Content

 

1.     Introduction                                                                                         

1.1   Purpose of the Manual

1.2   Project Description

1.3   Location and scope of Project

1.4   The Type of Designated Project Covered in the Study

1.5   Possible Impact on the Environment

1.6   Objectives of EM&A programme

1.7   The Scope of the EM&A Programme

1.8   Construction Programme

1.9   Project Organisation

1.10 Structure of EM&A Manual

 

2.     AIR QUALITY                                                                                             

2.1   Introduction

2.2   Air Quality Parameters

2.3   Monitoring Equipment

2.4   Monitoring Locations

2.5   Baseline Monitoring

2.6   Impact Monitoring

2.7   Compliance Assessment

2.8   Event and Action Plan (EAP)

 

3.     WATER QUALITY                                                                                               

3.1   Introduction

3.2   Water Quality Parameters

3.3   Monitoring Equipment

3.4   Construction phase Monitoring

3.5   Baseline Monitoring

3.6   Impact Monitoring

3.7   Action and Limit Level

3.8   Operation Phase Monitoring

3.9   Action and Limit Level

3.10 Event and Action Plan

 

4.     ECOLOGY                                                                                                    

4.1   Introduction

4.2   Ecological Mitigation Measures and Implementations

4.3   Monitoring and Audit for Ecology

 

5.     Waste Management                                                                            

5.1   Introduction

5.2   Waste Control and Mitigation Measures

 

6.     CULTURAL HERITAGE                                                                                     

6.1   Introduction

6.2   Cultural Heritage Requirements for EM&A

 

 

7.     Land Contamination                                                                         

7.1   Introduction

7.2 Potential Areas Recommended for Further Investigation

7.3   Preparation of Contamination Assessment Plan

7.4   Health and Safety

7.5   Mitigation Measures for Land Contamination during Construction Stage

7.6   Potential for Future Land Contamination

 

 

8.     Landscape and visual impact mititation measures        

8.1   General

8.2   Baseline Monitoring

8.3   Construction and Operation Phase Audit

8.4   Construction areas

8.5   Tree Preservation, planting and buffer areas

8.6   Shrub and ground cover planting

8.7   Engineering infrastructure: bridges, desalination plant, pumping stations and water tanks

8.8   Buildings: Extension of existing, halfway houses and rain shelters

 

9      SITE ENVIRONMENTAL AUDIT                                                                      

9.1   Site Inspection

9.2   Compliance with Legal and Contractual Requirements

9.3   Environmental Complaints

 

 

10.   REPORTING                                                                                                

10.1 General

10.2 Baseline Monitoring Report

10.3 Monthly EM&A Report

10.4 Quarterly EM&A Summary Report

10.5 Final EM&A Review Report

10.6 Data Keeping

 

List of Figures

1.1    Location of the Proposed project

1.2    Master Layout Plan of the proposed third golf course

1.3   Project Organisation and Lines of Communication

2.1    Proposed Air Quality Monitoring locations

3.1    Proposed Water Quality Monitoring Locations (Construction phase)

3.2    Proposed Water Quality Monitoring Locations (Operational phase)

4.1    Proposed Ecology Monitoring Locations

4.2    Proposed coral transplantation locations

4.3    Location of coral and seagrass monitioring (Sites D2, D3 and C)

4.4    Control Site for Natural Coral Monitoring

6.1    Area of Construction Works requiring a Watching Brief

7.1    Proposed Sampling Locations for Land Contamination

 

List of Appendix

Appendix A      Implementation Schedule

Appendix B       Sample Data Sheet, Complaint Log and Interim Notification Exceedances

 


1.                        Introduction

1.1         Purpose of the Manual

 

1.1.1               The purpose of this Environmental Monitoring and Audit (EM&A) Manual is to guide the set up of an EM&A programme to ensure compliance with the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) study recommendations, to assess the effectiveness of the recommended mitigation measures and to identify any further need for additional mitigation measures or remedial action.  This Manual outlines the monitoring and audit programme for the construction and operation phases of the “Proposed Extension of Public Golf Course at Kau Sai Chau, Sai Kung” (hereafter referred as “the Project”).  It aims to provide systematic procedures for monitoring, auditing and minimising environmental impacts associated with construction works and operation activities.

 

1.1.2               The environmental laws, ordinances, regulations of Hong Kong and the Hong Kong Planning Standards and Guidelines have served as environmental standards and guidelines in the preparation of this Manual.  In addition, the EM&A Manual has been prepared in accordance with the requirements stipulated in Annex 21 of the Technical Memorandum on the EIA Process (EIAO-TM), issued by the Environmental Protection Department (EPD).  Reference has also been made to the EPD’s “Environmental Monitoring and Audit Guidelines for Development Projects in Hong Kong”.

1.2         Project Description

Background to the Study

 

1.2.1               In mid-1990, the Hong Kong Jockey Club (HKJC) proposed providing a public golf course at Kau Sai Chau as a recreational golf facility, which also has the effect of restoring the land degraded by its use as an artillery range. In late 1995, the first 18-hole golf course was opened to the public, followed by a second 18-hole golf course, driving range and associated support facilities nine months later. Since opening, utilisation of the golf courses has increased considerably.  Utilisation of tee-times is almost 100% on weekends/public holidays and 72% on weekdays when there is good weather (annual average utilisation is 80%). With the two existing courses in heavy demand, the Hong Kong Jockey Club has decided to expand the existing facilities by building a third golf course with supporting facilities.

 

1.2.2               The Project Proponent has therefore decided to make a proposal to enlarge the existing facility into an area that, like the original facility, is a site degraded by former use as an artillery firing range. The Project will provide additional golfing capacity for the existing public golf course on Kau Sai Chau.

 

1.2.3               Historically, Kau Sai Chau was used as a military firing range, and on the Project site there is still visible evidence of this former activity where the thin scrubland cover has been exposed and there has been extensive washout. The existing (36-hole) golf course was the subject of an EIA, although this was before the enactment of the EIA Ordinance (EIAO) (Cap 499) and the project was classed as being “exempted” under the EIAO, i.e. works carried out before the EIAO. This EIA identified environmental mitigation for incorporation into the design and operation phases of the project, including EM&A requirements for construction and operation phases and a “Turf Grass Management Plan”. There has been ongoing EM&A since the course was opened to the public.

1.3          Location and Scope of Project

 

1.3.1               The location of the Project is Kau Sai Chau, Port Shelter, Northeast New Territories east of Sai Kung (Figure 1.1).  The Project is more closely defined as being on the east side of Kau Sai Chau immediately south of the existing public golf course.  The Project site is currently unzoned and comprises an approximately 300 m wide and 1.5 km strip of undulating scrubland. The site is bounded to the west by steep rugged uplands (upto 210 m) and incised valleys and to the south and east by steep rocky coastline. North of the site is the existing Kau Sai Chau Public Golf Course that occupies the northern half of the Island.

 

1.3.2               The Project comprises the following (Figure 1.2):

 

·             Construction of a third 18-hole public golf course on the east side of the island, south of the existing golfing area;

·             A new irrigation lake to collect surface runoff from new 18-hole golf course.  Water stored at the new irrigation lake can also be diverted to existing reservoir for tertiary treatment and recycling;

·             A new desalination plant adjacent to the existing pier serve as an additional irrigation water supply for the new golf course during dry season; and

·             Expansion of existing administration and maintenance buildings.

 

1.4    The Type of Designated Project Covered in the Study

 

1.4.1               The Project is a Designated Project according to Item O1 of Part I, Schedule 2 of the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance (EIAO), since it is an outdoor golf course.  The extension of the existing 36-hole golf course on the east side of Kau Sai Chau can be considered as self-contained for construction activities, but cumulative impact of the three courses for turfgrass management and increased patronage must be considered for the operation phase.

 

1.5           Possible Impact on the Environment

 

Overview of the Project

 

1.5.1               Based on experience gained during the construction and operation of the original course, the current proposal includes design measures to avoid or minimize environmental impacts. Therefore, the golf course design will propose adopting/modifying/enhancing the same approach used in the existing courses in several fundamental areas:

 

·             utilization of treated sewage effluent as a water resource for irrigation.  This theme would be continued for the proposed third golf course;

·             the closed low flow drainage system is designed to collect all of the surface runoff from the proposed proposed third golf course.  This water will be diverted back to the existing irrigation reservoir for recycling as irrigation for the proposed third golf course;

·             no potable water would be used for irrigation purposes.  A desalination plant will be used as a irrigation alternatives during dry season;

·             thorough mitigation measures will be proposed in the EIA and EM&A Manual, and will be sufficient to control any silty water runoff during earthworks of the proposed third golf course.

·             turfgrass sods”, rather than growing from seeds, will be used during course establishment to reduce the period when open earth is exposed;

·             implementation of the turf grass management plan ensures an integrated approach to turf problems and minimal use of pesticides, thereby protecting water quality during the operation phase of the golf course;

·             recycled waste will be used as organic fertilizers used on the golf courses;

·             a buffer zone of 20 m will be adopted generally for sensitive streams;

·             movement of material will be contained in catchments. Wetland landscaping features (lakes/marshes) and the reservoir will be used as construction and operation run-off water retention and sediment settlement areas; and

·             players will use electric golf carts to move around the course (the provision of golf cart tracks rather than walking routes leads to reduced earthworks).

 

1.6           Objectives of EM&A programme

 

1.6.1               The construction and operation impacts resulting from the implementation of the Project are specified in the EIA Report.  The EIA Report also specifies mitigation measures which need to be implemented to ensure compliance with the required environmental criteria.  These mitigation measures and their implementation requirements are presented in the Implementation Schedule (Appendix A).  The EIA recommends that environmental monitoring will be necessary to assess the effectiveness of measures implemented to mitigate potential environmental impacts during construction of the Project.  Regular environmental auditing during construction is also recommended to ensure that potential impacts are adequately addressed through the implementation of the mitigation measures defined in this EIA Report.

 

1.6.2               This Manual provides the EM&A requirements recommended in the EIA Report to ensure compliance with the specified mitigation measures.  The main objectives of the EM&A programme are to:

 

·           provide a database against which any short or long term environmental impacts of the project can be determined; 

·           provide an early indication should any of the environmental control measures or practices fail to achieve the acceptable standards;

·           monitor the performance of the Project and the effectiveness of mitigation measures;

·           verify the environmental impacts predicted in the EIA Study;

·           determine Project compliance with regulatory requirements, standards and government policies;

·           define remedial action to be taken if unexpected problems or unacceptable impacts arise; and

·           provide data against which environmental audits may be undertaken.

 

1.7           The Scope of the EM&A Programme

 

1.7.1               The scope of the EM&A programme is to:

 

·           implement monitoring inspection and audit requirements;

·           implement inspection requirements for mitigation measures;

·           liase with and provide environmental advice (as requested or when otherwise necessary) to construction site staff on the comprehension and consequences of the environmental audit;

·           identify and resolve environmental issues and other functions as they may arise from the construction works;

·           check and quantify the Contractor's overall environmental performance, and remedial actions to be taken to mitigate adverse environmental effects as they may arise from the works;

·           conduct monthly reviews of monitored impact data as the basis for assessing compliance with the defined criteria and to ensure that necessary mitigation measures are identified and implemented, as well as to undertake additional ad hoc monitoring and auditing as required by special circumstances;

·           evaluate and interpret all environmental monitoring data to provide an early indication should any of the environmental control measures or practices fail to achieve the acceptable standards, and to verify the environmental impacts predicted in the EIA;

·           manage and liaise with other individuals or parties concerning other environmental issues which are deemed to be relevant to the construction process;

·           conduct regular site inspections of a formal or informal nature to assess:

-              the level of the Contractor's general environmental awareness;

-              the Contractor's implementation of the recommendations in the EIA;

-              the Contractor's performance as measured by the EM&A;

-              the need for specific mitigation measures to be implemented or the continued usage of those previously agreed;

-              to advise the site staff of any identified potential environmental issues; and

-              submit monthly EM&A reports which summarise project monitoring and auditing data, with full interpretation illustrating the acceptability or otherwise of any environmental impacts and identification or assessment of the implementation status of agreed mitigation measures.

 

1.7.2               This Manual contains the following information:

·             responsibilities of the contractor carrying out the works (the Contractor), the engineer (the Engineer) and his/her representative (the Engineer’s Representative (ER)), the environmental team (the Environmental Team (ET)) and the independent checker (the Independent Checker (Environment) (IC(E))) with respect to the environmental monitoring and audit requirements during the course of the Project;

·             project organisation for the Project;

·             the basis for, and description of the broad approach underlying the EM&A programme;

·             requirements with respect to the construction programme schedule and the necessary environmental monitoring and audit programme to track the varying environmental impacts;

·             details of the methodologies to be adopted, including all field laboratories and analytical procedures, and details on quality assurance and quality control programme;

·             the rationale on which the environmental monitoring data will be evaluated and interpreted;

·             definition of Action and Limit levels;

·             establishment of Event and Action plans;

·             requirements for reviewing pollution sources and working procedures required in the event of non-compliance with the environmental criteria and complaints;

·             requirements for presentation of environmental monitoring and audit data and appropriate reporting procedures;

·             requirements for review of EIA predictions and the effectiveness of the mitigation measures/environmental management systems and the EM&A programme.

