Proposed Comprehensive Development

at Wo Shang Wai, Yuen Long

 

Environmental Monitoring & Audit

Manual

 

Document No. 221005

March 2008

 

 

 

Mott Connell Limited

7th Floor, West Wing Office Building

New World Centre

20 Salisbury Road

Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon

Hong Kong

 

Tel: 2828 5757

 

Fax: 2827 1823

 

Anne.Kerr@mottconnell.com.hk

in association with

 

Urbis Limited

Master Plan Limited

Asia Ecological Consultants Limited

Allied Environmental Consultant Limited

 

 

"This document has been prepared for the titled project or named part thereof and should not be relied upon or used for any other project without an independent check being carried out as to its suitability and prior written authority of Mott Connell being obtained. Mott Connell accepts no responsibility or liability for the consequences of this document being used for a purpose other than the purposes for which it was commissioned. Any person using or relying on the document for such other purpose agrees, and will by such use or reliance be taken to confirm his agreement, to indemnify Mott Connell for all loss or damage resulting therefrom. Mott Connell accepts no responsibility or liability for this document to any party other than the person by whom it was commissioned.

 

To the extent that this document is based on information supplied by other parties, Mott Connell accepts no liability for any loss or damage suffered by the client, whether contractual or tortious, stemming from any conclusions based on data supplied by parties other than Mott Connell and used by Mott Connell in preparing this document."

 

 

 


List of Contents                                                                                    Page No.

Chapters

1.         INTRODUCTION   1

1.1        Purpose of the Manual 1

1.2        Review of the EM&A Manual 1

1.3        Background  1

1.4        Location of Project Area  1

1.5        Sensitive Receivers  1

1.6        Environmental Monitoring and Audit Requirements  2

1.7        Project Organisation  4

1.8        Construction Programme  5

2.         AIR QUALITY   6

2.1        Introduction  6

2.2        Air Quality Parameters  6

2.3        Monitoring Equipment 6

2.4        Monitoring Locations  7

2.5        Baseline Monitoring  8

2.6        Impact Monitoring  9

2.7        Event and Action Plan for Air Quality  9

3.         NOISE   12

3.1        Introduction  12

3.2        Noise Parameters  12

3.3        Monitoring Equipment 12

3.4        Monitoring Locations  12

3.5        Baseline Monitoring  13

3.6        Impact Monitoring  13

3.7        Event and Action Plan for Noise  14

4.         WATER QUALITY   16

4.1        Introduction  16

4.2        Water Quality Parameters  16

4.3        Sampling Procedures and Monitoring Equipment 16

4.4        Monitoring Locations  17

4.5        Baseline Monitoring  18

4.6        Impact Monitoring  19

4.7        Operation Monitoring  19

4.8        Event and Action Plan for Water Quality  19

5.         SEWERAGE AND SEWAGE TREATMENT   23

5.1        Introduction  23

5.2        Mitigation Measures  23

6.         WASTE MANAGEMENT   24

6.1        Introduction  24

6.2        Audit Requirements  24

6.3        Good Site Practices  24

7.         ECOLOGY   28

7.1        Introduction  28

7.2        Mitigation Measures for Construction Phase  28

7.3        Monitoring Requirements  32

7.4        Wetland Quality Performance Limits and Action Plans  37

8.         FISHERIES   40

9.         CULTURAL HERITAGE   41

10.       LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL  42

10.1      Introduction  42

10.2      Mitigation Measures  42

10.3      Design Phase Audit 44

10.4      Baseline Monitoring  45

10.5      Construction and Operation Phase Audit 46

11.       SITE ENVIRONMENTAL AUDIT   49

11.1      Introduction  49

11.2      Compliance with Legal and Contractual Requirements  50

11.3      Environmental Complaints  50

12.       REPORTING   51

12.1      General 51

12.2      Electronic Reporting  51

12.3      Baseline Monitoring Report 52

12.4      EM&A Reports  53

12.5      Operation Phase Wetland Monitoring Reports  58

12.6      Data Keeping  58

12.7      Interim Notifications of Environmental Quality Limit Exceedances  59

 

 


List of Tables

Table 2‑1.... Air Quality Monitoring Stations. 7

Table 2‑2.... Action and Limit Levels for Air Quality. 9

Table 2‑3.... Event and Action Plan for Air Quality. 9

Table 3‑1.... Noise Monitoring Stations. 13

Table 3‑2.... Action and Limit Levels for Construction Noise. 14

Table 3‑3.... Event and Action Plan for Construction Noise. 14

Table 4‑1.... Water Quality Monitoring Stations. 18

Table 4‑2.... Action and Limit Levels for Construction Phase Water Quality. 19

Table 4‑3.... Action and Limit Levels for Operation Phase Water Quality. 20

Table 4‑4.... Event and Action Plan for Water Quality for Construction Phase. 20

Table 4‑5.... Event and Action Plan for Water Quality for Operation Phase. 22

Table 7‑1.... Summary of Construction and Operational Phase Ecological Monitoring for the Wo Shang Wai WRA. 33

Table 7‑2.... Wetland Quality Performance Limits and Contingency Plan. 37

Table 10‑1.. Proposed Construction Phase Mitigation Measures. 42

Table 10‑2.. Proposed Operation Phase Mitigation Measures. 43

Table 10‑3.. Event and Action Plan for Landscape for Design Phase. 45

Table 10‑4.. Construction and Operation Phase Audit Checklist 47

Table 10‑5.. Event  and Action Plan for Construction and Operational Phases. 48

 

List of Figures

Figure 1.1    Location Plan

Figure 1.2a   Location of Representative Air Quality Sensitive Receivers

Figure 1.2b   Location of Representative Noise Sensitive Receivers

Figure 1.2c   Location of Representative Water Quality Sensitive Receivers

Figure 1.3    Project Organisation and Lines of Communication

Figure 1.4    Implementation Programme

Figure 2.1    Proposed Location of Air Quality Monitoring Stations

Figure 3.1    Proposed Location of Noise Monitoring Stations

Figure 3.2    Proposed Location of Noise Barrier

Figure 4.1    Proposed Location of Water Quality Monitoring Stations (Construction Phase)

Figure 4.2    Proposed Location of Water Quality Monitoring Stations (Operation Phase)

Figure 7.1    Proposed Wetland Restoration Area

Figure 11.1   Complaint Response Procedures

Annexes

Annex A      Environmental Mitigation Implementation Schedule

Annex B      Sample Environmental Monitoring Data Recording Sheets

Annex C      Complaint Log

Annex D      Sample Interim Notification of Environmental Quality Limit Exceedances

 

 


1.                      INTRODUCTION

1.1                   Purpose of the Manual

1.1.1              The purpose of this Environmental Monitoring and Audit (EM&A) Manual (hereafter referred to as the Manual) is to guide the setup of an EM&A programme to ensure compliance with the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) study recommendations, to assess the effectiveness of the recommended mitigation measures and to identify any further need for additional mitigation measures or remedial action. This Manual outlines the monitoring and audit programme proposed for the Comprehensive Development at Wo Shang Wai, Yuen Long.

1.1.2              For the purpose of this Manual, the "Engineer" shall refer to the Engineer as defined in the Contract and the Engineer's Representative (ER), in cases where the Engineer's powers have been delegated to the ER, in accordance with the Contract. The Environmental Team (ET) Leader, who shall be responsible for and in charge of the Environmental Team, shall refer to the person delegated the role of executing the environmental monitoring and audit requirements.

1.2                   Review of the EM&A Manual

1.2.1              It shall be noted that this EM&A Manual is subject to changes. The Manual shall be reviewed and updated later, where necessary, prior to the commencement of construction of the Project.

1.3                   Background

1.3.1              In April 2005, Mott Connell Ltd was commissioned to undertake an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the Comprehensive Development of a currently vacant area at Wo Shang Wai as the Project was classified as Designated Project according to the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance (Cap. 499).  The Project comprises two major purposes:

·        residential development and associated infrastructure; and

·        wetland restoration.

1.3.2              From the EIA, the recommendations for monitoring contained herein, are made.

1.4                   Location of Project Area

1.4.1              The proposed development is encompassed by the residential uses (Palm Springs, Wo Shang Wai Village Houses, Royal Palms), fish ponds adjoining the south and north of the project area respectively. It is situated at the Deep Bay Wetland Buffer Area and close to the Conservation Area at the north. The location of the project is illustrated in Figure 1.1.

1.5                   Sensitive Receivers

1.5.1              Sensitive receivers have been identified in the EIA and are shown on Figures 1.2a, 1.2b and 1.2c.  Representative Sensitive Receivers (SRs) used for air quality, noise and water quality are selected according to the criteria set out in the Technical Memorandum on Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance (TMEIA) and listed as follows:

·         Royal Palms (ASR and NSR);

·         Palm Springs (ASR and NSR);

·         Wo Shang Wai Tsuen (ASR and NSR);

·         Village House of Mai Po San Tsuen (ASR and NSR);

·         Proposed Comprehensive Development at Wo Shang Wai (Subject Project Area) (ASR);

·         Fishponds in active use in the Conservation Area (CA) adjacent to the project area (WSR);

·         Drainage channel at the north of the project area (WSR);

·         The Deep Bay Water Control Zone (WSR);

·         Ramsar Site (WSR); and

·         Mai Po Nature Reserve (WSR)

1.6                   Environmental Monitoring and Audit Requirements

1.6.1              The EIA study identified the likely environmental impacts during construction and operational phases. These impacts can be minimised to acceptable levels with the implementation of environmental mitigation measures and environmental monitoring and audit requirements.  An Implementation Schedule of the environmental mitigation measures recommended in the EIA Report is described in Annex A. To ensure the environmental acceptability of the proposed development, monitoring and audit requirements have been identified and are described in details in the subsequent sections. Below is the summary of the EM&A requirements extracted from the EIA study:

Air Quality

1.6.2              Although the proposed Project is not expected to generate excessive dust levels, an environmental monitoring and audit programme is recommended to ensure the compliance of construction dust with the criteria and the proper implementation of mitigation measures.

Noise

1.6.3              Full compliance with the noise criteria will be achieved at all NSRs with the implementation of mitigation measures during construction phase. Environmental monitoring and audit is however recommended to ensure that the noise levels do not exceed the criteria during the construction phase. No operational noise monitoring is proposed as full compliance with the noise standards is predicted.

Water Quality

1.6.4              A water quality monitoring and site auditing programme is proposed, to ensure mitigation measures during construction phase will be implemented to protect the water bodies in the sensitive area from being further degraded. A water quality monitoring programme for the created wetland during operational phase is also recommended, to ensure the effectiveness of the water circulating system and the self sustainability of the wetland. The monitoring and audit details are given in a later section and in Appendix H of the Wetland Restoration Management Plan.


