Civil Engineering and Development Department

Agreement No. CE 18/2012 (CE) Development of Anderson Road Quarry - Investigation

Environmental Impact Assessment Report

227724-REP-037-03

Final 3  |  June 2014

 


 

This report takes into account the particular
instructions and requirements of our client. 

It is not intended for and should not be relied
upon by any third party and no responsibility
is undertaken to any third party.

 

Job number    227724

 

 

Ove Arup & Partners Hong Kong Ltd

Level 5  Festival Walk

80 Tat Chee Avenue

Kowloon Tong

Kowloon

Hong Kong

www.arup.com

 

 

 


 

 

 


1                                INTRODUCTION

1.1                         Background

1.1.1                The Anderson Road Quarries have been in operation since 1956.  In 1998, the Central and East Kowloon Development Statement proposed new housing developments at a platform site covering about 40 ha of Anderson Road Quarries (the upper quarry site, now called the Anderson Road Quarry site, ARQ) and at an area west of Anderson Road covering about 20 ha (the lower quarry site, now called the Anderson Road Development, DAR).

1.1.2                The site formation works of the lower quarry site are now in progress under Contract No. CV/2007/03 ‘Development at Anderson Road – Site Formation and Associated Infrastructure Works’.

1.1.3                PlanD commissioned Arup on 27 January 2011 under Agreement No. CE 4/2010 (TP) to undertake a Planning Study on Future Land Use at Anderson Road Quarry (the Planning Study) to examine the future land use and explore the development potential of the upper quarry area. The recommendations and the Recommended Outline Development Plan (RODP) proposed under the Planning Study will provide the basis for the development at the ARQ.

1.1.4                CEDD commissioned Arup on 26 October 2012 under Agreement No. CE 18/2012 (CE) ‘Development of Anderson Road Quarry – Investigation’ to undertake the engineering feasibility study of the development proposals at the Anderson Road Quarry site recommended in the Planning Study and the associated road improvement works and pedestrian connectivity to Kwun Tong Town Centre and nearby MTR stations.

1.2                         Study Area

1.2.1                The Study Area, as delineated in Figure 227724/E/0001, is located on the south-western slopes of the Tai Sheung Tok at the far north-eastern edge of urban East Kowloon, and lies close to the major population centre of Kwun Tong, Lam Tin and Sau Mau Ping. Specifically, the Study Area covers an area of approx. 86 hectares, which includes a platform area of approx. 40 hectares.

1.3                         EIA Study Brief

1.3.1                In accordance with the requirements of Section 5(1) of the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance (EIAO), a project profile (No. PP-465/2012) for the Development of Anderson Road Quarry (the Project) was submitted to the Director of Environmental Protection (the “DEP”) for application for an EIA Study Brief on 8 May 2012. Pursuant to Section 5(7)(a) of the EIAO, the DEP has issued a Study Brief (No.: ESB-247/2012 dated 19 June 2012) for the EIA study.

1.3.2                The purpose of this EIA study is to provide information on the nature and extent of environmental impacts arising from the construction and operation of the Project and associated works that will take place concurrently. This information will contribute to decisions by the Director on:

(1)         the overall acceptability of any adverse environmental consequences that are likely to arise as a result of the Project;

(2)         the conditions and requirements for the detailed design, construction and operation of the Project to mitigate against adverse environmental consequences wherever practicable; and

(3)         the acceptability of residual impacts after the proposed mitigation measures are implemented.

1.4                         Designated Projects

1.4.1                The engineering feasibility study of the Project is a designated project (DP) under item 1 of Schedule 3 of the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance (EIAO), which specifies that “Engineering feasibility study of urban development projects with a study area covering more than 20 ha or involving a total population of more than 100,000”.