1.7.3               For the purpose of this Manual, the ET Leader, who shall be responsible for and in charge of the ET, shall refer to the person delegated the role of executing the EM&A requirements.

 

1.8           Construction Programme

 

1.8.1               The tentative construction programme is starting from Jan 2006 to July 2007.

 

1.8.2               This programme is for the ET Leader to get an initial idea of the projection of the works.  The ET leader shall make reference to the actual works progress and programme during the construction stage to schedule the EM&A works, and the Contractor shall provide the respective information to the ET Leader for formulating the EM&A schedule.  The construction programme and related EM&A schedule shall be updated in the baseline/monthly report submissions as necessary.

 

1.9           Project Organisation

 

1.9.1               The Environmental Team (ET) shall be employed by the Project Proponent to undertake the EM&A works and shall not be in any way an associated body of the Contractor.  The Independent Checker (Environment) (IC(E)) shall be engaged by the Project Proponent to audit the work of the ET.  The IC(E) shall not be in any way an associated bodies of the Contractor or the ET.  The ET Leader and the IC(E) shall have relevant professional qualifications, or have sufficient relevant EM&A experience subject to approval of the Environmental Protection Department (EPD).

 

1.9.2               The ET Leader shall possess at least 7 years of EM&A experience and have the relevant professional qualifications. The IC(E) shall have the same experience and professional qualifications as for the ET Leader.

 

1.9.3               The IC(E) shall be employed by the Project Proponent prior to commencement of construction of the Project.  The role of the IC(E) shall be independent from the management of construction works, but shall be empowered to audit the environmental performance of construction.

 

1.9.4               The Project organisation and lines of communication with respect to environmental protection works is shown in Figure 1.3.

 

1.9.5               The responsibilities of respective parties are as follows:

 

The Contractor

 

1.9.6               The term "Contractors" should be taken to mean all construction contractors, operators and sub-contractors, working on site at any one time. Other than reporting to the Engineer, the Contractors should:

·          work within the scope of the relevant contract and other tender conditions;

·          participate in the site inspections undertaken by the ET, as required, and undertake any correction actions instructed by the Engineer;

·          provide information/advice to the ET regarding works activities which may contribute, or be continuing to the generation of adverse environmental conditions;

·          implement measures to reduce impact whenever Action and Limit Levels are exceeded; and

·          take responsibility and strictly adhere to the guidelines of the EM&A programme and complementary protocols developed by their project staff.

 

 

 

Environmental Team

1.9.7               The ET leader and the ET should not be in any way an associated body of the Contractor. The ET should be led and managed by the ET leader. The ET leader should have relevant education, training, knowledge, professional qualifications and at least 7 years experience in EM&A for environmental management works subject to approval of the ER's Representative and the Director of Environmental Protection (DEP).

 

1.9.8               Suitably qualified staff should be included in the ET, and resources for the implementation of the EM&A programme should be allocated in time under the Contract, to enable fulfilment of the project's EM&A requirements as specified in the EM&A Manual.

 

1.9.9               The ET leader and the ET are employed to conduct the EM&A programme and ensure the Contractor's compliance with the project's environmental performance requirements during construction and operation of the Project. The duties are:

 

·          sampling, analysis and statistical evaluation of monitoring parameters with reference to the EIA study final report on Proposed Extension of Public Golf Course at Kau Sai Chau, Sai Kung  recommendations and requirements;

·          environmental site surveillance;

·          audit of compliance with environmental protection, and pollution prevention and control regulations;

·          monitor the implementation of environmental mitigation measures;

·          monitor compliance with the environmental protection clauses/specifications in the Contract;

·          review construction and operation programme and comment as necessary;

·          review construction and operation methodology and comment as necessary;

·          complaint investigation, evaluation and identification of corrective measures;

·          liaison with Independent Checker (Environment) (IC(E)) on all environmental performance matters, and timely submission of all relevant EM&A proforma for the approval by IC(E);

·          advice to the Contractor on environment improvement, awareness, enhancement matters, etc., on site and

·          timely submission of the EM&A report to the project proponent and the DEP.

Engineer or Engineer’s Representative

1.9.10           The term Engineer, or Engineer's Representative (ER), refers to the organisation responsible for overseeing the construction works or operation of the Project and 'monitoring' the works undertaken by various Contractors, and for ensuring that they are undertaken by the Contractors in accordance with the specification and contractual requirements. The ER should:

 

·              Monitor the Contractors' compliance with contract specifications, including the implementation and operation of environmental mitigation measures and ensure their effectiveness, and other aspects of the EM&A programme;

·              Comply with the agreed Event and Action Plan in the event of any exceedance;

·              Provide assistance to the ET as necessary in the implementation of the environmental monitoring and auditing programme; and

·              Instruct the Contractors to follow the agreed protocols or those in the Contract Specifications in the event of exceedances or complaints.

 

 

 

Independent Checker (Environment)

1.9.11           The IC(E) should advise the ER on environmental issues related to the Project. The role of the IC(E) should be independent from the management of construction and operation activities, but he/she should be empowered to audit the environmental performance of construction and operation.

 

1.9.12           The IC(E) should be employed prior to commencement of construction of the Project. The IC(E) should have at least 7 years experience in EM&A or environmental management. The appointment of the IC(E) is subject to the approval of the ER.

 

1.9.13           The IC(E) should audit the overall EM&A programme including the implementation of all environmental mitigation measures, submissions relating to EM&A, and any other submission required under the this Manual.

 

1.9.14           In addition, the IC(E) should be responsible for verifying the environmental acceptability of permanent and temporary works, and relevant design plans.

 

1.9.15           The IC(E) should arrange and conduct monthly general site inspections of the work site during the construction period. The IC(E) should ensure the impact monitoring is conducted according to the prescribed schedule at the correct locations.

 

1.9.16           The IC(E) should report the findings of the site inspections and other environmental performance reviews to DSD and EPD.

 

1.9.17           Appropriate resources should also be allocated under the Contractor and the ER to fulfil their duties specified in this Manual.

 

1.9.18           The main duty of the IC(E) is to carry out environmental audit of the construction and operation of the Project; this should include, inter alia, the followings:

 

·          review and audit all aspects of the EM&A programme;

·          validate and confirm the accuracy of monitoring results, monitoring equipment, monitoring locations, monitoring procedures and locations of sensitive receivers;

·          carry out random sample check and audit on monitoring data and sampling procedures, etc;

·          conduct random site inspection;

·          audit the EIA recommendations and requirements against the status of implementation of environmental protection measures on site;

·          review the effectiveness of environmental mitigation measures and project environmental performance;

·          on a needs basis, audit the Contractor's construction methodology and agree the least impact alternative in consultation with the ET leader and the Contractor;

·          check complaint cases and the effectiveness of corrective measures;

·          review and audit in an independent, objective and professional manner in all aspects of the EM&A programme;

·          validate and confirm the accuracy of monitoring results, monitoring equipment, monitoring locations, monitoring procedures and locations of sensitive receivers;

·          carry out random sample check and audit on monitoring data and sampling procedures, etc;

·          conduct random site inspection;

·          audit the EIA recommendations and requirement against the status of implementation of environmental protection measures on site;

·          review the effectiveness of environmental mitigation measures and project environmental performance;

·          on a need basis, verify and certify the environmental acceptability of the permit holder's construction methodology (both temporary and permanent works), relevant design plans and submissions under the environmental permit. Where necessary, the IC(E) shall seek the least impact alternative in consultation with Environmental Team (ET) leader and the permit holder;

·          verify the investigation results of complaint cases and the effectiveness of corrective measures;

·          verify EM&A report that has been certified by the ET leader; and

·          feedback audit results to ET/Permit Holder according to Event/Action Plan in the EM&A Manual.

 

1.10         Structure of the EM&A Manual

 

1.10.1           The remainder of the Manual is set out as follows:

 

·                 Section 2 details the requirements for air quality monitoring;

·                 Section 3 details the requirements for water quality monitoring;

·                 Section 4 details the requirements for ecology impact monitoring,

·                 Section 5 details the requirements for waste management;

·                 Section 6 details the requirements for cultural heritage;

·                 Section 7 details the requirements for land contamination;

·                 Section 8 describes the scope and frequency of site auditing; and

·                 Section 9 details the EM&A reporting requirements.

 

1.10.2           The EM&A Manual is an evolving document that should be updated to maintain its relevance as the Project progresses.  The primary focus for these updates will be to ensure the impacts predicted and the recommended mitigation measures remain consistent and appropriate to the manner in which the works are to be carried out.

 

 


2.                        AIR QUALITY

2.1              Introduction

 

2.1.1               This section presents the requirements, methodology, equipment, monitoring locations, criteria and protocols for the monitoring and audit of air quality impacts during the construction phase of the Project. No operation phase air quality monitoring is recommended.

 

2.1.2               The objectives of the air quality monitoring shall be:

 

·             to identify the extent of construction dust impacts on sensitive receivers;

·             to determine the effectiveness of mitigation measures to control fugitive dust emission from activities during construction phase;

·             to audit the compliance of the Contractor with regard to dust control, contract conditions and the relevant dust impact criteria;

·             to recommend further mitigation measures if found to be necessary; and

·             to comply with Action and Limit (A/L) Levels for air quality as defined in this Manual.

2.2              Air Quality Parameters

 

2.2.1               The criteria against which ambient air quality monitoring shall be assessed are the Hong Kong Air Quality Objectives (AQOs) for Total Suspended Particulates (TSP):

 

·             24-hour TSP level of 260 μg m-3; and

·             1-hour TSP level of 500 μg m-3.

2.2.2               These levels are not to be exceeded at Air Sensitive Receivers (ASRs).

2.3              Monitoring Equipment

 

2.3.1               The TSP levels shall be measured by following the standard method as set out in High Volume Method for Total Suspended Particulates, Part 50 Chapter 1 Appendix B, Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations of the USEPA.

 

2.3.2               Air samples shall be drawn at a controlled rate through a high volume sampler (HVS) fitted with a conditioned, pre-weighed filter paper.  After sampling for 24-hours, the filter paper with retained particles is collected and returned to the laboratory for drying in a desiccator followed by accurate weighing.  24-hour average TSP levels are calculated from the ratio of the mass of particulates retained on the filter paper to the total volume of air sampled.

 

2.3.3               All relevant data including temperature, pressure, weather conditions, elapsed-time meter reading for the start and stop of sampler, identification and weight of the filter paper, and other special phenomena and work progress of the concerned site, etc., shall be recorded in detail. A sample data sheet is shown in Appendix B.

 

2.3.4               HVS in compliance with the following specifications shall be used for carrying out the 1-hour and 24-hour monitoring:

 

·         0.6 - 1.7 m3 per minute (20 - 60 standard cubic feet per minute) adjustable flow range;

·         equipped with a timing/control device with ± 5 minutes accuracy for 24 hours operation;

·         installed with elapsed-time meter with ± 2 minutes accuracy for 24 hours operation;

·         capable of providing a minimum exposed area of 406 cm2 (63 in2);

·         flow control accuracy:  ± 2.5% deviation over 24-hour sampling period;

·         incorporated with an electronic mass flow rate controller or other equivalent devices;

·         equipped with a flow recorder for continuous monitoring;

·         provided with a peaked roof inlet;

·         incorporated with a manometer;

·         able to hold and seal the filter paper to the sampler housing at horizontal position;

·         filter can be changed easily; and

·         capable of 24-hour continuous operation.

 

 

2.3.5               The ET shall be responsible for the provision of the monitoring equipment. ET shall ensure that sufficient number of HVS’s with appropriate calibration kit are available for carrying out the baseline, regular impacts monitoring and ad-hoc monitoring.  The HVS’s shall be equipped with an electronic mass flow controller and be calibrated against a traceable standard at regular intervals in accordance with requirements stated in the manufacturers operating manual and as described below.  All the equipment, calibration kit, filter papers, etc., shall be clearly labelled.

 

2.3.6               The flow rate of each HVS with mass flow controller shall be calibrated using an orifice calibrator.  Initial calibration of the dust monitoring equipment shall be conducted upon installation and prior to commissioning.  One point flow rate calibration shall be carried out every two months.  Five-point calibration shall be carried out every six months.