Sewerage and Sewage Treatment

1.6.5              There is no requirement for formal monitoring to be undertaken for this Project as all sewage generated at the proposed development will be discharged into the planned public sewer.  Confirmation has been received from both the Environmental Protection Department and Drainage Services Department in respect of discharging the domestic effluent into the planned trunk sewer along Castle Peak Road.  Therefore, the sewage generated from the development will be collected through the internal sewerage network and then discharged to this planned trunk sewer. There is therefore no (net) discharge from the project area. No sewage effluent will be discharged into the nearby water bodies even during the construction phase as the sewage generated from the on-site workers will be collected in chemical toilets and disposed off-site.

Waste Management

1.6.6              Auditing of each waste stream is recommended to be carried out periodically during the construction phase to determine if wastes are being managed in accordance with approved procedures.  A site waste management plan will need to be prepared by the Contractor to define the waste management procedures and protocols.  The audits will examine all aspects of waste management including waste generation, storage, recycling, treatment, transport and disposal and would be conducted on a monthly basis or more frequently if required.

Ecology

1.6.7              The implementation of the ecological mitigation measures stated in Section 8 of the final EIA report should be checked as part of the environmental monitoring and audit (EM&A) procedures during the construction period. Furthermore, the target species identified in the Ecological Impact Assessment (EcoIA) should be monitored according to the wetland mitigation performance targets stated in Appendix H of the final EIA report, to ensure effectiveness of the proposed mitigation measures. The details of the recommended monitoring and audit programmes are presented in the later section.

Fisheries

1.6.8              With the implementation of proper site practices to control site runoff and dust control during construction, no impact is expected. No fisheries-specific EM&A requirement will be required during the construction phase. No operational impact is anticipated after the completion of the proposed project and therefore no EM&A requirement will be required during the operation phase.

Cultural Heritage

1.6.9              Neither construction nor operational impact is anticipated and hence no EM&A will be required during the construction and operational phases.

Landscape and Visual

1.6.10           With the implementation of the recommended mitigation measures, no residual landscape and visual impacts are anticipated. Details of the recommended monitoring and audit programme are presented in a later section.


1.7                   Project Organisation

1.7.1              The proposed project organisation is shown in Figure 1.3.  The responsibilities of respective parties are:

The Contractor

·         provide assistance to the ET in carrying out monitoring;

·         submit proposals on mitigation measures in case of exceedances of Action and Limit levels in accordance with the Event and Action Plans;

·         implement measures to reduce impact where Action and Limit levels are exceeded, and

·         adhere to the procedures for carrying out complaint investigation in accordance with Section 11.3.

 

The Engineer or Engineers Representative

·         supervise the Contractors activities and ensure that the requirements in the Manual are fully complied with;

·         inform the Contractor when action is required to reduce impacts in accordance with the Event and Action Plans;

·         employ an IEC to audit the results of the EM&A works carried out by the ET; and

·         adhere to the procedures for carrying out complaint investigation in accordance with Section 11.3.

 

The Environmental Team

·         monitor the various environmental parameters as required in the Manual;

·         analyse the EM&A data and review the success of EM&A programme to cost effectively confirm the adequacy of mitigation measures implemented and the validity of the EIA predictions and to identify any adverse environmental impacts arising;

·         carry out site inspections to investigate and audit the Contractor’s site practice, equipment and work methodologies with respect to pollution control and environmental mitigation, and anticipate environmental issues for proactive action before problems arise;

·         audit and prepare audit reports on the environmental monitoring data and the site environmental conditions;

·         report on the EM&A results to the Independent Environmental Checker (IEC), Contractor, the ER, and the EPD;

·         recommend suitable mitigation measures to the Contractor in the case of exceedance of Action and Limit levels in accordance with the Event and Action Plans; and

·         adhere to the procedures for carrying out complaint investigation in accordance with Section 11.3.

1.7.2              The ET leader shall have relevant professional qualifications and at least 7 years of experience in environmental monitoring and audit (EM&A) or environmental management subject to approval of the ER and the Environmental Protection Department (EPD).

Independent Environmental Checker (IEC)

·         check, review, verify the EM&A works performed by the ET;

·         audit the monitoring activities and results;

·         evaluate the EM&A reports submitted by the ET;

·         review the proposals for mitigation measures submitted by the Contractor in accordance with the Event and Action Plans; and

·         adhere to the procedures for carrying out complaint investigation in accordance with Section 11.3.

1.7.3              The IEC shall have relevant professional qualifications and at least 7 years of experience in environmental monitoring and audit (EM&A) or environmental management subject to approval of the ER and the EPD.

1.7.4              Sufficient and suitably qualified professional and technical staff shall be employed by the respective parties to ensure full compliance with their duties and responsibility, as required under the EM&A programme for the duration of the project.  The ET shall not be in any way an associated body of the Contractor and the IEC. The IEC shall not be in any an associated body of the Contractor or the ET.

1.8                   Construction Programme

1.8.1              A preliminary project programme is shown in Figure 1.4.

1.8.2              The major construction activities are installation of vertical band drains, filling works, preloading, substructure works, pile cap/ footing works, superstructure works and excavation works for wetland construction.

Construction of the proposed residential development with wetland restoration are planned to commence in 2008 for completion by 2012.


2.                      AIR QUALITY

2.1                   Introduction

2.1.1              The Contractor shall follow the Air Pollution Control (Construction Dust) Regulation to implement dust mitigation measures during construction to minimise the dust impact to the nearby air sensitive receivers and to ensure the effectiveness of the implementation of dust mitigation measures recommended in the final EIA report.

2.2                   Air Quality Parameters

2.2.1              Monitoring and audit of the Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) levels shall be carried out by the ET to ensure that any deteriorating air quality could be readily detected and timely actions taken to rectify the situation.

2.2.2              1-hour and 24-hour TSP levels shall be measured to indicate the impacts of construction dust on air quality. The TSP levels shall be measured by following the standard high volume sampling method as set out in the Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1 (Part 50), Appendix B. Upon approval of the ER, 1-hour TSP levels can be measured by direct reading methods which are capable of producing comparable results as that by the high volume sampling method to indicate short event impacts.

2.2.3              All relevant data including temperature, pressure, weather conditions, elapsed-time meter reading for the start and stop of the sampler, identification and weight of the filter paper, other special phenomena and work progress of the concerned project area etc. shall be recorded in details.  A sample data sheet is shown in Annex B.

2.3                   Monitoring Equipment

2.3.1              The ET Leader is responsible for provision of the monitoring equipment.  He shall ensure that sufficient number of equipment with appropriate calibration kits are available for carrying out the baseline monitoring, regular impact monitoring and ad hoc monitoring.  All the equipment shall be clearly labelled.

2.3.2              HVS in compliance with the following specifications shall be used for carrying out the 1-hour and 24-hour TSP monitoring:

·         0.6 - 1.7 m3/min (20 - 60 standard cubic feet per minute) adjustable flow range;

·         equipped with a timing / control device with ± 5 minutes accuracy for 24 hours operation;

·         installed with elapsed-time meter with ± 2 minutes accuracy for 24 hours operation;

·         capable of providing a minimum exposed area of 406 cm2 (63 in2);

·         flow control accuracy:  ± 2.5% deviation over 24-hour sampling period;

·         equipped with a shelter to protect the filter and sampler;

·         incorporated with an electronic mass flow rate controller or other equivalent devices;

·         equipped with a flow recorder for continuous monitoring;

·         provided with a peaked roof inlet;

·         incorporated with a manometer;

·         able to hold and seal the filter paper to the sampler housing at horizontal position;

·         easy to change the filter, and

·         capable of operating continuously for 24-hour period.

2.3.3              Calibration of dust monitoring equipment shall be conducted as specified by the manufacturer.  Initial calibration of the dust monitoring equipment shall be conducted upon installation and thereafter at bi-monthly intervals (one-point calibration). Five-point calibration shall be carried out every six months. The calibration data shall be properly documented for future reference.  All the data shall be converted into standard temperature and pressure condition.

2.3.4              Wind data monitoring equipment shall also be provided and set up at conspicuous locations for logging wind speed and wind direction near to the dust monitoring locations. The equipment installation location shall be proposed by the ET and agreed with the ER in consultation with the IEC. In exceptional situations, the ET may propose alternative methods to obtain representative wind data upon approval from the ER and agreement from the IEC.

2.4                   Monitoring Locations

2.4.1              Four air quality monitoring locations are proposed and summarised in Table 2-1 as shown in Figure 2.1. As approval is needed from the premises landlord for dust monitoring equipment installation, it is not certain that a suitable location will be approved.  The status and locations of dust sensitive receivers may change after issuing this manual.  If such cases exist, the ET Leader shall propose updated monitoring locations and seek agreement from ER, IEC and EPD.

Table 21     Air Quality Monitoring Stations

ID

Description

Monitoring Location

ASR 1

Royal Palms

To the southeast of the project area

ASR 2A

Palm Springs

To the southwest of the project area

ASR 3

Wo Shang Wai Tsuen

To the south of the project area

ASR 4

Village House of Mai Po San Tsuen

To the east of the project area

 

2.4.2              When alternative monitoring locations are proposed, the following criteria, as far as practicable, shall be followed:

 

a)        at the project area boundary or such locations close to the major dust emission source;

 

b)        close to the sensitive receptors; and

 

c)        take into account the prevailing meteorological conditions.

 

2.4.3              When positioning the samplers, the following points shall be noted:

 

a)       only one at each location;

 

b)       the distance between the sampler and an obstacle, such as buildings, must be at least twice the height that the obstacle protrudes above the sampler;

 

c)       a minimum of 2 metres of separation from walls, parapets and penthouses is required;

 

d)       a minimum of 2 metres separation from any supporting structure, measured horizontally is required;

 

e)       no furnace or incinerator flue or building vent is nearby;

 

f)        airflow around the sampler is unrestricted;

 

g)       the sampler is more than 20 metres from the dripline;

 

h)       any wire fence and gate, to protect the sampler, shall not cause any obstruction during monitoring;

 

i)         permission must be obtained to gain access to the monitoring stations; and

 

j)         if needed, a secured supply of electricity shall be obtained to operate the samplers.

 

2.5                   Baseline Monitoring

2.5.1              The ET shall carry out baseline monitoring at all designated monitoring locations for at least 14 consecutive days prior to the commencement of the construction works to obtain daily 24-hr TSP samples.  1-hour sampling shall also be done at least 3 times per day while the highest dust impact is expected. 

2.5.2              During the baseline monitoring, there shall not be any construction or dust generation activities in the vicinity of the monitoring stations.  A schedule for the baseline monitoring shall be submitted to the ER and IEC for approval before the monitoring starts.

2.5.3              In case the baseline monitoring cannot be carried out at the designated monitoring locations during the baseline monitoring period, the ET shall carry out the monitoring at alternative locations which can effectively represent the baseline conditions at the impact monitoring locations.  The alternative baseline monitoring locations shall be approved by the ER and agreed with IEC prior to commencement of baseline monitoring.