1.4.2                On the other hand, the Project also includes the proposed rock cavern development in the Study Area and the road improvement works at junction of (J/O) Lin Tak Road and Sau Mau Ping Road, at J/O Clear Water Bay Road and Road L1 of DAR, as well as at the merging lane at New Clear Water Bay Road near Shun Lee Tsuen Road. Classification of these projects as Schedule 2 DPs under the EIAO is detailed below:

Rock Cavern Developments (Figure 227724/E/0002)

1.4.3                The construction of the rock cavern developments would be a Schedule 2 DP under Item Q.2 of Schedule 2 of the EIAO:

Item Q.2 – Underground rock caverns

Road Improvement Works (Figure 227724/E/0002)

J/O Lin Tak Road and Sau Mau Ping Road

1.4.4                The scope of the proposed road improvement works at J/O Lin Tak Road and Sau Mau Ping Road include:

(1)         Widening of Lin Tak Road to single-2 lane with 2 nos. of long lay-by at each bound of the road to allow for kerb side activities (rock slope excavation is required for the road widening works).

(2)         Construction of a new flyover overpassing the junction of Sau Mau Ping Road, Lin Tak Road and Tseung Kwan O Road for the traffic from Lin Tak Road to Sau Mau Ping Road.

1.4.5               One of the key elements of this proposed works is to construct and operate a new vehicular bridge connecting Lin Tak Road and Sau Mau Ping Road and across Tseung Kwan O Road. Since both Lin Tak Road and Sau Mau Ping Road are classified as District Distributor (DD), this proposed new vehicular bridge is also a District Distributor and its construction and operation is therefore a Designated Project (DP) under Item A.1 of Schedule 2 of the EIAO:

Item A.1 – A road which is an expressway, trunk road, primary distributor road or district distributor road including new roads, and major extensions or improvements to existing road.

J/O Clear Water Bay Road and Road L1 of DAR

1.4.6                The scope of the proposed works include a new westbound carriageway of the Clear Water Bay Road and a new U-turn facility with associated cutting of existing slopes with heavy vegetation.

1.4.7                One of the key elements of the proposed works is to construct and operate a new road section (approximately 200m long) on the westbound carriageway of Clear Water Bay Road to replace the existing road section. Since Clear Water Bay Road is a Primary Distributor, this proposed new road section is also a Primary Distributor and its construction and operation is therefore a DP under Item A.1 of Schedule 2 of the EIAO.

Merging lane at New Clear Water Bay Road near Shun Lee Tsuen Road

1.4.8                The scope of the proposed works is to widen a section of 130m length of the existing New Clear Water Bay Road westbound carriageway opposite to Shun Lee Estate from one lane to two lanes, and to construct a new Shun Lee Tsuen Road slip road within the area of an existing slope to increase the merging length and to improve the sight line for traffic from Shun Lee Tsuen Road. Slope works and retaining walls are required for the new slip road.

1.4.9                One of the key elements of the proposed works is to construct and operate a new slip road (approximately 350m long) and a merging lane (approximately 170m long) extending from the existing Shun Lee Tsuen Road and merging to the westbound carriageway of New Clear Water Bay Road. Since both Shun Lee Tsuen Road and New Clear Water Bay Road are Primary Distributors, the proposed new merging lane is also a Primary Distributor and its construction and operation is therefore a DP under Item A.1 of Schedule 2 of the EIAO.

1.5                         Further EIA Study for the Schedule 2 DPs

Rock Cavern Development

1.5.1                A review of the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rock cavern development is given under the section titled Environmental Acceptability of Schedule 2 Designated Projects in all technical chapters. It is concluded that no insurmountable environmental impacts arise from the rock cavern developments are anticipated. Since the rock caverns are proposed for commercial use (e.g. food and beverage) as well as museum according to the best available information at this stage, the associated environmental impacts due to these commercial activities are also anticipated to be insignificant.

1.5.2                Nevertheless, the detailed environmental implications of this Schedule 2 DP will be further investigated in a separate EIA under EIAO.