 

2.3.7               The flow-rate of the sampler before and after the sampling exercise with the filter in position shall be verified to be constant and be recorded on the data sheet.

2.4              Monitoring Locations

 

2.4.1               One representative air sensitive receiver is proposed for monitoring during the construction phase of the Project (Table 2.1, Figure 2.1). Prior to commencement of the EM&A programme, the ET shall discuss and agree with the Engineer, IC(E) and EPD on the proposed air quality monitoring location.

 

Table 2.1

Air Quality Monitoring Location

 

Identification Number

Location

GCA B1

Kau Sai Chau Public Golf Course Administration Building

 

 

2.4.2               When alternative monitoring locations are proposed, the monitoring locations shall be chosen based on the following criteria:

 

· at the site boundary or such locations close to the major dust emission source;

· close to the sensitive receivers; and

· prevailing meteorological conditions.

2.4.3               When positioning the HVS’s, the following shall be noted:

 

·             a horizontal platform with appropriate support to secure the samplers against gusty wind shall be provided;

·             samplers shall be placed at least 2 m apart;

·             the distance between the sampler and an obstacle, such as buildings, must be at least twice the height that the obstacle protrudes above the sampler;

·             a minimum 2m horizontal separation from walls, parapets and penthouses is required for rooftops samplers;

·             a minimum 2m horizontal separation from any supporting structure is required;

·             no furnace or incinerator flue should be nearby;

·             airflow around the sampler should be unrestricted;

·             the sampler should be more than 20m from the dripline;

·             any wire fence and gate to protect the sampler, shall not cause any obstruction during monitoring;

·             permission must be obtained to set up the samplers and to obtain access to the monitoring stations; and

·             a secured supply of electricity is needed to operate the samplers.

2.5              Baseline Monitoring

 

2.5.1               Baseline monitoring shall be carried out to determine the ambient 1-hour and 24‑hour TSP levels at the designated monitoring locations, as shown in Table 2.1, prior to the commencement of the Project works.  During baseline monitoring, there shall not be any construction or dust generating activities in the vicinity of the monitoring stations.

 

2.5.2               TSP baseline monitoring shall be carried out for a continuous period of at least two weeks under typical weather conditions, with the 24-hour and three 1-hour ambient measurements taken daily at each monitoring location.  General meteorological conditions (wind speed, direction and precipitation) and notes regarding any significant adjacent dust producing sources shall also be recorded throughout the baseline monitoring period.

 

2.5.3               In case baseline monitoring cannot be carried out at the designated monitoring locations during the baseline monitoring period, the ET Leader shall carry out the monitoring at alternative locations which can effectively represent the baseline conditions at the impact monitoring locations. The alternative monitoring locations shall be approved by the Engineer and agreed with the IC(E).

 

2.5.4               In exceptional cases, when insufficient baseline monitoring data or questionable results are obtained, the ET shall liaise with the IC(E) and EPD to agree on an appropriate set of data to be used as a baseline reference and submit such data to the Engineer for approval.

 

2.5.5               The baseline monitoring will provide data for the determination of the appropriate Action levels with the Limit levels set against statutory or otherwise agreed limits.

 

2.5.6               Baseline checking of ambient TSP levels shall be carried out every six months at each monitoring location, when no dusty works activities are in operation.  If the ET considers that significant changes in the ambient conditions have arisen, the baseline monitoring exercise may, upon consultation and agreement with the Engineer, the IC(E) and the EPD, be repeated to update the baseline levels and air quality criteria.

2.6              Impact Monitoring

 

2.6.1               The monthly schedule of the compliance and impact monitoring programme shall be drawn up by the ET one month prior to commencement of the scheduled construction period.  For regular impact monitoring, a sampling frequency of at least once in every six days shall be strictly observed at all of the monitoring stations for 24-hour TSP monitoring.  In case of complaints, 1-hour TSP monitoring shall be conducted at least three times in every six days when the highest dust impacts are likely to occur.  The impact monitoring programme is summarised in Table 2.2.

 

Table 2.2

Air Quality Impact Monitoring Programme (TSP)

Sampling duration

Frequency

1 hour

·       3 times every 6 days (as required in case of complaints)

24 hours

·       Once every 6 days

 

2.6.2               Before commencing the monitoring, the ET shall inform the IC(E) of the impact monitoring programme such that the IC(E) can conduct on-site audits to ensure the accuracy of the impact monitoring results.

2.7              Compliance Assessment

 

2.7.1               Action and Limit (A/L) levels that provide an appropriate framework for the interpretation of monitoring results have to be agreed between ET, IC(E), EPD and the Engineer before commencement of air monitoring.  The air quality monitoring data shall be checked against the agreed A/L levels.  Recommended A/L levels are listed in Table 2.3.

 

Table 2.3

Action and Limit Levels for Air Quality

 

Parameter

Action Level (1)

Limit Level

TSP (24 hour average)

§         BL £ 200 μg m-3, AL = (BL * 1.3 + LL)/2

§         BL > 200 μg m-3, AL = LL

260 μg m-3

TSP (1 hour average)

§         BL £ 384 μg m-3, AL = (BL * 1.3 + LL)/2

§         BL > 384 μg m-3, AL = LL

500 μg m-3

 

(1) BL = Baseline level, AL = Action level, LL = Limit level.

2.8              Event and Action Plan (EAP)

 

2.8.1               The EAP is based on the principle of prescriptive procedures and actions associated with the measurement of certain defined levels of air pollution, as recorded by the environmental monitoring process, and the agreed A/L levels.  In cases these A/L levels are exceeded, the ET, the IC(E), the Engineer and the Contractor shall carry out the relevant actions prescribed in the EAP in Table 2.4.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2.4

Event / Action Plan for Air Quality

 

 

EVENT

ACTION

ET

IC(E)

Engineer

CONTRACTOR

ACTION LEVEL

1. Exceedance for one sample

1.      Identify source, investigate the causes of complaint and propose remedial measures;

2.      Inform IC(E) and Engineer;

3.      Repeat measurement to confirm finding;

4.      Increase to daily monitoring.

1.        Check monitoring data submitted by ET;

2.        Check Contractor’s working method.

1.        Notify Contractor.

1.   Rectify any unacceptable practice;

2.   Amend working methods if appropriate.

 

2. Exceedance for two or more consecutive samples

 

1.      Identify source;

2.      Inform IC(E) and Engineer;

3.      Advise Engineer on effectiveness of proposed remedial measures;

4.      Repeat measurements to confirm findings;

5.      Increase to daily monitoring;

6.      Discuss with IC(E) and Contractor remedial actions required;

7.      If exceedance continues, arrange meeting with IC(E) and Engineer;

8.      If exceedance stops, cease additional monitoring.

 

1.     Check monitoring data submitted by ET;

2.     Check Contractor’s working method;

3.     Discuss with ET and Contractor possible remedial measures;

4.     Advise ET on the effectiveness of proposed remedial measures;

5.     Supervise implementation of remedial measures.

 

1.    Confirm in writing receipt of notification of exceedance;

2.      Notify Contractor;

3.      Supervise proper implementation of remedial measures.

 

 

1.   Submit proposals for remedial measures to Engineer within three working days of notification;

2.   Implement agreed proposals;

3.   Amend proposal if appropriate.

LIMIT LEVEL

1. Exceedance for one sample

1.   Identify source, investigate causes of exceedance and propose remedial measures;

2.   Inform IC(E), Engineer, Contractor and EPD;

3.   Repeat measurement to confirm finding;

4.   Increase to daily monitoring;

5.   Assess effectiveness of Contractor’s remedial actions and keep IC(E), EPD and Engineer informed of results.

1.     Check monitoring data submitted by ET;

2.     Check Contractor’s working method;

3.     Discuss with ET and Contractor possible remedial measures;

4.     Advise Engineer on effectiveness of proposed remedial measures;

5.     Supervise implementation of remedial measures.

1.     Confirm in writing receipt of notification of exceedance;

2.     Notify Contractor;

3.     Supervise proper implementation of remedial measures.

1.        Take immediate action to avoid further exceedance;

2.        Submit proposals for remedial actions to IC(E) within three working days of notification;

3.        Implement the agreed proposals;

4.     Amend proposals if appropriate.

 

2 Exceedance for two or more consecutive samples

 

1.    Notify IC(E), Engineer, Contractor and EPD;

2.    Identify source;

3.    Repeat measurement to confirm findings;

4.    Increase to daily monitoring;

5.    Carry out analysis of Contractor’s working procedures to determine possible mitigation measures to be implemented;

6.    Arrange meeting with IC(E) and Engineer to discuss remedial actions to be taken;

7.    Assess effectiveness of Contractor’s remedial actions and keep IC(E), EPD and Engineer informed of results;

8.    If exceedance stops, cease additional monitoring.

 

Discuss amongst Engineer, ET, and Contractor the potential remedial actions;

Review Contractor’s remedial actions whenever necessary to assure their effectiveness, and advise Engineer accordingly;

Supervise implementation of remedial measures.

 

Confirm receipt of notification of exceedance in writing;

Notify Contractor;

In consultation with the IC(E), agree with the Contractor the remedial measures to be implemented;

Supervise proper implementation of remedial measures;

If exceedance continues, consider what portion of the works is responsible and instruct the Contractor to stop that portion of work until exceedance has abated.

 

1.   Take immediate action to avoid further exceedance;

2.   Submit proposals for remedial actions to IC(E) within three working days of notification;

3.   Implement the agreed proposals;

4.   Resubmit proposals if problem still not under control;

5.   Stop the relevant portion of works as instructed by Engineer until the exceedance is abated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


3.                        WATER QUALITY

3.1   Introduction

 

3.1.1               The water quality assessment in the EIA Report concludes that impacts to the marine and freshwater quality are not expected provided the Contractor implement the recommended mitigation measures. This section presents the requirements, methodology, equipment, monitoring locations, criteria and protocols for the monitoring and audit of marine and fresh water quality impacts during the construction phase of the Project.  Operation phase monitoring of water quality is recommended.

 

3.1.2               The objectives of the water quality monitoring programme are as follows:

 

§         to determine the effectiveness of the construction and operation phase controls and mitigation measures employed, and the need for supplementary mitigation measures; and

§         to check compliance with relevant WQO.

3.2   Water Quality Parameters

 

3.2.1               The ET shall be responsible for monitoring the parameters as shown below during the construction phase of the Project to ensure that any deterioration of water quality would be readily detected and timely rectifying action can be undertaken.

 

Construction Phase Monitoring

 

3.2.2               The water quality parameters which need to be monitored are as follows:

 

§             Marine water quality - dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature, turbidity, suspended solids (SS), pH and salinity

§             Stream water quality - dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature, turbidity, suspended solids (SS) and pH

 

3.2.3               Additional water quality parameters are required to monitor marine and stream water quality when the permanent low flow drainage system is not yet completed but turf establishment has to be in place during construction phase.  The ET Leader shall be responsible for liaison with the Contractor on the turf establishment programme.

 

3.2.4               Additional marine and stream water quality monitoring parameters include nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N), nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), total phosphate (TP) and selected pesticides parameters.  The ET Leader shall be responsible for confirming with the Project Proponent and the Contractor the actual pesticides used during the turf establishment before the required pesticides testing are carried out.

 

3.2.5               The ET Leader shall propose the additional monitoring parameters for approval by IC(E), Engineer, EPD and AFCD, and shall submit such information for approval at least 2 weeks before the turf establishment period.

 

3.2.6               In association with the water quality parameters, relevant data including monitoring location/position, time, weather conditions, and any special phenomena and work underway at the construction site shall also be measured.

 

3.2.7               A sample monitoring record sheet and data format are shown in Appendix B.

3.3   Monitoring Equipment

 

3.3.1               The equipment listed below shall be supplied by the ET and approved by the IC(E) and the Engineer for water quality monitoring.

 

Dissolved Oxygen and Temperature Measuring Equipment

 

3.3.2               The instrument shall be a portable and weatherproof DO measuring instrument complete with cable and sensor, and use a DC power source.  The equipment shall be capable of measuring:

 

·        dissolved oxygen levels in the range of 0 - 20 mg L-1 and 0 - 200% saturation; and

·        a temperature of 0 - 45 degrees Celsius.

 

3.3.3               It shall have a membrane electrode with automatic temperature compensation complete with a cable. Sufficient stocks of spare electrodes and cables shall be available for replacement where necessary. (For example, YSI model 59 meter, YSI 5739 probe, YSI 5795A submersible stirrer with reel and cable or an approved similar instrument).

 

3.3.4               Should salinity compensation not be built-in in the DO equipment, in-situ salinity shall be measured to calibrate the DO equipment prior to each DO measurement.