2.5.4              In exceptional cases, when insufficient baseline monitoring data or questionable results are obtained, the ET shall liaise with the IEC and EPD to agree on an appropriate set of data to be used as a baseline reference and submit these to the ER for approval. 

2.5.5              Ambient conditions may vary seasonally and shall be reviewed as required.  If the ET considers that the ambient conditions have been changed and a repeat of the baseline monitoring is required to be carried out for obtaining the updated baseline levels, the monitoring shall be at times when the contractor's activities are not generating dust, at least in the proximity of the monitoring stations.  Should a change in ambient conditions be determined, the baseline levels and, in turn, the air quality criteria, shall be revised.  The revised baseline levels and air quality criteria shall be agreed with EPD and IEC.

2.6                   Impact Monitoring

2.6.1              The ET is responsible for impact monitoring during the course of the works.  For regular impact monitoring, 24-hr TSP monitoring shall be in the sampling frequency of at least once in every six-days. For 1-hr TSP monitoring, the sampling frequency of at least three times in every six-days shall be undertaken when the highest dust impact occurs.

2.6.2              In case of non-compliance with the air quality criteria, more frequent monitoring exercise, as specified in the Action Plan in Section 2.7, shall be conducted within 24 hours after the result is obtained.  This additional monitoring shall be continued until the excessive dust emission or the deterioration in air quality is rectified.

2.7                   Event and Action Plan for Air Quality

2.7.1              The baseline monitoring results form the basis for determining the air quality criteria for the impact monitoring.  The ET shall compare the impact monitoring results with air quality criteria set up for 24-hour TSP and 1-hour TSP level.  Table 2-2 shows the air quality criteria, namely Action and Limit (AL) Levels to be used.  Should non-compliance of the air quality criteria occurs, actions in accordance with the Event and Action Plan in Table 2-3 shall be carried out.

Table 22     Action and Limit Levels for Air Quality

Parameters

Action Level

Limit Level

24-hour TSP Level in µg/m³

For baseline level £ 200 µg/m³, Action level = (130% of baseline level + Limit level)/2

For baseline level > 200 µg/m³, Action level = Limit Level

260

1-hour TSP Level in µg/m³

For baseline level £ 384 µg/m³, Action level = (130% of baseline level + Limit level)/2

For baseline level > 384 µg/m³, Action level = Limit Level

500

Table 23     Event and Action Plan for Air Quality

Event

Action

ET Leader

IEC

ER

Contractor

Action Level

 

 

 

 

1.  Exceedance for one sample

1.   Identify source, investigate the causes of exceedance and propose remedial measures.

2.   Inform IEC and ER.

3.   Repeat measurement to confirm finding.

4.   Increase monitoring frequency to daily.

1.   Check monitoring data submitted by ET.

2.   Check Contractor’s working method.

1.   Notify Contractor.

1.   Rectify any unacceptable practice.

2.   Amend working methods if appropriate.

2.   Exceedance for two or more consecutive samples

 

1.    Identify the source.

2.    Inform IEC and ER.

3.    Advise ER on the effectiveness of the proposed remedial measures

4.   Repeat measurements to confirm findings.

5.   Increase monitoring frequency to daily.

6.   Discuss with IEC and the Contractor on remedial actions required.

7.   If exceedance continues, arrange meeting with IEC and ER.

8.   If exceedance stops, cease additional monitoring.

1.   Check monitoring data submitted by ET.

2.   Check the Contractor’s working method.

3.   Discuss with ET Leader and the Contractor on possible remedial measures.

4.   Advise ER on the effectiveness of the proposed remedial measures.

5.   Supervise implementation of remedial measures.

1.   Confirm receipt of notification of exceedance in writing.

2.   Notify the Contractor.

3.   Ensure remedial measures properly implemented.

1.   Submit proposals for remedial actions to IEC within 3 working days of notification.

2.   Implement the agreed proposals.

3.   Amend proposal if appropriate.

Limit Level

 

 

 

 

1.   Exceedance for one sample

1.   Identify source, investigate the causes of exceedance and propose remedial measures.

2.   Inform ER and EPD.

3.   Repeat measurement to confirm finding.

4.   Increase monitoring frequency to daily.

5.   Assess effectiveness of Contractor’s remedial actions and keep IEC, EPD and ER informed of the results.

1.   Check monitoring data submitted by ET.

2.   Check the Contractor’s working method.

3.   Discuss with ET Leader and the Contractor on possible remedial measures.

4.   Advise ER on the effectiveness of the proposed remedial measures.

5.   Supervise implementation of remedial measures.

1.   Confirm receipt of notification of exceedance in writing.

2.   Notify the Contractor.

3.   Ensure remedial measures properly implemented.

1.   Take immediate action to avoid further exceedance.

2.   Submit proposals for remedial actions to IEC within 3 working days of notification.

3.   Implement the agreed proposals.

4.   Amend proposal if appropriate.

2.   Exceedance for two or more consecutive samples

1.   Notify IEC, ER, EPD and the Contractor.

2.   Identify the source.

3.   Repeat measurements to confirm findings.

4.   Increase monitoring frequency to daily.

5.   Carry out analysis of the Contractor’s working procedures to determine possible mitigation to be implemented.

6.   Arrange meeting IEC and ER to discuss the remedial actions to be taken.

7.   Assess effectiveness of the Contractor’s remedial actions and keep IEC, EPD and ER informed of the results.

8.   If exceedance stops, cease additional monitoring.

1.   Discuss amongst ER, ET Leader and the Contractor on the potential remedial actions.

2.   Review the Contractor’s remedial actions whenever necessary and advise ER accordingly.

3.   Supervise the implementation of remedial measures.

1.   Confirm receipt of notification of exceedance in writing.

2.   Notify the Contractor.

3.   In consultation with IEC, agree with the remedial measures to be implemented.

4.   Ensure remedial measures are properly implemented.

5.   If exceedance continues, consider what activity of the work is responsible and instruct the Contractor to stop that activity of work until the exceedance is abated.

1.   Take immediate action to avoid further exceedance.

2.   Submit proposals for remedial actions to IEC within 3 working days of notification.

3.   Implement the agreed proposals.

4.   Resubmit proposals if problem still not under control.

5.   Stop the relevant activity of works as determined by ER until the exceedance is abated.

 

 


3.                      NOISE

3.1                   Introduction

3.1.1              The monitoring programme shall be carried out by the ET to ensure that the noise level of construction works complies with the 75dB(A) criterion for domestic premises, with 70 dB(A) for schools and with a further reduction to 65dB(A) during examination periods.

3.2                   Noise Parameters

3.2.1              The construction noise level shall be measured in terms of the A-weighted equivalent continuous sound pressure level (Leq).  Leq(30 min) shall be used as the monitoring parameter for the time period between 0700-1900 hours on normal weekdays.  

3.2.2              Supplementary information for data auditing, statistical results such as L10 and L90 shall also be obtained for reference.  A sample data record sheet is shown in Annex B for reference.

3.3                   Monitoring Equipment

3.3.1              As refer to the Technical Memorandum (TM) issued under the Noise Control Ordinance (NCO), sound level metres in compliance with the International Electrotechnical Commission Publications 651: 1979 (Type 1) and 804: 1985 (Type 1) specifications shall be used for carrying out the noise monitoring.  The calibration of the sound level meters and their respective calibrators shall be carried out in accordance with the manufacturer’s requirements.

3.3.2              Noise measurements shall not be made in the presence of fog, rain, wind with a steady speed exceeding 5 ms-1 or wind with gusts exceeding 10 ms-1.

3.3.3              The ET Leader is responsible for the provision and maintenance of the monitoring equipment.  He shall ensure that sufficient noise measuring equipment and associated instrumentation are available for carrying out the baseline monitoring, regular impact monitoring and ad hoc monitoring.  All the equipment and associated instrumentation shall be clearly labelled.  The location of equipment installation should be proposed by the ET Leader and agreed with the ER and EPD in consultation with the IEC.

3.4                   Monitoring Locations

3.4.1              The noise monitoring locations (Refer to Figure 3.1) are summarised in Table 3-1.  The status and locations of noise sensitive receivers may change after issuing this manual.  If such cases exist, the ET Leader shall propose updated monitoring locations and seek agreement from ER, IEC and EPD.


Table 31     Noise Monitoring Stations

Monitoring Station

Description

NSR 1

House No. 5, Cherry Path, Palm Springs

NSR 3

House No. 17, Wo Shang Wai Village

NSR 5

House No. 1, Ventura Avenue, Royal Palms

NSR 7

Mai Po San Tsuen

When alternative monitoring locations are proposed, the monitoring locations shall be chosen based on the following criteria:

a)        at locations close to the major project activities which are likely to have noise impacts;

 

b)        close to the noise sensitive receivers (any domestic premises, temporary housing accommodation, educational institution, place of public worship, shall be considered as a noise sensitive receiver); and

 

c)        for monitoring locations located in the vicinity of the sensitive receivers, care shall be taken to cause minimal disturbance to the occupants during monitoring.

3.4.2              The monitoring station shall normally be at a point 1m from the exterior of the sensitive receivers building facade and be at a position 1.2m above the ground.  If there is a problem with access to the normal monitoring position, an alternative position may be chosen, and a correction to the measurements shall be made.  For reference, a correction of +3dB(A) shall be made to the free field measurements.  The ET Leader shall agree with the IEC on the monitoring positions and the correction adopted.  Once the positions for the monitoring stations are chosen, the baseline monitoring and the impact monitoring shall be carried out at the same positions.

3.5                   Baseline Monitoring

3.5.1              The ET shall carry out baseline noise monitoring prior to the commencement of the construction works.  There shall not be any construction activities in the vicinity of the stations during the baseline monitoring.  Continuous baseline noise monitoring for the A-weighted levels LAeq, LA10 and LA90 shall be carried out daily for a period of at least two weeks in a sample period of 30 minutes between 0700 and 1900.  A schedule on the baseline monitoring shall be submitted to the ER and IEC for approval before the monitoring starts.

3.5.2              In exceptional case, when insufficient baseline monitoring data or questionable results are obtained, the ET Leader shall liaise with the IEC and EPD to agree on an appropriate set of data to be used as a baseline reference and submit to the ER for approval.

3.6                   Impact Monitoring

3.6.1              During normal construction working hour (0700-1900 Monday to Saturday), monitoring of LAeq, 30min noise levels (or as six consecutive LAeq, 5min readings) shall be carried out at the agreed monitoring locations once every week in accordance with the methodology in the TM. 

 

3.6.2              Other noise sources such as road traffic may make a significant contribution to the overall noise environment. Therefore, the results of noise monitoring activities will take into account such influencing factors, which may not be presented during the baseline monitoring period.

3.6.3              In case of non-compliance with the construction noise criteria, more frequent monitoring as specified in the Event and Action Plan in Section 3.7 shall be carried out.  This additional monitoring shall be continued until the recorded noise levels are rectified or proved to be irrelevant to the construction activities.

