive streetscape design shall be incorporated at all station entrances areas and above ground structures, including the provision of tree planting where space permits.  All streetscape areas and hard and soft landscape areas disturbed during construction shall be reinstated to equal or better quality, to the satisfaction of the relevant Government departments.

KCRC

KCRC

HyD

HyD / LCSD

OM9

All above ground structures, including Station Entrances, Vent Shafts, Emergency and Firemen’s’ Accesses etc shall be sensitively designed in a manner that responds to the existing and planned urban context, which may include soft landscape measures, to minimise the potential adverse landscape and visual impacts. 

KCRC

KCRC

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere HyD

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere LCSD

OM10

The Footbridge Link between WKN Station and existing footbridge FB14 shall be designed to the satisfaction of ACABAS. 

KCRC

KCRC

HyD

HyD

OM11

Temporary planting shall be implemented along east side of WKN station structure to provide partial screening and to create a more pleasant pedestrian environment prior to any future property development on the sites.

KCRC

KCRC

KCRC

KCRC

OM12

Tall shrubs and climbing plants shall be planted against the face of the Canton Road Plant Building so as to soften building façade.  Trees shall also be planted in locations around the building where traffic sightlines permit.

KCRC

KCRC

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere HyD

KCRC within KCRC boundary, elsewhere LCSD

Note:

*Management and Maintenance Agencies are identified as per ETWBTC 2/2004[11-25]

**Agreement and approval, including precise delineation of boundaries, etc., of the implementation, management and maintenance agencies of the project will be sought from all relevant authorities during the detail design stages of the project.

 

11.6.2.1             Programme of Implementation of Visual Mitigation Measures

The construction phase measures listed above should be adopted from the commencement of construction and should be in place throughout the entire construction period. 

The operational phase measures listed above should be adopted during the detailed design, and be built as part of the construction works so that they are in place at the date of commissioning of KSL.  However, it should be noted that the full effect of the soft landscape mitigation measures would not be appreciated for another several years.

11.6.3                   Prediction of Significance of Visual Impacts

An assessment of the potential significance of the visual impacts during the construction and operational phases, before and after mitigation, is briefly described below, and listed in detail in Table 11-7.  This follows the proposed methodology and assumes that the appropriate mitigation measures identified in Tables 11-5 and 11-6 above would be implemented, and that the full effect of the soft landscape mitigation measures would be realised after ten years.  Photomontages of the proposed development before and after mitigation are illustrated in Figures 11-5-31 to 11-5-44.

11.6.3.1             Construction Phase

Residual visual impacts in the construction phase are mapped in Figures 11-5-6 and 11-5-7.  Adverse impacts of substantial significance during the construction phase would be experienced by the VSRs listed below.  This primarily because of the cut & cover excavations, extensive stockpiling of excavated materials; temporary works sites and works areas, temporary noise mitigation measures, temporary traffic diversions, the associated removal of trees, either by felling or transplanting, and the obstruction of views arising from hoardings;

C1:       Guests and Workers at Regent Hotel and New World Hotel and Shopping Mall

C2:       Guests and Workers at Peninsular and Sheraton Hotels

C3:       Existing commercial developments along west side of Canton Road (Hotels, Shopping Malls and Offices)

C4:       Existing commercial development along south end of east side of Canton Road (Shopping Malls, offices

C14:    Commercial Development at No.1 Peking Road and Former Marine Police Headquarters and Old Fire Station

C/R2:   Olympian City Development- Site C

GIC1: Visitors and users at Cultural Centre/ Museum of Art/ Space Museum complex and Gardens.

GIC2: YMCA

O11:    Existing amenity area at Man Cheong Street

O14:    Visitors and Park users at Nam Cheong Park

R1:      Planned residential development at the junction of Canton Road and Austin Road

R4:      Man Cheong Street

R6:      Charming Garden residential development

T1:       Pedestrians (including tourists) on Salisbury Road

T3:       Pedestrians (including tourists) on Canton Road

Adverse residual visual impacts of moderate significance would be experienced during the construction phase by :-

C7:      Existing commercial development along north end of east side of Canton Road (Shopping Malls, offices.

C9:       Olympian City Development- Site A

C11:     Commercial developments along Peking Road

O1:      Visitors and park users at Signal Hill and Middle Road Children's Playground

GIC5: Canton Road Fire Station

R3:      Residential developments at Jordan Road

T2:       Pedestrians (including tourists) outside Star Ferry Terminal

 

All other VSRs would suffer either slight adverse or negligible residual visual impacts as noted in Table 11-7. 

11.6.3.2             Operational Phase

Residual visual impacts in the operational phase are mapped in Figure 11-5-8.

After all visual mitigation measures are implemented and have matured over 10 years, there would be no residual adverse visual impacts of any significance.