 

Turbidity Measurement Instrument

3.3.5               Turbidity shall be measured in situ by the nephelometric method. The instrument shall be portable and weatherproof turbidity measuring instrument using a DC power source complete with cable, sensor and comprehensive operation manuals.  It shall have a photoelectric sensor capable of measuring turbidity between 0 - 1000 NTU (for example, Hach model 2100P or an approved similar instrument). The cable shall not be less than 25m in length. The meter shall be calibrated in order to establish the relationship between NTU units and the levels of suspended solids.

 

Suspended solids

3.3.6               A water sample at least 2.5L in capacity with messenger and using a 10m line should be collected.  Samples should be submitted to HOKLAS accredited laboratory as soon as possible for gravimetric analysis for suspended.

 

Sampler

3.3.7               A water sampler is required.  It shall comprise a transparent PVC cylinder, with a capacity of not less than 2 litres, which can be effectively sealed with latex cups at both ends.  The sampler shall have a positive latching system to keep it open and prevent premature closure until released by a messenger when the sampler is at the selected water depth (for example, Kahlsico Water Sampler or an approved similar instrument).

 

Water Depth Detector

 

3.3.8               A portable, battery-operated echo sounder shall be used for the determination of water depth at each designated monitoring station.  This unit can either be hand held or affixed to the bottom of the work boat, if the same vessel is to be used throughout the monitoring programme.

 

 

 

Salinity

 

3.3.9               A portable salinometer capable of measuring salinity in the range of 0 - 40 parts per thousand (ppt) shall be provided for measuring salinity of the water at each monitoring location.

 

pH

3.3.10           The instrument shall consist of a potentiometer, a glass electrode, a reference electrode and a temperature-compensating device. It shall be readable to 0.1pH in a range of 0 to 14. Standard buffer solutions of at least pH 7 and pH 10 shall be used for calibration of the instrument before and after use. Details of the method shall comply with APHA, 19th ed. 4500-HTB.

 

Flow Rate Meter

3.3.11           A portable, battery-operated flow meter should be used for the determination of water depth at each designated monitoring location and record in m³/s. A hand held or meter fixed to the underside of the survey boat may be used.

 

Sample Containers and Storage

 

3.3.12           Water samples for laboratory analysis shall be stored in high density polythene bottles with no preservative added, packed in ice (cooled to 4°C without being frozen) and delivered to the laboratory and analysed as soon as possible after collection.  Sufficient volume of samples shall be collected to achieve the required detection limit.

 

Monitoring Position Equipment

3.3.13           A hand-held or boat-fixed type digital Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) with way point bearing indication or other equipment instrument of similar accuracy, shall be provided and used during marine water monitoring to ensure the monitoring vessel is at the correct location before taking measurements.

 

Calibration of In-Situ Instruments

3.3.14           All in situ monitoring instruments shall be checked, calibrated and certified by a laboratory accredited under HOKLAS or any other international accreditation scheme before use and subsequently re-calibrated at three monthly intervals throughout all stages of the water quality monitoring programme.  Responses of sensors and electrodes shall be checked with certified standard solutions before each use.  Wet bulb calibration for a DO meter shall be carried out before measurement at each monitoring location.

 

3.3.15           Sufficient stocks of spare parts shall be maintained for replacements when necessary.  Backup monitoring equipment shall also be made available so that monitoring can proceed uninterrupted even when some equipment is under maintenance, calibration, etc.

 

Laboratory Analysis

3.3.16           All laboratory work shall be carried out in a HOKLAS accredited laboratory. Water samples of about 1,000 ml shall be collected at the monitoring and control stations for carrying out the laboratory determinations. The determination work shall start within 24 hours after collection of the water samples. The analyses shall follow the standard methods according to APHA Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 19th Edition, or an equivalent method approved by EPD.

 

Table 3.1 

Methods and Detection Limits for Laboratory Analysis

 

Parameter

Recommended Method

Detection Limit

Suspended Solids      

APHA 2540 D

0.1 mg/L

Nitrate Nitrogen

APHA 4500-NO3-

0.01 mg/L

Nitrite Nitrogen

APHA 4500-NO2-

0.01 mg/L

Ammonia Nitrogen

APHA 4500-NH3(D)

0.01 mg/L

Total Inorganic Nitrogen

APHA 4500-Norg

0.01 mg/L

Total phosphorus

ASTM D515-88B

0.1 mg/L

Chlorpyrifos*

APHA Standard Methods or equivalent

0.5 µg/L

Imazaquin*

APHA Standard Methods or equivalent

0.5 µg/L

Glyphosate*

APHA Standard Methods or equivalent

0.5 µg/L

Oxadiazon*

APHA Standard Methods or equivalent

0.5 µg/L

2,4-D/Mecoprop*

APHA Standard Methods or equivalent

0.5 µg/L

Chlorothalonil*

APHA Standard Methods or equivalent

0.5 µg/L

Mancozeb*

USEPA 8206A

0.5 µg/L

Iprodione*

USEPA 8206A

0.5 µg/L

Fosetyl Aluminum*

APHA Standard Methods or equivalent

0.5 µg/L

Chlorpyrifos*

USEPA 8080 & 8082 SW-846

0.5 µg/L

Fipronil*

APHA Standard Methods or equivalent

0.5 µg/L

Imidachloprid*

APHA Standard Methods or equivalent

0.5 µg/L

 

Notes:

APHA: American Public Health Association. Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater Ed 19

ASTM: Annual Book of American Society for Testing and Materials Standards, Vol 11.01 & 11.02.

* : subject to changes

 

3.3.17           ET leader shall liase with Project Proponent and confirm the type of the pesticide to be applied at the golf course.   ET leader shall update the monitoring parameter, detection limit and analytical method accordingly.  The ET Leader should report and seek agreement from IC(E), ER and EPD before changing the monitoring parameter.

 

3.3.18           For each of the testing methods, details shall be submitted to the Director of Environmental Protection (DEP) or his representatives for approval prior to the commencement of the monitoring programme. The submitted information should include pre-treatment procedures, instrument use, Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) details (such as blank, spike recovery, number of duplicate samples per-batch etc), detection limits and accuracy. The QA/QC details shall be in accordance with requirements of HOKLAS or another internationally accredited scheme. The QA/QC results shall be reported. EPD may request the laboratory to carry out analysis of known standards provided by EPD for quality assurance. Additional duplicate samples may be required by EPD for inter-laboratory calibration. Remaining samples after analysis shall be kept by the laboratory for 3 months in case repeat analysis is required. If in-house or non-standard methods are proposed, details of method verification should, if required, be submitted to the EPD. In any case, sample testing shall have comprehensive quality assurance and quality control programmes. The laboratory shall be prepared to demonstrate the quality control programmes to the EPD or their representative if and when required.

 

 

 

 

3.4   Monitoring Locations

 

3.4.1               The water monitoring locations (Figure 3.1) are summarized in Table 3.2.  The status and locations of sensitive receivers may be subject to change, and if so, the ET Leader shall propose updated monitoring locations and seek agreement from the Engineer, IC(E), EPD and AFCD (if required).

 

3.4.2               The ET shall conduct the construction phase water quality monitoring while the Project Proponent shall conduct the operational phase EM&A.  Prior to the commencement of the construction EM&A programme, the ET Leader shall discuss and agree with the Engineer, the ET, IC(E), EPD and if required AFCD on the proposed water quality monitoring locations.  The Project Proponent or operator of the golf course shall liaise with EPD and if required AFCD on the monitoring requirements during the operational phase.

 

Table 3.2

Construction Phase Water Quality Monitoring Locations

 

Identification Number

Location

Co-ordinates

Monitoring parameters

Marine Water (9 stations)

Y

X

 

TTC

Tai Tau Chau Fish Culture Zone

851482

825428

DO, Temp., Turbidity, SS, pH and Salinity (both mid-flood and mid-ebb tides and at three water depths).

 

Additional parameters are required when the low flow drainage system is not completed include NO3-N, NO2-N, NH3-N, TP and selected pesticides.

KLW

Kai Lung Wan Fish Culture Zone

848994

825499

KS

Kau Sai Fish Culture Zone

850892

822544

M_BP

Temporary barging point

851269

825098

M_RO1

Desalination plant south of the existing pier

849395

828057

M _ Marsh

Discharge point at the existing marsh

850639

825810

M _ Coral

Marine water of Port Shelter

851735

824279

M _ A

Water Control Station of Port Shelter

849821

826997

M _ B

Water Control Station of Port Shelter

852643

822470

Fresh Water (7 stations)

 

 

 

F_UA, F_DA

Upstream and downstream of stream A

856762 (UA)

850898 (DA)

824317 (UA)

824510 (DA)

DO, Temp.,Turbidity, SS and pH (at mid-water depth).

 

Additional parameters are required when the low flow drainage system is not completed include NO3-N, NO2-N, NH3-N, TP and selected pesticides.

F_UB, F_DB

Upstream and downstream of stream B

851142 (UB)

851132 (DB)

824021 (UB)

824196 (DB)

F_UC, F_DC

Upstream and downstream of stream C

851339 (UC)

851515 (DC)

823962 (UC)

823688 (DC)

F _ Inland M

Downstream of the existing marsh (Inland)

850434

825818

 

Note: Monitoring location A (M_A) can make cross reference to PM4 and Monitoring location B (M_B) can make cross reference to PM9.

 

 

 

 

3.4.3               When proposed, alternative monitoring locations shall be chosen based on the following criteria:

 

§             at locations close to and preferably at the boundary of the mixing zone of major site activities which are likely to have water quality impacts as indicated in the EIA;

§             close to sensitive receivers which are directly or likely to be affected; and

§             care shall be taken to cause minimal disturbance to the sensitive receivers during monitoring.

 

3.4.4               Control stations are necessary to compare the water quality from potentially impacted sites with the ambient water quality. Control stations shall be located within the same body of water as the impact monitoring stations but shall be outside the area of influence of the works and, as far as practicable, not affected by any other works.

 

Site Record

 

3.4.5               In addition to the water quality parameters for both marine and stream water quality, other relevant data including monitoring location/position, time, weather conditions, sea conditions (where appropriate), tidal stage (where appropriate), special phenomena and work activities at the construction site shall also be measured and recorded. A sample data sheet is shown in Appendix B.

 

3.5   Baseline Monitoring

 

3.5.1               Baseline conditions for water quality shall be established and agreed upon with EPD prior to commencement of site works.  Baseline conditions shall normally be established by measuring the water quality parameters specified in Section 4.2. Measurements shall be taken at all designated monitoring locations including control stations, 3 days per week, for a period of 4 consecutive weeks prior to commencement of works.  The interval between of monitoring shall not be less than 36 hours.  Baseline monitoring schedule shall be submitted to EPD at least one week prior to commencement of baseline monitoring.  The purpose of the baseline monitoring is to establish ambient conditions without any discharge from the Project.

 

3.5.2               There shall be no construction works in the vicinity of the stations during baseline monitoring.

 

3.5.3               In exceptional cases when insufficient baseline monitoring data or questionable results are obtained, the ET Leader shall seek approval from IC(E) and EPD on an appropriate set of data to be used as baseline reference.

 

3.5.4               For marine water quality, where appropriate, measurements shall be taken at both mid-flood and mid-ebb tides and at three water depths (1 m below water surface, mid-depth and 1 m above sea bed, except where the water depth is less than 6 m, in which case the mid-depth station may be omitted).  Should the water depth be less than 3 m, only the mid-depth station will be monitored.  The status and locations of water sensitive receivers and the marine activities are subject to change, and any necessary changes in the monitoring locations shall be reviewed and approved by IC(E), EPD and if required AFCD before commencement of monitoring.

 

3.5.5               For the stream course, measurements shall be taken at mid-water depth.  The status and locations of water sensitive receivers and the works activities may be subject to change, and if so, the ET Leader shall propose with justification for changes to monitoring locations or other requirements of the EM&A water quality monitoring programme, and seek approval from the IC(E), EPD and, if required, AFCD.

 

 

3.6   Impact Monitoring

 

3.6.1               For construction phase marine monitoring, dredging works for submarine intake and outfall of desalination plant and temporary pier construction would need to be monitored.  For land-based constructions monitoring of sensitive streams, it should be carried out.  Additional water quality parameters are required to monitor marine and stream water qualities when the permanent low flow drainage system is not yet completed but turf establishment has to be in place during construction phase, monitoring should be also be carried.  The proposed permanent low drainage system will be completed in one year.  Construction sequence are starting at southern zone (Holes 11-16 between Mar 06 to Jul 06), then northern zone (Holes 3-9 between Jul 06 to Oct 06) and finally (Holes 1, 2, 10, 17, 18 between Oct 06 to Mar 07).