3.7                   Event and Action Plan for Noise

3.7.1              The AL Levels for construction noise are defined in Table 3-2.  Should non-compliance of the criteria occurs, action in accordance with the Event and Action Plan in Table 3-3 shall be carried out.

Table 32     Action and Limit Levels for Construction Noise

Time Period

Action

Limit

0700-1900 hrs on normal weekdays

When one documented complaint is received.

75* dB(A)

Note:

*           70 dB(A) for schools and 65 dB(A) during school examination periods.

 

Table 33     Event and Action Plan for Construction Noise

Event

Action

ET Leader

IEC

ER

Contractor

Action Level

1.    Notify IEC and the Contractor.

2.    Carry out investigation.

3.    Report the results of investigation to IEC and the Contractor.

4.    Discuss with the Contractor and formulate remedial measures.

5.    Increase monitoring frequency to check mitigation measures.

1.    Review with analyzed results submitted by ET.

2.    Review the proposed remedial measures by the Contractor and advise ER accordingly.

3.    Supervise the implement of remedial measures.

1.    Confirm receipt of notification of exceedance in writing.

2.    Notify the Contractor.

3.    Require the Contractor to propose remedial measures for the analyzed noise problem.

4.    Ensure remedial measures are properly implemented.

1.    Submit noise mitigation proposals to IEC.

2.    Implement noise mitigation proposals.

Limit Level

1.    Identify the source.

2.    Notify IEC, ER, EPD and the Contractor.

3.    Repeat measurement to confirm findings.

4.    Increase monitoring frequency.

5.    Carry out analysis of Contractor’s working procedures to determine possible mitigation to be implemented.

6.    Inform IEC, ER, and EPD the causes & actions taken for the exceedances.

7.    Assess effectiveness of the Contractor’s remedial actions and keep IEC, EPD and ER informed of the results.

8.    If exceedance stops, cease additional monitoring.

1.    Discuss amongst ER, ET Leader and the Contractor on the potential remedial actions.

2.    Review the Contractor’s remedial actions whenever necessary to assure their effectiveness and advise ER accordingly.

3.    Supervise the implementation of remedial measures.

1.    Confirm receipt of notification of exceedance in writing.

2.    Notify the Contractor.

3.    Require the Contractor to propose remedial measures for the analyzed noise problem.

4.    Ensure remedial measures are properly implemented.

5.    If exceedance continues, consider what activity of the work is responsible and instruct the Contractor to stop that activity of work until the exceedance is abated.

1.    Take immediate action to avoid further exceedance.

2.    Submit proposals for remedial actions to IEC within 3 working days of notification.

3.    Implement the agreed proposals.

4.    Resubmit proposals if problem still not under control.

5.    Stop the relevant activity of works as determined by the ER until the exceedance is abated.

 

 

 


4.                      WATER QUALITY

4.1                   Introduction

4.1.1              Under the Water Pollution Control Ordinance (WPCO) (Ch. 358), the proposed development locating in the Deep Bay Water Control Zone shall follow the relevant Water Quality Objectives (WQOs) in assessing compliance of any effects from the construction and operation of the Project.

4.1.2              A water quality monitoring and site auditing programme is proposed to set out the guideline of monitoring in construction phase to be taken in order to protect the water bodies in the sensitive area from being degraded. A water quality monitoring programme is also developed for the created wetland in operation phase.

4.2                   Water Quality Parameters

4.2.1              Monitoring for Dissolved Oxygen (DO), temperature, pH, suspended solids (SS) and Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) shall be undertaken at designated monitoring locations. The purpose of which is to ensure that any deterioration in water quality can be readily detected and timely action can be taken to resolve any problems. Changes in water quality which may affect the suitability of conditions for aquatic life can be detected by changes in parameters such as DO, SS and temperature. Change in pH value will indicate the possibility of acidification events and certain types of pollution while BOD could indicate the level of organic matter in the water bodies.

4.2.2              It should be noted that DO, temperature and pH should be measured in-situ whereas SS and BOD should be analysed in a laboratory. In association with the water quality parameters, other relevant data shall also be measured, such as monitoring location/position, time, weather conditions, and any special phenomena and description of work underway at the construction site etc.

4.3                   Sampling Procedures and Monitoring Equipment

4.3.1              (N.B. Water samples for all monitoring parameters shall be collected, stored, preserved and analysis according to Standard Methods, APHA 19 ed. and/or methods agreed by the Director of Environmental Protection. In-situ measurements at monitoring locations including DO, temperature and pH shall be collected by equipment with the characteristics and functions listed in the following sections).

4.3.2              The following equipment and facilities shall be provided by the ET and used for the monitoring of water quality impacts:

Dissolved Oxygen and Temperature Measuring Equipment

4.3.3              DO and water temperature shall be measured in-situ by a DO/ temperature meter. The instrument should be portable and weatherproof using a DC power source. It should have a membrane electrode with automatic temperature compensation complete with a cable. The equipment should be capable of measuring:

·            a DO level in the range of 0-20 mg/1 and 0-200% saturation; and

·            a temperature of between 0 and 45 degree Celsius.

pH value Measuring Equipment

4.3.4              Measurement of pH level will be recorded in-situ by a pH meter which shall consist of a potentiometer, a glass electrode, a reference electrode and a temperature-compensating device. The range of pH value shall be 0 to 14 with 0.1 as the base unit.

Suspended Solids and BOD Measurements (Sample Containers and Storage)

4.3.5              Water samples for SS analysis should be stored in high density polythene bottles with no preservative added, packed in ice (cooled to 4oC without being frozen), delivered to the laboratory, and analysed as soon as possible after collection. Analysis shall be carried out in a HOKLAS or other international accredited laboratory. 

Calibration of In-Situ Instruments

4.3.6              All pH meters, DO/ temperature meters shall be checked and calibrated prior to use. 

4.3.7              Standard buffer solution of at least 2 pH levels (either pH 4 and pH 7 or pH 7 and pH 10) shall be used for calibration of the instrument before and after use.

4.3.8              DO meters shall be calibrated by a laboratory accredited under HOKLAS or any other international accreditation scheme, and subsequently re-calibrated at 3 monthly intervals throughout all stages of the water quality monitoring. Responses of sensors and electrodes shall be checked with certified standard solutions before each use.  Wet bulb calibrations for all DO meters shall be carried out before measurement at each monitoring location.  For the on site calibration of field equipment, BS 127:1993, "Guide to field and on-site test methods for the analysis of waters" should be observed.

Laboratory Measurement/Analysis

4.3.9              Each sample shall be analysed in accordance with the APHA Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 19th edition, or an equivalent method approved by the EPD. If an in-house or non-standard method is proposed, details of the method verification may require to be submitted to the EPD.  In any circumstance, the sample testing shall comply with a comprehensive quality assurance and quality control programme.  The laboratory should be prepared to demonstrate the quality programmes to the EPD when requested.

4.4                   Monitoring Locations

4.4.1              The water quality monitoring points as presented in this EM&A Manual shall be reviewed and additional monitoring locations shall be considered with the exception of monitoring points located inside the project area boundary. Referring to Table 4-1, Figures 4.1 and 4.2, it is suggested that the monitoring points MP1 to 6 shall be adopted during construction phase while monitoring points WM1 to 4 located inside the wetland area and along the water ditch shall be adopted during operation phase. The final locations and number of the monitoring points shall be agreed with EPD at least 2 weeks before undertaking any works.  The status and locations of water quality sensitive receivers may change after issuing this manual.  If such cases exist, the ET leader shall propose updated monitoring locations and seek approval from the IEC and EPD.

Table 41     Water Quality Monitoring Stations

ID

Description

Easting

Northing

MP1

For Construction Phase

838 730.50

822 862.25

MP2

For Construction Phase

838 933.26

823 247.41

MP3

For Construction Phase

839 107.17

823 596.84

MP4

For Construction Phase

839 286.14

823 638.55

MP5

For Construction Phase

839 134.35

823 722.99

MP6

For Construction Phase

839 063.02

823 842.25

WM1

For Operation Phase

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

WM2

For Operation Phase

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

WM3

For Operation Phase

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

WM4

For Operation Phase

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

4.4.2              When alternative monitoring locations are proposed, they shall be chosen based on the following criteria:

(a)     at locations close to and preferably at the boundary of the mixing zone of the major project activities as indicated in the EIA report, which are likely to have water quality impacts;

(b)      close to the sensitive receptors which are directly or likely to be affected;

(c)     for monitoring locations located in the vicinity of the sensitive receptors, care shall be taken to cause minimal disturbance during monitoring;

4.4.3              Measurement shall be taken at 3 water depths, namely, 1m below water surface, mid-depth and 1m above stream bed/pond bed, except where the water depth less that 6m, the mid-depth station may be omitted. Should the water depth be less than 3m, only the mid-depth station will be monitored. The ET Leader shall seek approval from the IEC and EPD on all the monitoring stations.

4.4.4              Replicates in-situ measurements and samples collected from each independent monitoring event are required for all parameters to ensure a robust statistically interpretable dataset.

4.5                   Baseline Monitoring

4.5.1              Baseline conditions for the water quality of the sensitive ditches/drainage channels shall be established and agreed with the EPD and AFCD prior to the commencement of works. The purposes of the baseline monitoring are to establish ambient conditions prior to the commencement of the construction works and to demonstrate the suitability of the proposed impact and reference monitoring points.

4.5.2              The baseline conditions shall normally be established by measuring the water quality parameters specified in Section 4.2. The measurements shall be taken at all designated monitoring stations including control points, 3 days per week, for at least 4 weeks prior to the commencement of construction works.

 

 

4.5.3              There shall not be any construction activities over water in the vicinity of the points during the baseline monitoring.

4.5.4              In exceptional case when insufficient baseline monitoring data or questionable results are obtained, the ET Leader shall seek approval from the IEC and EPD on an appropriate set of data to be used as baseline reference.

4.5.5              Baseline monitoring schedule shall be faxed to EPD 1 week prior to the commencement of baseline monitoring. The interval between 2 sets of monitoring shall not be less than 36 hours.

4.6                   Impact Monitoring

4.6.1              During the course of the construction works, monitoring shall be undertaken 3 days per week, with sampling at the designated monitoring points. The interval between 2 sets of monitoring shall not be less than 36 hours except where the Action and/or Limit levels is/are exceeded, in which case the monitoring frequency will be increased. The frequency of monitoring shall be agreed with EPD at least 2 weeks before undertaking any works.

4.6.2              Proposed water quality monitoring schedule shall be faxed to EPD on or before the first day of the monitoring month, EPD shall be notified immediately of any change in the schedule by fax.

4.7                   Operation Monitoring

4.7.1              During the course of the operation of the restored wetland, monitoring shall be undertaken once per month, with sampling at the designated monitoring points. The frequency of monitoring shall be agreed with EPD at least 2 weeks before undertaking any works. Details of monitoring requirements and methodology are specified in Section 7.3.3.