 


Table 11-7 :  Significance of visual impacts in the construction and operational phases (Note: All impacts adverse unless otherwise noted. Only those VSRs that are impacted are listed in the table – VSRs not impacted are not listed. )

 

Key Visually Sensitive Receiver (VSR)

Degree of Visibility of       Source(s) of Visual Impact (Full, partial, glimpse)

Minimum Distance Between VSR & Source(s) of Impact

Magnitude of Change in View before Mitigation

(Negligible, Small, Intermediate, Large)

Receptor Sensitivity

(Low, Medium, High)  

Impact Significance Threshold BEFORE Mitigation

(Insubstantial, Slight, Moderate, Substantial)

Recommended Mitigation Measures

Residual Impact Significance Threshold AFTER Mitigation

(Insubstantial, Slight, Moderate, Substantial)

VSR Type

 

Construction

 

Operation

& ID.

 

 

 

Construction

Operation

Construction

Operation

Construction

Operation

 

 

DAY 1

YEAR 10

VSRs in Kowloon

C1

Guests and workers at Regent Hotel and New World Hotel and shopping mall

Full

200m

Large

Negligible

High

High

Substantial

Insubstantial

CM2,CM8,CM9, OM2

Substantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C2

Guests and workers at Peninsula and Sheraton Hotels

Full

15m

Large

Negligible

High

High

Substantial

Insubstantial

CM2,CM8,CM9, OM2

Substantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C3

Existing commercial developments along west side of Canton Road (Hotels, shopping malls and offices)

Full

5m

Large

 

Negligible

High

High

Substantial

 

Insubstantial

CM1,CM2,CM8, CM9, OM2, OM8, OM9

 

Substantial

 

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

 

 

 

 

C4

Existing commercial development along south end of east side of Canton Road (Shopping malls, offices)

Full

5m

Large

 

Negligible

High

High

Substantial

 

Insubstantial

CM1,CM2,CM8, CM9, OM2, OM8, OM9

 

Substantial

 

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

 

 

 

C7

Existing commercial development along north end of east side of Canton Road (Shopping malls, offices)

Full

5m

Intermediate

 

Small

High

High

Moderate

 

Slight

CM2,CM8, CM9, OM2, OM8, OM9

 

Moderate

 

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C9

Olympian City Development – Site A

Full

40m

Small

Negligible

Medium

Medium

Moderate

Insubstantial

CM2,CM8,CM9, OM7

Moderate

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C11

Commercial Development along Peking Road

Glimpse

130m

Intermediate

Negligible

Medium

Medium

Moderate

Insubstantial

CM2,CM8,CM9, OM4, OM9

Moderate

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C14

Commercial Development at No.1 Peking Road & Former Marine Police HQ and Old Fire Station

Full

5m

Intermediate

Small

High

High

Substantial

Slight

CM2,CM8,CM9, OM9

Substantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C/R1

MTRC development

Full

200m

Intermediate

Negligible

High

High

Moderate

Insubstantial

CM2,CM8,CM9, OM8,OM9

Moderate

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C/R2

Olympian City Development – Site C

Full

50m

Large

Negligible

High

High

Substantial

Insubstantial

CM2,CM8,CM9, OM7

Substantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C/R3

Olympian City Development – Site B

Full

100m

Small

Negligible

High

High

Slight

Insubstantial

CM2,CM8,CM9, OM7

Slight

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C/R4

Planned C/R development at WKN

Full

5m

N/a

Small

N/A

High

N/A

Slight

OM2, OM7, OM8, OM9, OM10

N/A

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

C/R5

Future West Kowloon Cultural District

Full

50m

N/a

Negligible

N/A

High

N/A

Insubstantial

 OM8, OM9

N/A

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

GIC1

Visitors and users at Cultural Centre/Museum of Art/Space Museum complex & gardens

Full

5m

Large

Negligible

High

High

Substantial

Insubstantial

CM2,CM8,CM9, ,  OM2

Substantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

GIC2

YMCA

Full

10m

Large

Negligible

High

High

Substantial

Insubstantial

CM2,CM8,CM9, OM2

Substantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

GIC5

Canton Road Fire Station

Full

15m

Large

 

Negligible

Low

Low

Moderate

 

Insubstantial

CM1,CM2, CM8,CM9, OM3, OM6, OM7

Moderate

 

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

GIC6

GIC uses on east side of Canton Road

Full

15m

Negligible

 

Negligible

Low

Low

Insubstantial

 

Insubstantial

CM1,CM2, CM8,CM9, OM3, OM6,OM7

Insubstantial

 

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

GIC7

GIC uses on Bowring Street

Full

150m

Small

 

Negligible

Low

Low

Slight

 

Insubstantial

OM2,OM8,OM9

Slight

 

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

 

 

 

GIC8

Planned GIC uses west of Lin Cheung Road

Full

150m

N/A

Negligible

N/A

Low

N/A

Insubstantial

OM2,OM8,OM9

N/A

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

GIC9

Planned GIC uses on Hoi Wang Road

Full

130m

N/A

Negligible

N/A

Low

N/A

Insubstantial

OM2,OM8,OM9

N/A

Insubstantial