 

3.6.2               During the construction phase of marine and stream works, monitoring shall be undertaken three days per week, at mid-flood and mid-ebb tides, with sampling/measurement at the designated monitoring stations.  The interval between 2 monitoring events should not be less than 36 hours.  Proposed water quality monitoring schedule shall be submitted to EPD on or before the first day of the monitoring month.  EPD shall also be notified immediately for any changes in schedule by fax.

 

3.6.3               During the construction phase, impact monitoring shall be carried our three days per week during the first three months.  If exceedances are not record during the three-month period, the monitoring frequency can then be reduced to once per week, with sampling/measurement at the designated monitoring stations.  However, the ET Leader should report and seek agreement from IC(E), ER and EPD before changing the monitoring frequency.

 

3.6.4               Upon a completion of all construction activities, a post construction monitoring exercise on marine and stream water qualities shall be carried out.  Measurements shall be taken at all designated monitoring locations including control stations, 3 days per week, for a period of 4 consecutive weeks prior to commencement of works.  Monitoring location at RO (Fig 3.2) shall be carried out on bi-monthly basis after the post construction monitoring (This is serve supplementary data for the coral monitoring).

3.7   Action and Limit Level

 

3.7.1               The water quality criteria, namely Action and Limit levels, are shown in Table 3.3.  These criteria should be applied to ensure that any deterioration of water quality is readily detected and timely rectifying action is taken.  Should the water quality parameters monitoring results at any designated impact monitoring station exceed the water quality criteria, actions in accordance with the Event and Action Plan in Table 3.4 shall be carried out.

 

Table 3.3

Action and Limit Levels for Water Quality Monitoring

 

 Parameters

Action

Limit

DO in mg L-1

(Surface, Middle & Bottom)

Marine Water

Surface and Middle

5 percentile of baseline data for surface and middle layer

Bottom

5 percentile of baseline data for bottom layer

Marine Water

Surface and Middle

1 percentile of baseline data for surface and middle layer or 5 mg/L for FCZs

Bottom

1 percentile of baseline data for bottom layer or 2 mg/L for FCZs

DO in mg L-1 (mid-depth)

Inland Water

5 percentile of baseline data

Inland Water

4 mg/L

SS in mg L-1 (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Turbidity in NTU (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Salinity in ppt (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Ammonia Nitrogen (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Nitrate Nitrogen (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Nitrite Nitrogen (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

TIN in mg L-1 (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Total Phosphate in mgL-1 (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Pesticides in µg/L-1 (depth-averaged)

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Chlorpyrifos*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Imazaquin*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Glyphosate*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Oxadiazon*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

2,4-D/Mecoprop*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Chlorothalonil*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Mancozeb*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Iprodione*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Fosetyl Aluminum*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

 

Notes: 

1.    For DO, non-compliance of the water quality limits occurs when monitoring result is lower than the limits.

2.        For SS and turbidity, non-compliance of the water quality limits occurs when monitoring result is higher than the limits. 

3.        All figures given in the table are used for reference only and the EPD may amend the figures whenever it is considered as necessary.

4.        "Depth-averaged" is calculated by taking the arithmetic means of reading of all three depths.

* Monitored pesticides are subjected to change.  For any pesticides being monitored, the AL and LL should be less than the level of detection limit

 

Table 3.4

Event and Action Plan for Water Quality

 

Event

ET Leader

IC(E)

Engineer

Contractor

ACTION LEVEL

Action level being exceeded by one sampling day

Repeat in situ measurement to confirm findings;

Identify reasons for non-compliance and source(s) of impact;

Inform IC(E) and Contractor;

Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor's working methods;

Discuss mitigation measures with IC(E) and Contractor;

Repeat measurement on next day of exceedance.

Discuss mitigation measures with ET and Contractor ;

Review proposals on mitigation measures submitted by Contractor and advise the Engineer accordingly;

Assess effectiveness of implemented mitigation measures.

Discuss proposed mitigation measures with IC(E);

Make agreement on mitigation measures to be implemented.

Assess effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

Inform the Engineer and confirm in writing notification of the non-compliance;

Rectify unacceptable practice;

Check all plant and equipment;

Consider changes in working methods;

Discuss with ET and IC(E) and propose mitigation measures to IC(E) and Engineer;

Implement agreed mitigation measures.

Action level being exceeded by more than two consecutive sampling days

Repeat in situ measurement to confirm findings;

Identify reasons for non-compliance and source(s) of impact;

Inform IC(E) and Contractor;

Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor's working methods;

Discuss mitigation measures with IC(E) and Contractor;

Ensure mitigation measures are implemented;

Prepare to increase to daily monitoring;

Repeat measurement on next day of exceedance.

Discuss mitigation measures with ET and Contractor ;

Review proposals on mitigation measures submitted by Contractor and advise the Engineer accordingly;

Assess effectiveness of implemented mitigation measures.

Discuss the proposed mitigation measures with IC(E);

Make agreement on mitigation measures to be implemented;

Assess effectiveness of implemented mitigation measures.

Inform Engineer and confirm in writing notification of the non-compliance;

Rectify unacceptable practice;

Check all plant and equipment;

Consider changes in working methods;

Discuss with ET and IC(E) and propose mitigation measures to IC(E) and Engineer within three working days;

Implement agreed mitigation measures.

LIMIT LEVEL

Limit level being exceeded by one sampling day

Repeat in situ measurement to confirm findings;

Identify reasons for non-compliance and source(s) of impact;

Inform IC(E) Contractor and EPD;

Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor's working methods;

Discuss mitigation measures with IC(E), Engineer and Contractor;

Ensure mitigation measures are implemented;

Increase to daily monitoring until no exceedance of Limit level.

Discuss mitigation measures with ET and Contractor;

Review proposals on mitigation measures submitted by Contractor and advise the Engineer accordingly;

Assess effectiveness of implemented mitigation measures.

Discuss proposed mitigation measures with IC(E), ET and Contractor;

Request Contractor to critically review the working methods;

Make agreement on mitigation measures to be implemented;

Assess effectiveness of implemented mitigation measures.

Inform Engineer and confirm in writing notification of the non-compliance;

Rectify unacceptable practice;

Check all plant and equipment;

Consider changes in working methods;

Discuss with ET, IC(E) and Engineer and propose mitigation measures to IC(E) and Engineer within three working days;

Implement agreed mitigation measures.

Limit level being exceeded by more than two consecutive sampling days

Repeat in situ measurement to confirm findings;

Identify reasons for non-compliance and source(s) of impact;

Inform IC(E), Contractor and EPD;

Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor's working methods;

Discuss mitigation measures with IC(E), Engineer and Contractor;

Ensure mitigation measures are implemented;

Increase to daily monitoring until no exceedance of Limit level for two consecutive days.

Discuss mitigation measures with ET and Contractor;

Review proposals on mitigation measures submitted by Contractor and advise Engineer accordingly;

Assess effectiveness of implemented mitigation measures.

Discuss proposed mitigation measures with IC(E), ET and Contractor;

Request Contractor to critically review working methods;

Make agreement on mitigation measures to be implemented;

Assess effectiveness of implemented mitigation measures;

Consider and if necessary instruct Contractor to slow down or to stop all or part of the construction activities until no exceedance of Limit level.

Inform Engineer and confirm in writing notification of the non-compliance;

Rectify unacceptable practice;

Check all plant and equipment;

Consider changes of working methods;

Discuss with ET, IC(E) and Engineer and propose mitigation measures to IC(E) and Engineer within three working days;

Implement agreed mitigation measures;

As directed by the Engineer, slow down or stop all or part of the construction activities until no exceedance of Limit level.

 

3.8         Operation Phase Monitoring

3.8.1               Monitoring and auditing for marine and freshwater qualities are necessary during the operation phase of the proposed third golf course.  This is to ensure the compliance of water quality to relevant WQO standards at Port Shelter, EPD guideline values and discharge standards.  The monitoring programme would be required to ensure the implementation of recommended water quality mitigation measures proposed in the EIA report, to assess the effectiveness of these measures and to identify any further need for the additional mitigation measures or remedial action during operation phase of the third golf course.  This is the preliminary operation phase EM&A requirement.  A 2-year of monitoring period for the operation phase is proposed. A review shall be conducted 2 months before the completion of the 2-year monitoring programme by the Project Proponent to determine whether such monitoring shall be continued.  Monitoring should be carried out on bi-weekly basis for the first 12 months, after when the frequency will be reviewed.  The review results shall be submitted to EPD, AFCD (if required) and all the relevant parties. Any amendment on the monitoring programme shall be agreed by EPD and if required AFCD.

 

Marine Water Quality

 

3.8.2               The Project Proponent shall carry out the operation phase marine water quality monitoring.  The following is the general guidelines based on the existing golf course EM&A manual.  During the operation phase, water quality monitoring programme shall include the following three tasks:

 

·             Marine water quality monitoring;

·             Effluent monitoring from desalination plant; and

·             Water quality monitoring at marine sensitive receivers.

Effluent Quality for the Desalination Plant

3.8.3               It is proposed that effluent from the proposed desalination plant under normal operation be monitored. Samples shall be taken from 1m below the surface to ensure that the surface scum is not included in the sample.  Parameters to be monitored include pH, temperature, turbidity, suspended solids, DO and salinity discharged from the desalination plant.  A valid discharge licence shall be obtained from EPD prior to the discharge of effluent from the desalination plant, and the monitoring frequency, locations and parameters specified in the discharge licence shall be fully considered during the monitoring.

 

3.8.4               In addition, the outfall of desalination plant shall be monitored at the designated location (RO) as shown in Figure 3.2 at least once every 2 weeks during the first 3 months after commissioning of the desalination plant.  Monitoring frequency after then should be agreed with EPD.  During the operation phase of the desalination plant, the final effluent before discharge via the submarine outfall should be monitored against the effluent discharge standard as given in the discharge licence under the Water Pollution Control Ordinance (WPCO).  ECD of EPD should be consulted in advance for settling limits for future desalination plant.

 

3.8.5               The effluent results reflect whether the effluent quality is in compliance with the discharge licence requirements. In case of non-compliance, suitable actions shall be undertaken to notify the plant operator of the non-compliance and to identify the sources of exceedance. The operating conditions of the treatment systems shall be investigated. Corrective and remedial actions shall be implemented to improve the effluent quality. The monitoring team shall also increase monitoring frequency until the effluent quality is in compliance with the discharge licence requirements. All non-compliance and propose preventive measures shall be documented.

 

Marine and Stream Water Quality Monitoring (including lakes and existing reservoir)

 

3.8.6               The water monitoring locations (Figure 3.2) are summarized in Table 3.5.  The status and location of sensitive receiver may change after issuing this manual. If such cases exist, the Project Proponent shall propose updated monitoring locations and seek agreement from the EPD and AFCD (if required) two months before monitoring. 

 

Table 3.5

Operation Phase Water Quality Monitoring Locations

 

 

Identification Number

Location

Co-ordinates

Monitoring parameters

Marine Water (9 stations)

Y

X

 

TTC

Tai Tau Chau Fish Culture Zone

851482

825428

pH, temperature, DO, SS, turbidity, salinity, nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N), nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), total phosphate (TP), Chlorophyll-a and specific pesticides.

KLW

Kai Lung Wan Fish Culture Zone

848994

825499

KS

Kau Sai Fish Culture Zone

850892

822544

M_RO1

Desalination plant south of the existing pier

849395

828057

M _ RO2

Desalination plant north of the existing pier

849198

828290

M _ Marsh

Discharge point at the existing marsh

850639

825810

M _ Coral

Marine water of Port Shelter

851735

824279

M _ A

Water Control Station of Port Shelter

849821

826997

M _ B

Water Control Station of Port Shelter

852643

822470

Fresh Water (6 stations)

 

 

 

F_DA

Upstream and downstream of stream A

850898 (DA)

824510 (DA)

pH, temperature, DO, SS, turbidity, salinity, nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N), nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), total phosphate (TP), Chlorophyll-a and specific pesticides.  

F_DB

Upstream and downstream of stream B

851132 (DB)

824196 (DB)

F_DC

Upstream and downstream of stream C

851515 (DC)

823688 (DC)

F _ Inland M

Downstream of the existing marsh (Inland)

850434

825818

F _ lake 1D

Irrigation Lake 1D

851450

824498

F _ Filter

Filter effluent point at Hole 5

-

-

 

Note: Monitoring location A (M_A) can make cross reference to PM4 and Monitoring location B (M_B) can make cross reference to PM9.

 

3.8.7               The parameters to be monitored under the water quality monitoring programme shall include pH, temperature, DO, SS, turbidity, salinity, nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N), nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), total phosphate (TP), Chlorophyll-a and specific pesticides.   The typical types of pesticides to be applied at the golf course will be decided by the Project Proponent before commencement of the golf course operation.  Project Proponent shall update the monitoring parameters, detection limits and analytical methods accordingly.  The ET Leader should report and seek agreement from IC(E), ER and EPD before changing the monitoring parameter.