4.8                   Event and Action Plan for Water Quality

4.8.1              The Action and Limit (AL) Levels for water quality for construction and operation phases are defined in Tables 4-2 and 4-3 respectively. The actions in accordance with the Action Plan in Tables 4-4 and 4-5 shall be carried out if the water quality assessment criteria are exceeded at any designated monitoring points.

Table 42     Action and Limit Levels for Construction Phase Water Quality

Parameters

Action Level

Limit Level

DO in mg/l

5 percentile of baseline data

≤ 2 or 1 percentile of baseline data

pH

< 5.5 or > 7.5

< 4.0 or > 8.0

Turbidity in NTU

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

SS in mg/l

95 percentile of baseline data

99 percentile of baseline data

BOD

For Surveillance only.

For Surveillance only.

 


Table 43     Action and Limit Levels for Operation Phase Water Quality

Parameters

Action Level

Limit Level

DO in mg/l

≤ 2

≤ 1

pH

< 6.5 or > 8.0

< 6.0 or > 8.5

Salinity in ppt

> 2

> 5

Ammoniacal nitrogen in mg/l

> 3

> 6

BOD

For surveillance

For surveillance

Total oxidized nitrogen (nitrite and nitrate) in mg/l

> 5

> 10

Total Phosphorus in mg/l

> 5

> 10

Orthophosphate

For surveillance

For surveillance

           

Notes: All the figures given in the table are used for reference only and the EPD may amend the figures whenever it is considered as necessary.

Table 44     Event and Action Plan for Water Quality for Construction Phase

Event

Action

ET Leader

IEC

ER

Contractor

Action Level

 

 

 

 

1. Exceedance for one sample

1.   Repeat in-situ measurement to confirm finding;

2.   Identify source(s) of impact;

3.   Inform IEC and Contractor;

4.   Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor’s working methods;

5.   Discuss mitigation measures with IEC and Contractor; and

6.   Repeat measurement on next day of exceedance.

1.   Discuss with ET and Contractor on the mitigation measures;

2.   Review proposals on mitigation measures submitted by Contractor and advise the ER accordingly; and

3.   Assess the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

 

1.   Inform EPD and AFCD and confirm notification of non-compliance in writing;

2.   Discuss with IEC on the proposed mitigation measures; and

3.   Make agreement on the mitigation measures to be implemented.

 

1.   Inform the ER and confirm notification of the non-compliance in writing;

2.   Rectify unacceptable practice;

3.   Check all plant and equipment;

4.   Consider changes of working methods;

5.   Discuss with ET and IEC and propose mitigation measures to IEC and ER; and

6.   Implement the agreed mitigation measures.

2. Exceedance for two or more consecutive samples

 

1.   Repeat in-situ measurement to confirm finding;

2.   Identify source(s) of impact;

3.   Inform IEC and Contractor;

4.   Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor’s working methods;

5.   Discuss mitigation measures with IEC and Contractor;

6.   Ensure mitigation measures are implemented;

7.   Prepare to increase the monitoring frequency to daily; and

8.   Repeat measurement on next day of exceedance.

1.   Discuss with ET and Contractor on the mitigation measures;

2.   Review proposals on mitigation measures submitted by Contractor and advise the ER accordingly; and

3.   Assess the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

 

1.   Inform EPD and AFCD and confirm notification of non-compliance in writing;

2.   Discuss with IEC on the proposed mitigation measures;

3.   Make agreement on the mitigation measures to be implemented; and

4.   Assess the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

1.   Inform the ER and confirm notification of the non-compliance in writing;

2.   Rectify unacceptable practice;

3.   Check all plant and equipment;

4.   Consider changes of working methods;

5.   Discuss with ET and IEC and propose mitigation measures to IEC and ER within 3 working days; and

6.   Implement the agreed mitigation measures.

Limit Level

 

 

 

 

1. Exceedance for one sample

1.   Repeat in-situ measurement to confirm finding;

2.   Identify source(s) of impact;

3.   Inform IEC, Contractor and EPD;

4.   Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor’s working methods;

5.   Discuss mitigation measures with IEC, ER and Contractor;

6.   Ensure mitigation measures are implemented; and

7.   Increase the monitoring frequency to daily until no exceedance of Limit level.

1.   Discuss with ET and Contractor on the mitigation measures;

2.   Review proposals on mitigation measures submitted by Contractor and advise the ER accordingly; and

3.   Assess the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

 

1.   Inform EPD and AFCD and confirm notification of non-compliance in writing;           

2.   Discuss with IEC, ET and Contractor on the proposed mitigation measures; and

3.   Request Contractor to critically review the working methods;

4.   Make agreement on the mitigation measures to be implemented; and

5.   Assess the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

1.   Inform the ER and confirm notification of the non-compliance in writing;

2.   Rectify unacceptable practice;

3.   Check all plant and equipment;

4.   Consider changes of working methods;

5.   Discuss with ET and IEC and ER and propose mitigation measures to IEC and ER within 3 working days; and

6.   Implement the agreed mitigation measures.

2. Exceedance for two or more consecutive samples

1.   Repeat in-situ measurement to confirm finding;

2.   Identify source(s) of impact;

3.   Inform IEC, Contractor and EPD;

4.   Check monitoring data, all plant, equipment and Contractor’s working methods;

5.   Discuss mitigation measures with IEC, ER and Contractor;

6.   Ensure mitigation measures are implemented; and

7.   Increase the monitoring frequency to daily until no exceedance of Limit level for two consecutive days.

1.   Discuss with ET and Contractor on the mitigation measures;

2.   Review proposals on mitigation measures submitted by Contractor and advise the ER accordingly; and

3.   Assess the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures.

 

1.   Inform EPD and AFCD and confirm noitification of non-compliance in writing;

2.   Discuss with IEC, ET and Contractor on the proposed mitigation measures; and

3.   Request Contractor to critically review the working methods;

4.   Make agreement on the mitigation measures to be implemented;

5.   Assess the effectiveness of the implemented mitigation measures; and

6.   Consider and instruct, if necessary, the Contractor to slow down or to stop all or part of the marine work until no exceedance of Limit Level.

1.   Inform the ER and confirm notification of the non-compliance in writing;

2.   Rectify unacceptable practice;

3.   Check all plant and equipment;

4.   Consider changes of working methods;

5.   Discuss with ET and IEC and ER and propose mitigation measures to IEC and ER within 3 working days;

6.   Implement the agreed mitigation measures; and

7.   As directed by the Engineer, to slow down or to stop all or part of the marine work or construction activities.

 

Table 45     Event and Action Plan for Water Quality for Operation Phase

Exceedance for pH, DO and SS sample

 Action Level

Limit Level 

Actions to be taken

1.   Double the monitoring frequency;

2.   Identify and review the problem; and

3.   Carryout the actions for limit level exceedance should the problem is likely to deteriorate.

1.   Water exchange / add water/ remove identified contamination source/ propose and implement other measures.

 


5.                      SEWERAGE AND SEWAGE TREATMENT

5.1                   Introduction

5.1.1              An assessment of potential impacts due to the sewage arising from the proposed residential development has been assessed in Section 6 of the final EIA report. The sewage generated from the development is proposed to be discharged to the future public trunk sewer along Castle Peak Road, no sewerage and sewage impacts are anticipated from the proposed development and monitoring and audit of the sewerage system is considered not required.

5.2                   Mitigation Measures

5.2.1              It is understood that a new trunk sewer will be constructed along Castle Peak Road and will be available for use in 2012. This trunk sewer will connect into the existing Yuen Long Sewage Treatment Works. The tentative sewage disposal scheme for the Development is to discharge the sewage to this planned trunk sewer via the sewer system. The proposed network comprises sewers to be laid under the future internal roadwork which will convey the sewage generated within the development to the future trunk sewer in Castle Peak Road. Gravity sewers will be used to collect the sewage as far as possible. However, should there be any discharge level constraints imposed by the future trunk sewer, a local pumping station will be provided within the development, at a location before the terminal manhole of the development, to lift up the sewage to a level that can be connected to the trunk sewer. The sewers will be protected by concrete surrounds to minimize the risk of sewer bursts.  All the sewers and sewerage facilities within the proposed development before the terminal manhole will be operated and maintained by the owner. The gravity sewer outside the development connecting the terminal manhole to the future public sewer will be maintained by DSD subject to their agreement in the detailed design stage.

5.2.2              As all the sewage generated will be discharged away from the proposed development and conveyed to public sewage treatment plant, there will be no net discharge from this project area.  This scheme has been discussed with EPD and DSD and they have expressed no objection in principle on the option, however, the arrangement will need to be further discussed with DSD and EPD during the detailed design stage. It has been estimated that a 300mm diameter sewer will have adequate flow capacity to handle the sewage arising from the proposed development. As EPD and DSD have both confirmed that their proposed upgrading/new sewers at Castle Peak Road in North West New Territories will be adequate to receive the sewage arising from the proposed development, the use of computerized analysis techniques to assess the impact on the public sewer is not considered to be required.  Close monitoring of the implementation programme will be undertaken to ensure the sewage generated from the proposed development can discharge to the planned trunk sewer at the planned design horizon. 

5.2.3              The construction of the sewers and manholes (general civil works), and the pumping station if required, will be carried out in line with the construction of the substructure and superstructure works for the proposed development. Installation of electrical and mechanical equipment will follow, with testing and commissioning being carried out after the successful installation of the required electrical and mechanical equipment.


6.                      WASTE MANAGEMENT

6.1                   Introduction

6.1.1              The Contractor shall prepare a plan to control the waste generated from the construction activities. Besides removal of waste material produced and implementation of recommended mitigation measures to minimise waste problems arising, a site waste inventory record should be maintained. The Contractor shall mention good site practice to ensure that the waste impacts are minimised and shall make sure that relevant disposal permits are obtained.

6.1.2              For the waste to be disposed appropriately, it is recommended that, if practical, the waste should be separated by category on-site by the Contractor. The following categories shall be adopted:

·         Site clearance waste

·         Excavated materials

·         Construction and Demolition (C&D) waste

·         Chemical waste

·         General refuse

6.2                   Audit Requirements

6.2.1              It is recommended that auditing of each waste stream should be carried out periodically by the contractor to determine if wastes are being managed in accordance with approved procedures and the site waste management plan.  The audits should look at all aspects of waste management including waste generation, storage, recycling, treatment, transport and disposal.  An appropriate audit programme would be to undertake the first audit at the commencement of the construction works, and then to audit weekly thereafter.

6.3                   Good Site Practices

6.3.1              Good site practice shall be maintained and specific procedures in dealing with different kind of wastes shall be followed during construction. The Contractor shall make a thorough reference from the relevant Legislations (such as the Waste Disposal Ordinance (Cap 354)) and guidelines (such as the Code of Practice on the Packaging, Labelling and Storage of Chemical Wastes (1992) by EPD).