Road Improvement Works

1.5.3                A review of the potential environmental impacts of the proposed road improvement works is given under the section titled Environmental Acceptability of Schedule 2 Designated Projects in all technical chapters. It is concluded that no insurmountable environmental impacts arise from the road improvement works are anticipated.

1.5.4                Nevertheless, the detailed environmental implications of this Schedule 2 DP will be further investigated in a separate EIA under EIAO.

1.6                         Pedestrian Connectivity

1.6.1                Under the Planning Study, pedestrian connectivity (as shown in Figure 227724/E/0008) with lift tower and escalators have been recommended to connect the proposed development at the ARQ to adjoining districts.

1.6.2                During the construction phase, construction dust and noise would be the major environmental impacts associated with the construction of the pedestrian links. However, since the extents of the works are limited and the works are relatively minor, with the implementation of good site practices (e.g. watering and coverage of dusty materials, use of quiet plant and temporary noise barrier, etc.), no insurmountable environmental impacts are anticipated during the construction phase.

1.6.3                As the proposed pedestrian links are located within developed areas and it is designed for pedestrian use only, no insurmountable environmental impacts are anticipated during the operational phase.

1.7                         Objectives of the EIA

1.7.1                  The objectives of the EIA study are as follows:

(1)         to describe the Project and associated works together with the requirements and environmental benefits for carrying out the Project and the types of designated projects to be covered by the Project;

(2)         to identify and describe elements of community and environment likely to be affected by the Project and/or likely to cause adverse impacts to the Project, including natural and man-made environment and the associated environmental constraints;

(3)         to provide information on the consideration of alternative options of the Project including alternative scale/size, extent, layout, configuration/orientation, alignment, design and construction methods with a view to avoiding and minimizing potential environmental impacts to environmentally sensitive areas and sensitive uses, including but not limited to the Development at Anderson Road (DAR), Tai Sheung Tok Hill, the adjacent major population centres of Kwun Tong, Lam Tin and Sau Mau ping; to compare the environmental benefits and dis-benefits of different options; to provide reasons for selecting the preferred option(s) and to describe the part environmental factors played in the selection of preferred option(s);

(4)         to identify and quantify emission sources, including air and gaseous emission, noise emission, sewage and wastewater emission, waste generation, contaminated materials, and determine the significance of impacts on sensitive receivers and potential affected uses;

(5)         to identify and qualify any potential losses or damage to flora, fauna and natural habitats;

(6)         to identify any potential landscape and visual impacts and to propose measures to mitigate these impacts;

(7)         to propose the provision of infrastructure or mitigation measures so as to minimize pollution, environmental disturbance and nuisance during construction and operation of Project;

(8)         to investigate the feasibility, practicability, effectiveness and implications of the proposed mitigation measures;

(9)         to identify, predict and evaluate the residual environmental impacts (i.e. after practicable mitigation) and the cumulative effects expected to arise during the construction and operation phases of the Project in relation to the sensitive receivers and potential affected uses;

(10)     to identify, assess and specify methods, measures and standards, to be included in the detailed design, construction and operation of the Project which are necessary to mitigate these environmental impacts and cumulative effects and reduce them to acceptable levels;

(11)     to investigate the extent of the secondary environmental impacts that may arise from the proposed mitigation measures and to identify constraints associated with the mitigation measures recommended in the EIA study, as well as the provision of any necessary modification;

(12)     to identify, any individual project(s) (including road improvement works, rock cavern development and quarry rehabilitation work, etc) that fall under Schedule 2 of the EIAO; to ascertain whether the findings of this EIA study have adequately addressed the environmental impacts of those projects; and where necessary, to identify the outstanding issues that need to be addressed in any further detailed EIA study for application of environmental permits; and

(13)     to design and specify environmental monitoring and audit requirements to ensure the effective implementation of the recommended environmental protection and pollution control measures.