 

3.8.8                Frequency of the water monitoring programme should be on bi-weekly basis and should cover the effects of different tidal status (at least one for high tide and one for low tide) for marine quality monitoring.

 

3.8.9               Other relevant data including monitoring location/position, time, water depth, temperature, weather conditions and any special phenomena or work underway at the golf course shall also be recorded.

 

3.8.10           Additional duplicate samples may be required by EPD for inter-laboratory calibration.  Remaining samples after analysis shall be kept by the laboratory for 3 months in case repeat analysis is required.  If in-house or non-standard methods are proposed, details of method verification may also need to be submitted to EPD.  In any case, the sample testing shall have comprehensive quality assurance and quality control programmes.  The laboratory shall be prepared to demonstrate the programme to the DEP or his representatives when so requested.

 

3.8.11           The post construction monitoring data for marine and stream water qualities shall be used as the baseline values during the operation phase of the proposed third golf course.  Guideline value from the existing golf course shall be used for the irrigation lake 1D and existing reservoir during the first 6 months of operation phase as shown in the Table 3.6.

 

Table 3.6

Water Quality Monitoring Guideline for proposed third golf course

(applicable to irrigation lake 1D and existing reservoir)

 

Parameter (mg/L unless stated)

Guideline value

pH

6.0-9.0(1)

Turbidity (NTU)

-

Dissolved Oxygen

>4(1)

Chlorophyll a (mg/m³)

<5(1)

Nitrate N

0.20(1)

Nitrite N

0.20(1)

Ammoniacal N

0.50(1)

Total Kjeldahl N

1.2(2)

Total Phosphate

0.1(1)

Ortho Phosphate

0.05(1)

Conductivity (µS/cm)

<1000(1)

 

Note: (1) These values are based on professional judgement and knowledge

          (2) Based on 90th percentile of operational phase monitoring data (1996 to June 1998)

 

3.9   Action and Limit Level

 

3.9.1               The Action and Limit levels for (i) irrigation lake 1D and existing reservoir and (ii) marine and stream water qualities are shown in Table 3.7 and Table 3.8 respectively.  These criteria should be applied to ensure that any deterioration of water quality is readily detected and timely rectifying action is taken. 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 3.7

Action and Limit Levels for Water Quality Monitoring

(applicable to irrigation lake 1D and existing reservoir)

 

Parameter (mg/L unless stated)

Action and Limit Levels

pH

6.0-9.0(1)

Turbidity (NTU)

-

Dissolved Oxygen

>4(1)

Chlorophyll a (mg/m³)

<5(1)

Nitrate N

0.20(1)

Nitrite N

0.20(1)

Ammoniacal N

0.50(1)

Total Kjeldahl N

1.2(2)

Total Phosphate

0.1(1)

Ortho Phosphate

0.05(1)

Conductivity (µS/cm)

<1000(1)

 

Note: (1) These values are based on professional judgement and knowledge

          (2) Based on 90th percentile of operational phase monitoring data (1996 to June 1998)

 

 

Table 3.8

Action and Limit Levels for Water Quality Monitoring

(applicable to stream and marine water qualities)

 

 Parameters

Action

Limit

DO in mg L-1

(Surface, Middle & Bottom)

Marine Water

Surface and Middle

5 percentile of baseline data for surface and middle layer

Bottom

5 percentile of baseline data for bottom layer

Marine Water

Surface and Middle

1 percentile of baseline data for surface and middle layer or 5 mg/L for FCZs

Bottom

1 percentile of baseline data for bottom layer or 2 mg/L for FCZs

DO in mg L-1 (mid-depth)

Inland Water

5 percentile of baseline data

Inland Water

4 mg/L

SS in mg L-1 (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Turbidity in NTU (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Salinity in ppt (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Ammonia Nitrogen (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Nitrate Nitrogen (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Nitrite Nitrogen (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

TIN in mg L-1 (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Total Phosphate in mgL-1 (depth-averaged)

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

Pesticides in µg/L-1 (depth-averaged)

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Chlorpyrifos*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Imazaquin*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Glyphosate*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Oxadiazon*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

2,4-D/Mecoprop*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Chlorothalonil*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Mancozeb*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Iprodione*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Fosetyl Aluminum*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Chlorpyrifos*

Level of detection limit

Level of detection limit

Notes: 

1.    For DO, non-compliance of the water quality limits occurs when monitoring result is lower than the limits.

2.        For SS and turbidity, non-compliance of the water quality limits occurs when monitoring result is higher than the limits. 

3.        All figures given in the table are used for reference only and the EPD may amend the figures whenever it is considered as necessary.

4.        "Depth-averaged" is calculated by taking the arithmetic means of reading of all three depths.

* Monitored pesticides are subjected to change.  For any pesticides being monitored, the AL and LL should be less than the level of detection limit

 

3.9.2               Action and limit levels for parameters sampled in the proposed lake, existing reservoir, marine and stream water shall be reviewed after the first 6 months of monitoring.  Project proponent shall liaise with EPD (or AFCD if necessary) to confirm the action and limit level is still applicable.

 

 

3.10 Event and action plan

 

3.10.1           Should monitoring results of the water quality parameters at any designated monitoring station exceed the water quality criteria, action the proposed actions to be taken shall be as follows:

 

§             inform Golf Course Manager immediately and stop chemical application;

§             notify EPD/AFCD;

§             review the application and re-evaluate suitably and availability of alternatives to chemical controls, etc.;

§             agree remedial measures with Golf Course Manager and inform EPD/AFCD;

§             implement the agreed remedial measures immediately; and

§             increase monitoring frequency and/or locations to demonstrate effectiveness of the remedial measures.

 


4.                        4.      ECOLOGY

4.1   Introduction

 

4.1.1               The EIA stipulated that EM&A for ecology should be undertaken throughout the construction phase and during the early part of the operation phase of the project to ensure that all mitigation measures are fully complied with.  In particular, the objectives of the design audit shall be to ensure that the design process clearly implements the design for ecological mitigation specified in the EIA Report and to ensure that such designs are ecologically feasible and effective.  The construction and operational EM&A objectives shall be to ensure that the ecological contract works and construction mitigation procedures recommended are carried out as specified and are effective.  The construction and operational phases EM&A will be carried out as part of the site audit programme.

 

4.1.2               As stated in Annex 16 of the EIA-TM, the purpose of ecological monitoring of the audit are:

 

§         to monitor the effectiveness of the mitigation measures;

§         to detect unpredicted ecological impacts arising from the proposed development;

§         to verify the accuracy of the predictions of the ecological assessment study; and

§         to recommend action plans in response to unpredicted impacts, and/ or failed mitigation

 

4.1.3               In general, the performance of monitoring and audit from an ecological prospective will need to be integrated with the overall monitoring and audit plan for the project as a whole.  The commencement and program of the engineering works would enable the ecological monitoring program to be prepared based on seasonality factors.

4.2   Ecological Mitigation Measures and Implementations

 

4.2.1               Some of the proposed works are located on or near sensitive ecological habitats and/or rare or protected flora and fauna species which will need protection.

 

4.2.2               Design for ecological mitigation specified in the EIA will be incorporated into the final layout plan of the Project.  Ecological specifications including establishment of stream buffer zones will be detailed as part of the final layout plan.  The final ecological specifications and designs shall be provided to the contractors.

 

4.2.3               Mitigation measures required for the Project to minimise ecological impacts and to preserve ecological resources will be recommended by the EIA and specified in the Environmental Permit. 

 

4.2.4               Ecological mitigation measures to be implemented during the construction phase include the following:

·          Establishment of buffer zones for the natural stream courses during both construction and operational phase.

·          Provision of temporary bypass channels or pipes during construction phase for stream courses subject to pipe culverting.

·          Protection of water quality of the natural stream courses and temporary bypass channels or pipes.

 

·          Transplantation of coral colonies within the dredging area for the desalination plant.

·          Avoidance of corals when the anchoring points are deployed, and to shift the floating temporary barging point to the location with least corals within the mapping area.

·          Regular site audit of ecological mitigation measures and good site practice.

 

4.2.5               The boundaries of the buffer zones for the natural stream courses will be illustrated in the final layout plan.  The buffer zones will be demarcated prior to the commencement of any construction works using flagging and signage to direct the fence installers where to install the fence (Figure 4.1).  The buffer zones will be fenced using chain-link fence.  There will be no encroachment within the buffer zones.  Special caution will be paid at locations for crossings.  Buffer zone boundaries will be regularly checked to ensure works are not exceeded and that no damage occurs to the buffer zones.  Should buffer zones be encroached (even only once), the fencing at and within 30 m in either direction from the site of encroachment will be replaced with sheet-piling to serve as a physical barrier to personnel, equipment, and sediment.

 

4.2.6               Some sections of stream courses will be routed through culverts at locations of crossings, or into constructed underground channels beneath the fairways.  Prior to construction works, temporary bypass channels or pipes will be provided to divert the flow at the sections of natural stream courses to be culverted for crossings or underground channels.  The flow will be restored to the original paths and the bypass channels or pipes will be removed after the construction works are finished.

 

4.2.7               Water quality in the natural stream courses and temporary bypass channels or pipes must be protected from sedimentation and pollution by good site practices.  Earthworks near natural stream courses should be scheduled to avoid the wet season as far as possible, in particular the period from May to June, which is the key breeding period for aquatic fauna including shrimps. 

 

4.2.8               Site runoff should be directed towards regularly cleaned and maintained silt traps and oil/grease separators to minimise the risk of sedimentation and pollution of stream water.  The silt and oil/grease separators should be appropriately designed for the local drainage and ground conditions. Temporary drainage systems would be established on different parts of the construction areas in order to reduce the sedimentation of the stream courses.

 

4.2.9               Areas of exposed soil should be minimised to reduce the extent of soil erosion.  Spoil heaps should be covered at all times to minimise erosion.  Stockpiled materials shall be stored down-gradient from any stream course or up-gradient with a suitably constructed barrier to prevent loss of materials to the stream.

 

4.2.10           For all haulage roads, temporary bridges shall be used to cross all preserved streams and no contact shall be made with the preserved stream or its riparian vegetation.

 

4.2.11           The permanent bridges at Stream A and C would be supported by piers behind the stream banks and would not encroach the stream beds or the stream banks.

 

4.2.12           79 coral colonies were found within the mapping area which covered the dredging area for the desalination plant, all are common in Hong Kong, small in size, and of low ecological value.  Prior to the construction works for the desalination plant, the 79 coral colonies within the mapping area will be transplanted to a nearby transplantation site as specified in the EIA (see Figure 4.2). 

 

4.2.13           All anchoring points/structures of the floating pier would be located on the shore and/or at least 40m seaward to avoid the coral colonies. The location of the floating pier would be shifted from the original location for barging point at Zone 2 and Zone 3 of the mapping area in Site B2, to Zone 5 to further protect corals. Impacts to corals are not expected.

 

4.2.14           General good site practice will also serve to minimise ecological impacts and disturbance to wildlife.

 

·                  All contractors must be notified that introduction of dogs to the island is not allowed and the contractor will be held liable for capture and removal of any dogs or other domestic animals introduced to the island by any of the works personnel.

·                  Equipment or stockpiles should be placed in works areas only.

·                  Access routes should be selected on works areas only to minimise disturbance to natural habitats.

·                  Construction activities should be restricted to works areas that should be clearly demarcated.

·                  General drainage arrangements should include sediment and oil traps to collect and control construction site run-off.

·                  Waste skips should be provided to collect general refuse and construction wastes.  The wastes should be disposed of timely and properly off-site.

·                  Open burning on works sites is illegal, and should be strictly prohibited. Temporary fire fighting equipment should be provided in the work areas particularly near stream buffer zones.

4.2.15           The objective of compensatory planting is to mitigate for vegetation loss.  As far as possible landscape and compensatory planting should use native plants which bear flowers/fruits attractive to wildlife.  The ratio of compensation should follow the mitigation measures specified in the EIA.

4.3   Monitoring and Audit for Ecology

 

4.3.1               EM&A for ecology would be undertaken throughout the construction and operational phases of the project to ensure compliance with all mitigation measures.  The construction and operation EM&A objectives shall be to ensure that the ecological contract works and construction mitigation procedures recommended are carried out as specified and are effective.  The construction and operation phase EM&A will be carried out as part of the site audit programme.

 

4.3.2               As stated in Section 5.5 of Annex 16 of the EIA-TM, the purposes of ecological monitoring and audit programme are:

 

· to monitor the effectiveness of the mitigation measures;

· to detect unpredicted ecological impacts arising from the proposed development;

· to verify the accuracy of the predictions of the ecological assessment study; and

· to recommend action plans in response to unpredicted impacts, and/ or failed mitigation.