Waste Management Hierarchy

6.3.2              Various waste management options are as follows:

·         avoidance and minimisation, i.e. not generating waste through changing or improving practices and design;

·         reuse of materials, thus avoiding disposal (generally with only limited reprocessing);

·         recovery and recycling, this avoiding disposal (although reprocessing may be required); and

·         treatment and disposal, according to relevant laws, guidelines and good practice.

6.3.3              This hierarchy should be used to evaluate waste management options, thus allowing waste reduction measures to be introduced at the detailed design stage and carried through to the construction phase.

6.3.4              Training and instruction of construction staff should be given at the project area to increase awareness and draw attention to waste management issues and the need to minimise waste generation. The training requirement should be included in the site waste management plan.

Storage, Collection and Transport of Waste

6.3.5              Permitted waste haulers should be used to collect and transport wastes to the appropriate disposal points.  Measures to minimise adverse impacts should be instigated as appropriate practical for example:

·         handle and store wastes in a manner which ensures that they are held securely without loss or leakage, thereby minimising the potential for pollution.

·         use waste haulers authorised or licensed to collect specific category of waste;

·         remove wastes on a daily basis;

·         maintain and clean waste storage areas daily;

·         minimise windblown litter and dust during transportation by either covering trucks or transporting wastes in enclosed containers;

·         obtain the necessary waste disposal permits from the appropriate authorities if they are required, in accordance with Waste Disposal Ordinance (Cap 354), Waste Disposal (Chemical Waste) (General) Regulation (Cap 354), the Land (Miscellaneous Provisions) Ordinance (Cap 28);

·         Dispose of the waste at licensed waste disposal facilities

·         Develop procedures such as ticketing system to facilities tracking of loads, particularly for chemical waste, and to ensure that illegal disposal of wastes does not occur, and

·         Maintain records of the quantities of wastes generated, recycled and disposal.

Excavated/Imported Filling Material

6.3.6              The excavated/imported filling material may have to be temporarily stockpiled on-site. Control measures should be taken at the stockpiling area to prevent the generation of dust and pollution of stormwater channels.  However, to eliminate the risk of blocking drains in the wet season, it is recommended that stockpiling of excavated materials during wet season should be avoided as far as practicable.

 

Dust:

·         wetting the surface of the stockpiled soil with water when necessary especially during the dry season;

·         covering the stockpiled soil with sheets;

·         minimising disturbance of the stockpiled soil; and

·         enclosure of stockpiling area.

 

Water Quality:

·         installation of silt traps for the surface water drainage system; and

·         covering stockpiled material with tarpaulin during heavy rainstorm.

 

 

6.3.7              In addition, potential dust impacts due to the haulage of excavated/imported filling materials should be minimised by undertaking the following control measures:

·         dropping heights for those materials should be controlled to a practical height to minimise the fugitive dust arising from unloading;

·         materials should not be loaded to a level higher than the side and tail boards, and should be dampened or covered before transport.

·         the travelling speed should be reduced to 10 km hr-1 to reduce dust dispersion and re-suspension from the operating haul trucks;

·         wheel washing facilities should also be installed and sued by all vehicles leaving the project area.

Construction & Demolition Materials

6.3.8              In order to minimise waste arisings and to keep environmental impacts within acceptable levels, environmental control measures are recommended.

·           Careful design, planning and good site management can minimize over-ordering and generation of waste materials such as concrete, mortars and cement grouts.  The design of formwork should maximize the use of standard wooden panels so that high reuse levels can be achieved.  Alternatives such as steel formwork of plastic facing should be considered to increase the potential for reuse.

·           The Contractor should recycle as much of the C&D material as possible on-site.  Proper segregation of wastes on site will increase the feasibility of certain components of the waste stream by the recycling contractors. 

·           Government has established a charging scheme for the disposal of waste to landfill.  This will provide additional incentives to reduce the volume of waste generated and to ensure proper segregation of wastes to allow free disposal of inert material to public filling areas.

Chemical Waste

6.3.9              For those processes which generate chemical waste, it may be possible to find alternatives which generate reduced quantities or even no chemical waste, or less dangerous types of chemical waste.

6.3.10           Chemical waste that is produced, as defined by Schedule 1 of the Waste Disposal (Chemical Waste) (General) Regulation, should be handed in accordance with the Code of Practice on the Packaging, Handling and Storage of Chemical Waste as follows:

6.3.11           Containers used for the storage of chemical wastes should:

·         be suitable for the substance they are holding, resistant to corrosion, maintained in a good condition, and securely closed:

·         have a capacity of less than 450 litres unless the specification have been approved by the EPD; and

·         display a label in English and Chinese in accordance with instructions prescribed in Schedule 2 of the Regulations.

 

 

 

 

6.3.12           The storage area for chemical wastes should:

·         be clearly labelled and used solely for the storage of chemical waste;

·         be enclosed on at least 3 sides;

·         have an impermeable floor and bunding, of capacity to accommodate 110% of the volume of the largest container or 20% by volume of the chemical waste stored in that area whichever is the greatest;

·         have adequate ventilation;

·         be covered to prevent rainfall entering (water collected within the bund must be tested and disposed as chemical waste if necessary); and

·         be arranged so that incompatible materials are adequately separated.

 

6.3.13           Disposal of chemical waste should:

·         be via a licensed waste collector; and

·         be to a facility licensed to receive chemical waste, such as the Chemical Waste Treatment Facility which also offers a chemical waste collection service and can supply the necessary storage containers, or

·         to be re-user of the waste, under approval from the EPD.

6.3.14           The Centre for Environmental Technology operates a Waste Exchange Scheme which can assist finding receivers or buyers for the small quantity of chemical waste to be generated from the project. 

General Refuse

6.3.15           General refuse should be stored in enclosed bins or compaction units separate from C&D materials and chemical wastes.  The Contractor should employ a reputable waste collector to remove general refuse from the project area, separate from C&D materials and chemical wastes, on a regular basis to minimise odour, pest and litter impacts.  Burning of refuse on construction sites is prohibited by law.

Construction Waste Management Plan

6.3.16           A construction waste management plan (CWMP) will need to be developed by the contractor to ensure proper collection, treatment and disposal of waste on site.  This CWMP will also take into account the requirement to provide chemical soil onsite which will need to be managed by a licensed waste collection contractor.


7.                      ECOLOGY

7.1                   Introduction

7.1.1              Apart from the residential development, a major objective of the Project is to restore wetland habitats within the project area. A Wetland Restoration Area (WRA) has been designated within the project area and the long-term management requirement have been detailed in the Wetland Restoration Plan.  The ecological assessment carried out in the EIA study has addressed the ecological consequences of the development and concluded that the overall impacts would be minor with a net ecological gain following completion of the project. Although some negative impacts are expected during the construction phase, with the early construction of the Wetland Restoration Plan (detailed in Appendix H in the final EIA report), these impacts shall be minimized.

7.2                   Mitigation Measures for Construction Phase

7.2.1              Mitigation measures were designed in accordance with Annex 16 of the TM on EIAO which states the general policy and guidance in planning of ecological mitigation measures. In particular, the following mitigation measures will be taken during construction and operation phases:

Mitigation Measures for Construction Phase

7.2.2              As the main ecological impacts are predicted to be wetland habitat loss and disturbance to wildlife during construction, the following mitigation measures would be implemented:

Clear Definition of Project Area Limit (Avoidance and Minimizing)

7.2.3              Clear definition of the project area limit should be provided in order to minimize and confine the disturbance during the construction period, especially the northern limit of the Project Area which is adjacent to fishponds within the Conservation Area (CA) zone and are considered to be ecological sensitive receivers.

7.2.4              During wetland construction stage the WRA boundary will be delineated using a temporary hoarding in order to reduce disturbance to off-site habitats and wildlife.  During the establishment phase this hoarding will be replaced with a 1 m high chain-link fence in order to reduce disturbance to the WRA through access by humans and dogs.

Dust and Noise Suppression and Avoidance of Water Pollution (Minimizing)

7.2.5              Good site practices of dust and noise suppression should be strictly implemented to ensure that disturbance is minimized to acceptable levels. Mitigation measures for the off-site disturbance impacts on the fishponds in the CA include hoarding at the northern project area boundary during construction of the WRA to reduce noise and dust impacts to the adjacent habitats. Through the use of quieter plant and temporary/movable noise barriers, the noise level would be reduced significantly to an acceptable level. Hoarding at the northern boundary should be replaced with a 1 m high chain-link fence following construction and the WRA will then act as a buffer between the existing wetland areas and the residential part of the project area until construction is completed.  Hoarding will be retained between the WRA and ongoing construction work to avoid visual disturbance and reduce noise and dust emissions.  Pollution of watercourses and sedimentary runoff will be minimized by good site practice, especially the containment of water and sediment within the site for removal. 

7.2.6              These standard noise and air and water quality site practices are considered to be effective measures for minimizing the disturbance impact during the construction period. Details of these mitigation measures are presented in Sections 2, 3 and 4 respectively.

Phasing of Construction Programme (Minimizing)

7.2.7              The construction of the proposed project should be scheduled in phases. Because mitigation is preferably carried out in advance of the main works rather than after the completion of works, the construction of the WRA will commence at the start of the project.  During the wetland establishment period, no noisy work will be undertaken within the WRA to minimize the disturbance to off-site habitats and wildlife. 

7.2.8              According to the proposed implementation programme (Figure 1.4), the construction of the WRA would be completed in the wet season of the first year, and a further one and a half years will be required to being full functioning. Construction work for the WRA will be conducted during the wet season to avoid the period of greatest abundance of disturbance-sensitive waterbirds.  During the establishment period, hoarding around the WRA will be removed so that the WRA will be able to integrate with adjacent wetlands and will provide a buffer from ongoing construction work.  Although construction work on other parts of the Project Area would give rise to some disturbance to the WRA, which may mean that the WRA is not functioning at full capacity (especially for waterbirds) during the establishment period, the WRA will still provide a level of ecological value for wildlife.

Reusing On-site Material (Minimizing)

7.2.9              Soil and plants on-site should be reused (e.g. used as fill material) as far as practical. Stock piles of these reusable materials should be stored in an appropriate area on-site to prevent sediment runoff into nearby watercourses. In particular, the re-use of the wetland soils and topsoil should be considered.

7.2.10           Taking into account the presence of the exotic weed species, which may serve as a seed bank for undesirable species, the topsoil from the main grassland area is not recommended for use in the Wetland Restoration Area for planting. This measure would help avoid adverse impacts from the colonization of undesirable plant species during the initial establishment of the vegetation in the WRA. However, the topsoil may be stored for use on the residential landscape areas, thus reducing the need to import materials from outside and reducing lorry miles.

7.2.11           Topsoil from the existing marsh, which contains a lower proportion of weed species, could be used on the proposed WRA, but this should be covered by a layer of  imported clean planting soil to ensure the negative impact of these weed species to be minimized.

Construction of the Wetland Restoration Area (Compensation)

7.2.12           The WRA should be fully operational within 2.5 years of commencement of construction (1 year for site formation, followed by 1.5 years for establishment and stabilization) and will then act as a buffer to screen the residential area from the Conservation Area to the north and also indirectly enhance the ecological function of the fishponds area in the CA zone by permanently removing those ecologically incompatible land uses such as open storage and lorry parking area adjoining the fishponds from the Project Area. Moreover, the habitats in the proposed WRA will provide roosting and feeding ground for not only the target species, but also a suite of species of conservation importance with similar habitats preferences. No operational impact on the offsite fishponds in the CA will therefore be identified.

Mitigation Measures for Operation Phase

Establishment of Wetland Restoration Area (Minimizing)

7.2.13           As discussed in Section 8 of the final EIA report, operational impacts include disturbance to wildlife and loss of habitat. Species that potentially receive significant impacts from the proposed development are Little Egret, Cattle Egret and Chinese Pond Heron.

7.2.14           The recommended mitigation measure to reduce/eliminate the impacts on these species is the provision of the WRA. The location of the WRA at the northern portion of the Project Area is selected in part to minimize impacts on bird flight paths and to buffer the existing wetland areas from the proposed residential areas, and also to allow better integration of the WRA with other wetland habitats.

7.2.15           The prime objectives of the proposed mitigation are to:

(i)    Protect the offsite wetland habitats in WCA / CA by avoiding a direct interface between these habitats and the proposed residential areas;

(ii)   Buffer off-site wetland habitats from the residential area and

(iii) Provide suitable habitats of enhanced quality for the target species.

7.2.16           These objectives can best be achieved by locating the WRA between the WCA/CA and residential areas to separate the two types of land use. In addition, the area of the existing lorry park site will be incorporated into the WRA to further enhance the buffer function.

7.2.17           The Wetland Restoration Area of a minimum size of 4.74 ha will be established as presented in Figure 7.1, to mitigate the loss of 4.69 ha of wetland habitats.  In addition to the habitat loss, the WRA is designed to mitigate for on-site and/or off-site disturbance during construction and operational phases as identified in Section 8 of the final EIA report. The habitats within the WRA will be designed specifically to meet the habitat requirements of the target species rather than simply restore specific habitats of ecological value.

7.2.18           Species considered to be targeted for the WRA have been selected by the following criteria: species of conservation importance which are utilizing the existing Project Area and where significant impacts are predicted in the absence of mitigation (species only recorded on occasion and with low to negligible impact are not included). Under these criteria, the target species are:

·         Little Egret, Cattle Egret and Chinese Pond Heron (total 3 bird species).

7.2.19           The following micro-habitats will be provided within the wetland restoration area to meet the requirements for the target species:

·         Open water up to 2.5 m in depth with shallow water margins (0-20 cm depth);

·         reedbed with shallow water margins (0-20 cm depth) and deeper water areas up (to 1 m depth);

·         vegetated and non-vegetated islands and shallow water margins (0-20 cm depth);

·         trees/tall shrubs overhanging parts of the main water body;

·         short grass; and

·         a mixture of tall grass and shrubs.

Open water

7.2.20           The project area will be formed to create a freshwater wetland comprising of four cells in order to facilitate water management, increase shallow water margins and allow access for management and monitoring.  Maximum operational water depths will be approximately 2.5 m, and about 75% of the open water areas will be less than 1.5 m.

 

Reedbed

7.2.21           Reedbed on the project area will form the majority of the vegetated area and will comprise areas with a maximum water depth of 1 m and extensive areas where water depths are less than 20 cm; these areas will be adjacent to, and continuous with, areas of open water which will have a maximum water depth on 2.5 m.  The distribution of reeds on site will be controlled to prevent the entire wetland body becoming a single reedbed.  This will be achieved by a rapid increase in water depth at the margins of the reeds to achieve a water depth of approximately 1.5 m – the depth at which reeds fail to grow.  Without such deeper areas reeds would rapidly colonise the entire wetland at the expense of open water areas, thus reducing habitat diversity.

               Vegetated and non-vegetated islands

7.2.22           Four islands will be constructed, one in each of the cells; two of these will be planted with tall trees and shrubs and two will be lined and covered with gravel to create non-vegetated islands (and to reduce colonisation by terrestrial vegetation).  All islands will be gently sloping and surrounded by shallow water less than 20 cm deep.

               Trees/tall shrubs

7.2.23           Woodland areas will be located mostly along the southern boundary of the wetland to form a buffer along the edge of the development area; these areas will be planted with tree and shrub species which are adapted to flooded conditions and waterlogged soils.

               Tall grass/shrubs

7.2.24           Such areas will be hydro-seeded and planted with low shrubs.  The grasses will be cut on a regular basis to maintain vegetation height at a suitably low level (< 0.5 m) and to prevent the colonisation of unwanted exotics.

               Short grass

7.2.25           Such areas will be hydro-seeded.  The grasses will be cut on a regular basis to maintain vegetation height at a suitably low level (< 0.2 m) and to prevent the colonisation of unwanted exotics.

Building Height with Consideration of Birds’ Flight Paths

7.2.26           Under the OZP for the area (OZP No. S/YL-MP/6) the maximum permitted height for buildings within the Project Area is six storeys.  This is considerably higher than the buildings at Palm Springs and Royal Palms residential estates, and would potentially impact the flight paths of birds over the Project Area.  To minimise such impacts the maximum height of buildings within the Project Area will be four storeys; such buildings will be generally three metres higher than existing buildings in adjacent residential estates.  Furthermore, the development has been zoned in such a way that the WRA is located adjacent to surrounding wetlands, and the lowest buildings on site will be those closest to the WRA.  This part of the project area is the most likely to be used by low-flying birds, and the reduction in building height will minimise potential impacts to flight paths.

7.2.27           There will be some residual impact to flight paths in the northern part of the Project Area during the construction phase of the WRA, resulting from the presence of construction machinery and from site fencing (required to avoid visual disturbance impacts to foraging waterbirds) and potentially also from noise disturbance.  These impacts will be limited in duration to the construction period of the WRA (scheduled to be completed in a single wet season), and the timing of the WRA formation at the start of the construction period will ensure that the duration of these construction-phase impacts to flight paths will be minimised.

7.3                 Monitoring Requirements

Baseline Ecological Monitoring

7.3.1              Baseline Ecological Monitoring was conducted during the preparation of the EcoIA for the proposed development; data collected during these surveys will provide the baseline for evaluation of the success in achieving numerical targets for the Target Species of the WRA.

Construction Phase Ecological Monitoring

7.3.2              Target species and certain other fauna will be monitored within the Project Area and Assessment Area during the wetland and residential construction phase.  This will be important to ensure that any unexpected events or impacts either on- or off-site are quickly identified so that remedial action can be taken.  The groups to be monitored and frequency of monitoring are shown in Table 7-1, and the methodology for each survey is detailed below under Operation Phase Monitoring. 

 

 


Table 71     Summary of Construction and Operational Phase Ecological Monitoring for the Wo Shang Wai WRA.

 

Construction Phase Ecological Monitoring

Operational Phase Ecological Monitoring

Birds

Weekly (including Assessment Area).

Monthly (excluding Assessment Area).

Dragonflies and Butterflies

Once per month during March and September to November, and twice per month during April to August.

Once per month during March and September to November, and twice per month during April to August.

Herpetofauna

Once per month during April to November.

Once per month during April to November.

Aquatic invertebrates

Not required.

At six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March).

Benthic Invertebrates

Not required.

At six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March).

Freshwater fish

Not required.

At six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March).

Habitat types

Not required.

At six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March).

Vegetation cover

Not required.

At six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March).

Pedology

Not required.

Yearly in the early wet season.

Water Quality

After filling of WRA with water, monthly for in situ water quality and every six months (end of the wet season and end of the dry season) for laboratory testing.

Monthly for in situ water quality and every six months (end of the wet season and end of the dry season) for laboratory testing.

Site Inspections

Weekly.

Twice per month.

Operation Phase Ecological Monitoring

              Monitoring will be conducted to cover the ecological attributes detailed below:

 

               Monitoring of target bird species

7.3.3              Monitoring of the 3 target bird species is required in order to demonstrate success in reaching the target of the recreated wetland supporting, as a minimum, the number of birds recorded during the Baseline Survey.

              Site transects

7.3.4              Surveys will be undertaken monthly. During each survey visit, the surveyor will walk slowly around the perimeter of the wetland and along each bund, and identify all birds to species level.  Surveys will commence within one hour of sunrise and last for approximately two hours.

 

Monitoring of Dragonflies and Butterflies

7.3.5              Transect surveys for dragonflies and butterflies will be undertaken once per month during March and September to November and twice per month during the peak period of dragonfly emergence in April to August. Survey duration will be approximately 2 hours, commencing at 08.00 hours.

7.3.6              During the surveys a fixed survey route will be followed. All dragonfly species observed will be identified and all sexually mature male and ovipositing female individuals counted. Dragonfly exuviae will be recorded qualitatively. Habitat use and breeding activity will be recorded, as well as evidence of breeding success in the form of final instar larval exuviae, which will be collected and identified. All butterfly species will be identified and numbers estimated quantitatively or semi-quantitatively.

7.3.7              For dragonflies, transect surveys will be supplemented by quantitative monitoring of emergence using exuviae emergence traps.  Six traps will be used and inspected one per week between March and August.

Monitoring of Herpetofauna

7.3.8              Herpetofauna surveys focus on breeding amphibians and the reptile community. One half-day day-time survey (primarily aimed at detecting reptiles) will be conducted each month between April and November. Surveys will take place during 10.00 – 14.00 hours, the peak period of reptile activity. One half-day night-time survey (primarily aimed at detecting breeding amphibians) will be conducted each month during the period from March to August. Night time surveys will be undertaken during 18.00 – 22.00 hours and focus on the detection of vocalising amphibians. During the surveys a fixed survey route will be walked. All reptiles and amphibians observed or heard will be identified, and their abundance estimated. Habitat use and breeding activity will be recorded.

Monitoring of Aquatic Invertebrates

7.3.9              Monitoring of aquatic invertebrates will be conducted at six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March). Sweep-netting will be used to sample aquatic species in the water column and clinging to vegetation at the water-bund interface. The sweep-net will be a D-shaped net of 30 cm diameter with a 1 mm mesh. Each sample will comprise two 2-metre sweeps of the net from which all captured specimens will be removed. The first sweep will be carried out at the water surface and the second as close to the wetland bed as possible. Each set of sweeps will be taken along the water-bund interface. Two randomly-located replicate samples will be taken from each cell (giving eight samples in total).

7.3.10           Samples will be placed in labelled containers together with preservative for transporting to the laboratory. Once in the laboratory, specimens will be rinsed in water, placed on a white sorting tray and sorted for identification to highest practical taxonomic level using a binocular microscope. Where partial body parts are identified, only heads will be counted.