4.3.3               The proper implementation of mitigation measures recommended in the EIA report should be routinely audited during the construction and operational phases of the project.

 

4.3.4               Construction phase ecological EM&A will check the implementation of the ecological mitigation measures and the ecology contract works, together with auditing the effectiveness of mitigation.

 

4.3.5               Operation phase EM&A will continue to audit the effectiveness of mitigation measures.  The operation phase EM&A shall be undertaken during the Contractor’s one-year maintenance period.

 

4.3.6               Ecological monitoring and audit must be integrated with the overall EM&A plan for the project as a whole.  The program of the engineering works would enable the ecological monitoring program to be prepared with reference to seasonality, which might influence the frequency or intensity of monitoring sessions.  For example, should the programme for earthworks overlap part of a wet season, more frequent monitoring could be warranted during that overlap period to ensure the effectiveness of stream buffer zones.

 

4.3.7               The ecological EM&A programme during construction and operation will be implemented as set out in this manual.  Three major components shall be included and samples and measurements shall be taken as set out in the this manual.

 

(i)       Baseline survey;

(ii)      Construction phase monitoring; and

(iii)     Operational phase monitoring

 

Baseline Survey

4.3.8               Before commencement of any works on site, or any setting out of works or storage areas, the baseline surveys should be conducted.  Baseline survey will consist of a walk-over survey.  Special attention should be paid to ecologically sensitive streams to ensure minimum damage to existing vegetation and streams.  It may be necessary to rope off and protect specific habitats (e.g. natural stream courses) or species of special interest identified during the EIA study or during the walk-over surveys.  The purpose of the baseline survey will be to confirm the pre-works ecological conditions, with reference to the written descriptions and habitat maps included in the EIA Report. 

 

4.3.9               Prior to the commencement of all construction works, a baseline survey of natural corals would be conducted.  At each of the Site C, B2, Site D2 (on the bedrock 80m to the south of the existing ferry pier)(Figure 4.3) and a Control Site near the AFCD’s Coral Buoy at Sharp Island (Figure 4.4), 20 selected natural coral colonies would be tagged by the marine ecologist(s) to be approved by AFCD.  Each of the tagged coral colonies will be identified to species level and photographed.  Information on location, size and general condition of the surrounding environment will be recorded.  Other information shall also be recorded such as the survey date, time, climate, sea and tidal conditions.  Photos of the tagged corals would be used for AFCD approval on coral selection.  No less than 15 colonies would be selected for monitoring.  Priority shall be given to the largest and undamaged colonies as those colonies are likely to be more prone to sedimentation.  Tags on the excluded coral colonies will be removed at the first impact monitoring.  Seagrass beds were discovered at Site D3 during the EIA study (200 m south of the existing pier, at the estuary of Stream D). A baseline survey will also be conducted for seagrass at site D3 before the commencement of any construction works.  The extent of the seagrass beds, the coverage percentage and health conditions of seagrasses will be recorded. Site D2 will also be checked for the presence of seagrass individuals during the baseline monitoring. If seagrasses are also found in Site D2 in the baseline monitoring, the monitoring programme on seagrasses during construction and operation phases will expand to cover seagrasses at Site D2.

 

Construction and Operation Phase EM&A

4.3.10           The implementation of mitigation measures and ecology contract works, the Contractor’s compliance with the project’s environmental performance requirements, and the effectiveness of site mitigation measures during both construction and operation will be monitored and audited as detailed in the EP by the EM&A programme.  Detailed monitoring plans shall be developed and agreed prior to commencement of construction works. 

 

4.3.11           The ecological monitoring and auditing will be conducted by a qualified ecologist(s) who has a suitable background in natural history and a professional qualification in ecology or botany, and to be approved by AFCD.  The mitigation measures shall be audited as part of the site audit programme.

 

 

Table 4.1

Monitoring and Audit during the Construction Phase and the Mitigation Measures

 

Monitoring parameter

Frequency/Duration and/or responses

Checking the intactness of buffer zones for streams

 

Monitoring the compliance of operators in protecting demarcated areas.

 

Checking for other unauthorised clearing, trampling etc.

 

 

 

 

Checking the site for introduced dogs or other domestic animals

Once per week during construction phase. 

 

Any encroachment onto the stream buffer zones will be promptly reported to the ER/ET and corrective measures will be implemented immediately. 

Unauthorized encroachment onto natural vegetation will be promptly reported to the ET/ER.  Affected soils or other substrates will promptly be restored to pre-disturbance contours and hydroseeded.  If shrubs or trees are damaged, native shrubs and/or trees will be replanted to compensate for losses. 

 

Introduced dogs or other domestic animals will be immediately removed from the island or surrendered to the golf course superintendent for subsequent transfer to AFCD personnel. 

Checking the conditions of the water in the streams, temporary bypass channels or pipes, and construction sites for all stream crossings.

Contractor shall inspect all construction sites for potential erosion, sedimentation, and visible pollution (i.e. hydrocarbon sheen) in streams/channels once a week and after Amber, Red or Black Rain Storm event, Cyclone and Typhoon Warnings as announced by the Hong Kong Observatory.

 

Additional measures to prevent erosion and run off by contractor before the onset of rainfall include installation of additional sediment traps at appropriate locations by contractor as determined by the ET/ER.

When hydrocarbon pollution is detected, the source should be discovered and removed.  Visual inspection should be undertaken daily for 3 days or until the visible sheen is not present at the affected stream.

Besides the regular water quality monitoring for stream courses (at mid-water depth at both the upstream and downstream locations of Stream A, B & C, at least once a week upon the completion of all construction activities, see Water Quality section of this manual), stream crossings and related temporary bypass channels or pipes shall be inspected weekly to ensure stream banks are protected from disturbance and streams are protected from sedimentation.

Monitoring aquatic fauna

Streams B, C, and D will be monitored monthly during the construction phase to determine the status of Caridina trifasciata (shrimp) and Nanhaipotamon hongkongensis (freshwater crab).  Stream condition will be recorded with reference to the protective buffer zone.  Encroachment onto the buffer zone will be reported to the ER/ET.  Sheet piling will be installed at the buffer zone perimeter as needed to prevent further encroachment.  Stream sedimentation will be reported to the ER/ET, the agent causing sedimentation will be discovered, and sedimentation will be stopped. 

Fuel or chemical spill.

 

 

Immediate bunding of spill by Contractor.

Ensure remedial measures (including. cleanup of the spill, inspection of other chemical storage sites, and review of the handling procedures for chemicals) properly implemented.

 

Monitoring of spill and drainage channel/ waterway (if present) for contaminants.  Daily for five days after incidents.

 

Assessment of the spill and further action as determined by the ER/ET.

Stream buffer zones

Temporary bypass channels or pipes

New constructed underground channels

Audit compliance once at the end of the contract.

 

 

Transplanted corals

The transplanted coral colonies will be regularly checked by qualified marine ecologist(s) to be approved by AFCD quarterly for 1 year after transplantation.  The presence, survival, and health conditions of the transplanted coral colonies will be recorded by the number on the plastic tags.  The general conditions of the transplantation sites will also be reported.

Natural corals

All coral monitoring works should be conducted by experienced marine ecologist(s) to be approved by AFCD.  Natural corals would be monitored as a precautionary measure.  Prior to the commencement of all construction works, a baseline monitoring on natural corals would be conducted. At each of the Site C, B2, Site D2 (on the bedrock 80m south of the existing ferry pier) and a Control Site near AFCD’s Coral Buoy at Sharp Island, 20 selected natural coral colonies would be tagged by the marine ecologist(s) to be approved by AFCD.  Each of the tagged coral colonies shall be identified to species level and photographed.  Information on location, size and general condition of the surrounding environment will be recorded.  Other information shall also be recorded such as the survey date, time, climate, sea and tidal conditions.  Photos of the tagged corals would be used for AFCD approval on coral selection.  No less than 15 colonies would be selected for monitoring.  Priority will be given to the largest and undamaged colonies because those colonies are likely to be more susceptible to impacts of sedimentation.  Tags on the excluded coral colonies will be removed at the first impact monitoring.

Impact monitoring frequencies would be changed at different stages.  For the natural colonies at Site D2 (on the bedrock) and the Control Site, monitoring will be conducted weekly at the first two weeks of dredging works for the desalination plant pipelines. If no exceedance was recorded, the monitoring schedule would be changed to biweekly till the pipeline construction works are finished.  The presence, survival, and health conditions of the coral colonies will be recorded.  For the natural colonies at Site C, B2 and the Control Site, monitoring will be conducted monthly for the first three months of the construction phase. If no exceedance was recorded, the monitoring schedule would be changed to quarterly during the rest of the construction phase.  For each monitored coral colony, the percent of sediment coverage, the colour and the thickness of the sediment, the bleaching effect and live/dead ratio (the health status of coral colony) shall be recorded.  The action and limit level for the monitoring and the Event Action Plan are provided in Table 4.3 below.

 

Seagrass

Seagrasses at Site D3, and at Site D2 (if seagrasses was found at Site D2 during the baseline monitoring), would be monitored in conjunction with the coral monitoring at Site D2 (natural corals on bedrock).  The construction phase monitoring schedule would be the same as for coral monitoring at Site D2, weekly during the first two weeks of dredging works, and then biweekly till the pipeline construction works are finished.  The extent of the seagrass beds, the coverage percentage and health conditions of seagrasses will be recorded. As the natural coral colonies to be monitored at Site D2, which will have an Event Action Plan as present in the EM&A Manual, would be closer to the desalination than the seagrass beds, no action and limit level for seagrasses would be required.

 

 

Table 4.2

Monitoring and Audit during the Operation Phase and the Mitigation Measures

 

Monitoring parameter

Frequency/Duration and/or responses

Natural corals

Monitoring of the natural colonies at Site C, Site D2 (on the bedrock 80m south of the existing pier) and the Control Site, would be conducted during the first two years of the operation phase. The monitoring schedule during the first three months would be monthly.  If no exceedance was recorded, the monitoring schedule would be changed to semi-annually, i.e. once in dry season and once in wet season.  The survival, and health conditions of the coral colonies will be recorded. For each monitored coral colony, the percent of sediment coverage, the colour and the thickness of the sediment, the bleaching effect and live/dead ratio (the health status of coral colony) shall be recorded. The need of any further monitoring will be reviewed according to the monitoring results after the second year monitoring. All tags on the monitored corals must be removed after the monitoring. The action and limit level for the monitoring and the Event Action Plan are provided in Table 4.3 below.

 

Seagrass

During operation phase, the seagrass monitoring would be conducted in conjunction with the coral monitoring at Site D2 (natural corals on bedrock).  Seagrasses at Site D3, and at Site D2 (if seagrasses was found at Site D2 during the baseline monitoring), would be monitored during the first two years of the operation phase. The monitoring schedule during the first three months would be monthly.  After that, the monitoring schedule would be changed to semi-annually, i.e. once in dry season and once in wet season. The extent of the seagrass beds, the coverage percentage and health conditions of seagrasses will be recorded. As the natural coral colonies to be monitored at Site D2, which will have an Event Action Plan as present in the EM&A Manual, would be closer to the desalination than the seagrass beds, no action and limit level for seagrasses would be required. The need of any further monitoring will be reviewed according to the monitoring results after the second year monitoring. 

 

 

 

Table 4.3 Action and Limit level and Event Action Plan for natural corals monitoring

 

-                             Parameters

-                             Action Level

-                             Limit Level

-                             Sedimentation

-                             a 15% increase in the percentage of sedimentation on the hard corals occurs at more than 20% of the tagged coral colonies at one or more monitoring sites

-                             a 25% increase in the percentage of sedimentation on the hard corals occurs at more than 20% of the tagged coral colonies at one or more monitoring sites

-                             Bleaching

-                             a 15% increase in the percentage of bleaching of hard corals occurs at more than 20% of the tagged coral colonies at one or more monitoring sites

-                             a 25% increase in the percentage of bleaching of hard corals occurs at more than 20% of the tagged coral colonies at one or more monitoring sites

-                             Mortality

-                             a 15% increase in the percentage of partial mortality of corals occurs at more than 20% of the tagged coral colonies at one or more monitoring sites

-                             a 25% increase in the percentage of partial mortality of corals occurs at more than 20% of the tagged coral colonies at one or more monitoring sites

             

Action

Action Level

Limit Level

Construction phase

If the Action Level is exceeded the ET Leader should inform all parties (Contractor, Project Proponent, EPD, AFCD and IEC).  The data from the water quality monitoring should also be reviewed.  If the water quality monitoring shows no attributable effects of the installation works, then the Action Level is not triggered.  If the water quality data indicate exceedances (for SS and/or turbidity) the ET Leader should discuss with the Contractor the most appropriate method of reducing suspended solids during dredging (e.g. reduce the rate of dredging), and/or control sedimentation during earth works (e.g. check the intactness and effectiveness of the temporary drainage system and stream buffer zone). This mitigated method should then be enacted on the next working day.