7.3.11           The number of individuals of each macro-invertebrate taxon will be ascertained for each replicate sample for all taxa groups. A total dry weight biomass will be determined for each of the above groups.

 

7.3.12           The number and species of any fish captured incidentally during the sampling will be recorded.

Methodology for monitoring benthic invertebrates

7.3.13           Monitoring of benthic invertebrates will be conducted at six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March). Cylindrical benthic cores 10 cm in diameter and 10 cm in depth will be taken from the substrate at the base of the wetland to obtain quantitative data on benthic invertebrate populations. Five randomly located replicate cores will be collected from the shallows of each cell (with a total of 20 cores samples being collected). Core contents will be bagged and stored in a cooler for subsequent sorting. Samples will analysed in the same way as for sweep netting.

Methodology for monitoring freshwater fish and crustaceans

7.3.14           Monitoring of freshwater fish and crustaceans will be conducted at six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March). Throw and drag-netting will be undertaken in each cell. A fishing throw-net with a mesh size of 30 mm, a diameter of about 4 m and a surface area of about 14 m2 will be used to catch larger fish and a drag net of mesh size < 10 mm will be used to sample smaller fish and shrimps. Five randomly-placed replicates with each net will be conducted in each cell. Fish will be identified to species and the weight and length recorded (if fish length is greater than 10 cm).  All fish will be released back into the wetland.

Monitoring of habitats types

7.3.15           Habitat monitoring will be conducted at six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March).

               Monitoring of vegetation cover

7.3.16           Detailed floristic surveys will be conducted in each habitat type (reedbed, vegetated islands, tall trees/shrubs, tall grass/shrubs and short grass) at six monthly intervals at the end of the wet season (September) and the end of the dry season (March). Transects will run through each habitat area with a fixed number of quadrats in each.  10m x 10m quadrats will be used vegetated islands, in areas of tall trees/shrubs and tall grass/shrubs, while 2m x 2m quadrats in the habitats of reedbed and short grass.

7.3.17           Within each 10m x 10m quadrat, all plant species, including both planted and naturally-invaded species, will be identified to species level. Height, growth form and conditions of all woody plants will be measured and recorded. Any rare or protected species will also be identified.

7.3.18           Within each 2m x 2m quadrat, all plant species and their densities will be identified to species level and estimated respectively. The percentage cover of bare ground, leaf litter and each plant species within the quadrat will also be measured. The tallest height of each plant species will be measured to be the nearest cm. Any rare or protected species will also be identified within the quadrats.

 

Pedology Monitoring

7.3.19           Sediment in each cell will be monitored yearly in the early wet season. Three sediment samples will be collected from each cell and sent to a HOKLAS-accredited laboratory for analysis. The following parameters will be monitored:

 

·            % volatile solids

·            Oxidation/Reduction (Redox) potential

·            pH

·            Total nitrogen

·            Total oxidized carbon

·            Total phosphorus

·            Total reactive phosphorus

 

Monitoring of Water Quality

7.3.20           In-situ water quality will be measured in each cell once per month. The following parameters will be monitored:

 

·         Temperature

·         pH

·         Salinity

·         Turbidity

·         Dissolved oxygen

 

7.3.21           Additional measurements of these parameters should also be made as necessary in order to inform management decisions (e.g. fish re-stocking programme) and in response to unexpected events (e.g. algal blooms or fish die-offs).

7.3.22           In addition, every six months (end of the wet season and end of the dry season) water samples will be sent to a HOKLAS-accredited laboratory for analysis. The following parameters will be monitored:

 

·         Ammoniacal nitrogen

·         Biochemical oxygen demand

·         Total oxidized nitrogen

·         Total phosphorus

·         Total reactive phosphorus (orthophosphate)

General Condition Monitoring

7.3.23           Visual monitoring of habitat condition, flooding issues and significant litter or vandalism problems should be carried out during the daily security check and recorded in log books.  This information should be summarised in periodic monitoring reports and the appropriate action taken.

 

Resource Requirements Monitoring and Maintenance

7.3.24           Resources required should include qualified ecologists with professional qualifications in terrestrial ecology, a wetland ecology background, specialist identification skills in Hong Kong fauna and flora, and experience in ecological monitoring programmes.

7.4                   Wetland Quality Performance Limits and Action Plans

7.4.1              Proposed Wetland Quality Performance Limits and the corresponding Contingency Plans are presented in Table 7-2.

Table 72     Wetland Quality Performance Limits and Contingency Plan

Parameters

Action Level

Limit Level

Action

Flooding/storm damage

N.A.

N.A.

Review damage in conjunction with short-term weather forecast.  Shed water from project area if necessary or transfer internally if possible using combination of sluices, pipes and pumps.  Review damage, determine severity and undertake repairs/modifications to the design.

Area of water in the open water pond – wet season levels

< 70 & > 95%

< 60 & > 100 %

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: adjust water level by pumping to reinstate the area/ re-profiling/ other measures.

Area of water in the open water pond – dry season levels

< 50 & >95%

<40 & >95%

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: adjust water level by pumping to reinstate the area/ re-profiling/ other measures.

Emergent or floating vegetation in the open water pond (although it is not proposed to plant emergent or floating vegetation as part of the restoration process, it is to be expected that these will colonise the wetland over time)

> 10 %

> 20 %

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: manual or mechanical vegetation clearance; check nutrient levels and fish stocks; adjust water quality and fish numbers (in case water quality is affecting herbivorous fish stock levels or there are low levels of herbivorous fish).

Wooded island tree canopy cover

< 70%

< 50%

Action level exceedance: review tree status and growth. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented. Limit level exceedance: undertake supplemental tree planting.

Gravel island vegetation cover

> 20%

> 30%

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: manual or mechanical vegetation clearance.

Reedbed reed cover

< 80%

< 60%

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: carry out weeding or planting.

Reedbed water cover

< 25% & > 80%

<15% & > 95%

Action level exceedance: pump to restore water levels.

Limit level exceedance: pump to restore water levels; review water management regime in medium term.

Undesirable plant species (all wetland)

> 10% of vegetation in WRA or in any cell

> 20% of vegetation in WRA or in any cell

Action level exceedance: removal by weeding.

Limit level exceedance: removal by weeding, if problem is likely to return/deteriorate review design and management regime.

Undesirable fauna including invasive/exotic aquatic invertebrates

Presence

Negatively impacting wetland function

Action level exceedance: treatment or removal (or other method if suitable).

Limit level exceedance: increase frequency of treatment or removal (or other method if suitable), review management protocols and design.

Salinity

> 2 ppt

> 5 ppt

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: water exchange/ add water/ remove identified contamination source/ other measures.

pH

pH outside the range between 6.5 – 8.0

pH outside the range between 6.0 – 8.5

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: lime/ add peanut residue/ mix with other water sources/ drain and lime/ other measures.

Dissolved oxygen

< 2 mg/l

< 1 mg/l

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: pump and mix water/ aerate water/ remove identified contamination source/ other measures.

Total oxidized nitrogen (nitrite and nitrate) concentration

> 5 mg/l

> 10 mg/l

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: exchange water/ add water/ remove identified contamination source/ other measures.

Total phosphorus concentration

> 5 mg/l

> 10 mg/l

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: exchange water/ add water/ remove identified contamination source/ other measures.

Total ammonia concentration

> 3 mg/l

> 6 mg/l

Action level exceedance: double the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem. If the problem is likely to deteriorate, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be implemented.

Limit level exceedance: exchange water/ add water/ remove identified contamination source/ other measures.

Target species abundance

Abundances of all target species < specified target levels in two successive monitoring periods

Abundances of all target species < specified target levels in four successive monitoring periods

Action level exceedance: Review the monitoring data and reasons for low numbers of target species.  If the reduction in abundance is attributable to activities within the project area, stop/ reduce such activity or carry out other measures (e.g. erect buffering screen or buffer planting).  If the reduction in abundance is attributable to disturbance from outside the project area (e.g. intense construction activity outside the project area), increase buffering screen (short-term) and/or buffer planting (long-term) or carry out other measures.  If the reduction in abundance is attributable to external factors (e.g. natural population fluctuation) or other man-made factors increase the monitoring frequency, identify and review the problem, and review the management regime.  If the problem is likely to worsen, the action plan for limit level exceedance should be carried out.

Limit level exceedance:  Review the management regime and carry out restocking/ increase draining period and/or frequency/ erect buffering screen (short-term)/ increase buffer planting (long-term)/  other measures


8.                      FISHERIES

8.1.1              The Project will result in no temporary or permanent loss of fishponds. However, four actively managed fishponds adjoin the project area along the northern boundary.  Protection of these fishponds during construction phase will be controlled by good site practices as discussed in the recommended mitigation measures for air and water quality in Annex A. The assessment concluded that the construction and operation of the Project will not give rise to impacts to fisheries, as there is no predicted adverse impact to water quality or habitat loss.

8.1.2              The implementation of the air and water quality mitigation measure stated in Section 5 of the final EIA report should be checked as part of the environmental monitoring and audit procedures during the construction period. No other fisheries-specific measures or Environmental Monitoring and Audit Programme are considered necessary.


9.                      CULTURAL HERITAGE

9.1.1              From the surveys and examination of the records it was identified that no declared or deemed monuments or graded historical buildings were identified in the Assessment Area. Most houses within the Mai Po Village and Wo Shang Wai Village are modern houses and their ancestral halls are located at least 100m from the development project area. Fishpond features adjacent to the project area are of low landscape sensitivity. No construction activity which could result in vibration effects are planned for this Project.  Given the distance between the development project area and the Villages there is no anticipated effect on cultural heritage resources.

9.1.2              No impact (both construction and operation phase) on the villages was anticipated due to the large separation distance and thus no corresponding measures are required.


10.                 LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL

10.1               Introduction

10.1.1           The potential impacts on landscape and visual amenity come from construction works (including materials stockpiling, excavation, and other construction activities) as well as from built structures.  As the identified impacts are of limited significance, the recommended mitigation measures would be sufficient in rectifying the effects due to the development of the Project. Details of the mitigation measures suggested are listed below.

10.1.2           It is recommended that EM&A for landscape and visual resources is undertaken during the design, construction and operational phases of the Project.  The design, implementation and maintenance of landscape mitigation measures is a key aspect of this and should be checked to ensure that they are fully realised and that potential conflicts between the proposed landscape measures and any other project works and operational requirements are resolved at the earliest possible date and without compromise to the intention of the mitigation measures.  In addition, implementation of the mitigation measures recommended by the EIA shall be monitored through the site audit programme.

10.2               Mitigation Measures

10.2.1           The Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment recommended a series of mitigation measures to ameliorate the landscape and visual impacts of the Project.

10.2.2           The measures for both the construction and operation stage as recommended in the EIA report are summarized in Tables 10-1 and 10-2 below:

Table 101   Proposed Construction Phase Mitigation Measures