If the Limit Level is exceeded the ET Leader should inform all parties (Contractor, Project Proponent, EPD, AFCD and IEC) immediately.  Should the Limit Level be exceeded, the contractor should stop dredging and/or earth works immediately and work out the solution according to the requirements of EPD and AFCD.  The ET Leader should inform the Contractor to suspend dredging and/or earth works until an effective solution is identified.  Once the solution has been identified and agreed with all parties dredging and/or earth works may commence

Operation phase

If the Action Level is exceeded the ET Leader should inform Golf Course Operator, EPD, and AFCD.  The data from the water quality monitoring should also be reviewed.  If the water quality monitoring shows no attributable effects of the installation works, then the Action Level is not triggered.  If the water quality data indicate exceedances (salinity and/or pesticides) the ET Leader should discuss with the Golf Course Operator the most appropriate method of reducing salinity (e.g. reduce the daily operation time of the desalination plant), and/or control chemicals from runoff (e.g. reduce the frequency and quantity of chemical applied, check the intactness and effectiveness of the closed drainage system and stream buffer zone). This mitigated method should then be enacted on the next working day.

If the Limit Level is exceeded the ET Leader should inform all parties Golf Course Operator, EPD, and AFCD immediately.  Should the Limit Level be exceeded, the Golf Course Operator should stop the operation of the desalination plant and/or the application of chemicals immediately and work out the solution according to the requirements of EPD and AFCD.  The operation of the desalination plant and/or the application of chemicals would be suspended until an effective solution is identified.

 

 

 

 

 

 


5.                        5.      Waste Management

5.1   Introduction

 

5.1.1               Waste management would be the Contractor’s responsibility to ensure that all wastes produced during the construction works for Project are handled, stored and disposed of in accordance with good waste management practices and EPD’s regulations and requirements.

 

5.1.2               Waste materials generated during construction activities, such as construction and demolition (C&D) materials and general refuse, are recommended to be audited at regular intervals (at least quarterly) to ensure that proper storage, transportation and disposal practices are being implemented.  This monitoring of waste management practices would ensure that these solid wastes generated during construction are not disposed of in nearby streams or other parts of the Project.  The audits shall also check that any chemical wastes generated during maintenance of construction equipment and vehicles are not stored within the sites of the Project.  The Contractor would be responsible for the implementation of any mitigation measures to minimise waste and redress problems arising from the waste materials.

5.2   Waste Control and Mitigation Measures

 

5.2.1               Mitigation measures for waste management for Project are summarised below.  With the appropriate handling, storage and removal of waste arisings during the construction works as defined below, the potential to cause adverse environmental impacts would be minimised.  During the site inspections, the ET shall pay special attention to the issues relating to waste management and check whether the Contractor has implemented the recommended good site practices and other mitigation measures.

Good Site Practices

 

5.2.2               Provided that good site practices are followed strictly, adverse impacts from waste management are not expected to arise.  Recommendations for good site practices during construction activities include:

 

u            nomination of approved personnel, such as a site manager, to be responsible for good site practices and making arrangements for collection of all wastes generated at the site and effective disposal to an appropriate facility;

u            training of site personnel in proper waste management and chemical waste handling procedures;

u            provision of sufficient waste disposal points and regular collection for disposal;

u            appropriate measures to minimise windblown litter and dust during transportation of waste by either covering trucks or by transporting wastes in enclosed containers;

u            regular cleaning and maintenance programme for drainage systems, sumps and oil interceptors;

u            a Waste Management Plan should be prepared and submitted to the Engineer for approval.  One may make reference to ETWB TCW No.15/2003 for details; and

u            a recording system for the amount of waste generated, recycled and disposed (including the disposal sites) should be proposed.

5.2.3               In order to monitor the disposal of C&D material at public filling areas and to control fly tipping, a trip-ticket system should be included as one of the contractual requirements to be implemented by the ET undertaking the EM&A work.  One may make reference to ETWB TCW No. 31/2004 for details.  The roles of the IC(E) are also detailed in this technical circular.

Waste Reduction Measures

5.2.4               Good management and control can prevent the generation of significant amounts of waste.  Waste reduction is best achieved at the planning and design stage, as well as by ensuring the implementation of good site practices.  Recommendations to achieve waste reduction include: 

 

u            segregation and storage of different types of waste in different containers, skips or stockpiles to enhance reuse or recycling of materials and their proper disposal;

u            separate labelled bins shall be provided to segregate aluminium cans from other general refuse generated by the work force, and to encourage collection of by individual collectors;

u            any unused chemicals or those with remaining functional capacity shall be recycled;

u            maximising the use of reusable steel formwork to reduce the amount of C&D material;

u            proper storage and site practices to minimise the potential for damage or contamination of construction materials; and

u            plan and stock construction materials carefully to minimise amount of waste generated and avoid unnecessary generation of waste.

 

5.2.5               In addition to the above good site practices and waste reduction measures, specific mitigation measures for identified waste which may arise are recommended below to minimise environmental impacts during handling, transportation and disposal of these wastes.

Construction and Demolition Material

5.2.6               To minimise impact from collection and transportation of C&D material for off-site disposal, the excavated soft spoil from the Project should be reused on-site as backfill material as far as practicable.  Suitable areas should be designated within the works site boundaries for temporary stockpiling of C&D material.  Within stockpile areas, the following measures should be taken to control potential environmental impacts or nuisance:

 

u            covering material during heavy rainfall;

u            locating stockpiles to minimise potential visual impacts; and

u            minimizing land take of stockpile areas as far as possible.

 

5.2.7               When disposing of C&D material at a public filling area, it shall be noted that the material shall only consist of soil, rock, concrete, brick, cement plaster/mortar, inert building debris, aggregates and asphalt.  The material shall be free from marine mud, household refuse, plastic, metals, industrial and chemical waste, animal and vegetable matter, and other material considered to be unsuitable by the Filling Supervisor at the public filling area.

Chemical Wastes

 

5.2.8               If chemical wastes are produced at the construction site, the Contractor would be required to register with the EPD as a Chemical Waste Producer and to follow the guidelines stated in the Code of Practice on the Packaging, Labelling and Storage of Chemical Wastes.   Good quality containers compatible with the chemical wastes should be used.  Appropriate labels should be securely attached on each chemical waste container indicating the corresponding chemical characteristics of the chemical waste, such as explosives, flammable, oxidizing, irritant, toxic, harmful, corrosive, etc.  The Contractor shall use a licensed collector to transport and dispose of the chemical wastes generated at the Chemical Waste Treatment Centre at Tsing Yi, or other licensed facility, in accordance with the Waste Disposal (Chemical Waste) (General) Regulation. No chemical waste should be allowed to be stored within the site of Project.  All chemical wastes should be removed from the site at the first instance.

General Refuse

5.2.9               General refuse should be stored in enclosed bins or compaction units separate from C&D material.  A reputable waste collector should be employed by the contractor to remove general refuse, separately from C&D material, from the site.

 


6.                        6.      CULTURAL HERITAGE

6.1         Introduction

 

6.1.1               The archeological impact assessment conducted in the EIA concluded that some potential for archaeological material remains at the Wan Chai Archaeological Site and a watching brief is recommended during the construction phase. A watching brief is a process whereby a qualified and licensed archaeologist monitors the excavation works during the construction phase in areas identified (and agreed with the Antiquities and Monuments Office (AMO)) to be of archaeological potential.  The watching brief methodology is set out below.  The archaeologist conducting the watching brief should obtain a licence prior to commencement of works as stipulated in Section 12 of the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance (Cap. 53).  The granting of the licence may take up to 8 weeks after the submission of the licence to the Antiquity Authority.

 

6.1.2               The built heritage impact conducted for the EIA has identified that the impacts to several graves can be mitigated with the implementation of buffer zone and preservation by record. The northern coastal section of the Kap Lo Kok Study Area of the proposed golf course extension is currently very heavily overgrown and parts of it were not accessible during the field survey. The area has the potential to contain as of yet unidentified historical graves and it is recommended that during the construction phase, that if during the course of works a grave is found that the AMO is contacted immediately and that works stop in the immediate vicinity of the grave until it can be inspected by AMO staff.

 

6.2   Cultural Heritage Requirements for EM&A

 

Wan Chai Archaeological Site

 

6.2.1               A watching brief should be undertaken by a qualified and licenced archaeologist during excavation works at the construction phase in the identified area marked on Figure 7.1.  A qualified archaeologist should inspect the site at an interval of not less than once a month when there is excavation work on site.  A construction programme should be provided to the archaeologist so that an inspection schedule can be arranged.  The archaeologist should be notified no less then 2 working days prior to any changes on the commencement of the excavation works so arrangements can be made to monitor the works.  The ET and IC(E) should facilitate arrangements and liaise between the archaeologist and construction contractor.

 

6.2.2               Monitoring is a form of mitigation which is required when engineering works impact on areas that have been assessed as having archaeological potential and where conventional testing methods are deemed insufficient.  The range of archaeological resources that require monitoring include both historical and prehistoric material and features.

 

6.2.3               The watching brief process entails the observation of the engineering works by qualified archaeologists in order to identify any archaeological material or features revealed during the excavation phase of the works schedule.  Upon identification of such material or features the archaeologists will require immediate access to the excavation area for recording of the material/features in situ, antiquities retrieval and sample collection.

 

6.2.4               These guidelines serve two basic purposes: firstly, that the archaeological resources are adequately recorded and recovered and secondly and, secondly, that appropriate measures are taken on site to minimize delays to the engineering works schedule.

 

 

 

Methodology of the Watching Brief

 

Monitoring personnel

 

6.2.5               Watching brief should be undertaken by a qualified archaeologist, who must apply for a licence under the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance (Cap. 53) from the Antiquity Authority before the monitoring works commence.

 

Areas to be monitored

 

6.2.6               The areas which require watching brief shall be defined to be submitted by the qualified archaeologist under the project and agreed with AMO prior to commencement of works.

 

Site access

 

6.2.7               Archaeologists should be allowed reasonable access to relevant areas of groundworks, so that deposits can be examined and recorded.  Trenches may require temporary shoring and groundworks might need to be temporarily rescheduled, to provide a safe environment for such works.  Provision should be made, at the earliest stage of construction programming, for unrestricted archaeological access to areas of groundworks in the identified area of archaeological potential (Figure 6.1).

 

Monitoring and retrieval methodology

 

6.2.8               Table 6.1, below, shows the various categories of archaeological material and features that are most likely to occur in local contexts.  Also listed are the recommended type and degree of recording and retrieval required for each category.  Upon discovery of any archaeological materials and features, the archaeologist shall report to the AMO immediately.

 

Recording forms for watching brief

 

6.2.9               A set of forms for the recording of any archaeological material identified during the watching brief process must be approved by the AMO.  They should include the following:

 

l      Registers to record the finds, special finds, contexts, photographs, drawings, levels and samples

l      Context description forms

l      A daily record form designed specifically for archaeological watching brief.  This form must locate clearly the area of works monitored, the nature and extent of the works, summaries of the days findings and cross reference to all register numbers used that day.

 

Safety requirements

 

6.2.10           Archaeologists and staff employed in monitoring must follow the safety procedures enforced by the contractors on site.

 

Mitigation measures

 

6.2.11           The project proponent should allow a flexibility to undertake the contingency arrangements.  Should significant archaeological materials be discovered, appropriate mitigation measures will be designed and implemented by the project proponent.

 

 

Progress Report

 

6.2.12           The archaeologist should keep the AMO informed of the progress of watching brief.  The archaeologist should submit progress reports every 3 months during the programme of the watching brief.

 

Watching brief report

 

6.2.13           The procedures and result of the Watching Brief should be presented in report form, following standards set by the AMO for reports on other types of archaeological field work.  This includes details of the overall programme, methodology, sampling strategy, implementation, findings and interpretation.  All data, material and records forming the site archive must be submitted to the AMO upon completion of the project.

 

6.2.14           The monitoring report should contain, as a minimum, the following elements:

 

l          Non-technical summary

l          Site location (including maps and relevant drawings) and descriptions

l          Context of the project

l          Geological and topographical background

l          Archaeological and historical background

l          General and specific aims of field works monitoring

l          Reference to relevant legislation

l          Field methodology

l          Collection and disposal strategy for artefacts and ecofacts

l          Arrangement for immediate conservation of artefacts

l          Publication and dissemination proposals

l          Archive deposition

l           Timetable

l           Contingency arrangement (if appropriate)

 

Table 6.1

Categories of Archaeological Finds and Recommended Action