1.8                         Structure of this EIA Report

1.8.1                  The structure of this EIA report is outlined below for ease of reference.

Section

Title

Aims

1

Introduction

Introduces the background information and the layout of the EIA Report

 

2

Study Scope

Outlines the objectives and scope for various environmental aspects

 

3

Alternative Options

Summarises the various options considered and the main reasons for adopting the scheme recommended

 

4

Air Quality Impact Assessment

Presents the legislation, methodology, assessment and recommendations for air quality impacts

 

5

Noise Impact Assessment

Presents the legislation, methodology, assessment and recommendations for noise impacts

 

6

Water Quality Impact Assessment

Presents the legislation, methodology, assessment and recommendations for water quality impacts

 

7

Sewerage and Sewage Treatment Implication

Presents the legislation, methodology, assessment and recommendations for sewerage and sewage treatment implications

 

8

Waste Management Implications

Presents the legislation, methodology, assessment and recommendations for waste management

 

9

Land Contamination

Presents the legislation, methodology, assessment and recommendations for land contamination

 

10

Ecological Impact

Presents the legislation, methodology, assessment and recommendations for marine ecological impacts

 

11

Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment

Presents the legislation, methodology, assessment and recommendations for landscape and visual impacts

 

12

EM&A Requirements

Presents the EM&A requirements

13

Summary of Environmental Outcomes

Presents a summary of the key environmental outcomes arising from the EIA study

 

14

Conclusion

Summarises the findings and concludes the overall acceptability of the project

 


2                                SCOPE OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT STUDY

2.1.1                  According to EIA Study Brief (ESB247-2012), the EIA study shall address the likely key issues described below, together with any other key issues identified during the course of the EIA study:

(1)         the potential air quality impact on sensitive receivers from the construction and operation of the Project and associated works; and the potential air quality impacts on air sensitive uses in the assessment area due to air pollutant emission sources identified according to section 3.4.3.2 of this study brief;

(2)         the potential noise impact on sensitive receivers caused by the Project and associated works, including the impact from construction equipments during construction and operational noise impact from road traffic, fixed noise sources in particular ventilation shafts, pump houses, electricity sub-stations, bus termini, open car/lorry parks, refuse handling areas;

(3)         the potential water quality impact caused by the Project and associated works, such as sewage discharge from construction workforce and the development from the Project and associated works;

(4)         the potential sewerage and sewage treatment implications to cope with discharges from residential, commercial and institutions buildings as well as any development from the Project, taking into account the capacity requirements for the existing, committed and planned developments in the vicinity of the Project;

(5)         the potential waste management implication arising from the construction of the Project, including handling and disposal of construction and demolition materials, chemical waste and general refuse;

(6)         the potential land contamination issue within the Project site;

(7)         the potential landscape and visual impacts caused by construction and operation of the Project and associated works on sensitive receivers in the vicinity, such as those visually sensitive receivers at surrounding public housing estates, Kwun Tong district, northern shoreline of Hong Kong Island, etc.;

(8)         the potential impact on ecological sensitive areas, the assessment of which shall be based on a field survey of at least 4 months; and

(9)         the potential cumulative environmental impacts of the Project, through interaction or in combination with other existing, committed and planned projects in the vicinity of the Project, and that those impacts may have a bearing on the environmental acceptability of the Project.



3                                PROJECT DESCRIPTION

3.1                         General Description of the Project

3.1.1                The Project comprises the development of ARQ into a housing development area, with associated supporting infrastructure within the boundary of ARQ and access roads leading to the adjacent neighbourhood, including but not limited to the new access routes leading to Po Lam Road and DAR.

3.2                         Need for the Project

3.2.1                In the Policy Address 2010/11, the Chief Executive expressed Government’s intention to make land available for an average of 20,000 new private units per year in the next 10 years and 15,000 Public Rental Housing (PRH) units per year, together with a total of 5,000 “My Home Purchase Plan (MHPP)” units and 5,000 Home Ownership Scheme flats per year. In previous consultation with Kwun Tong and Sai Kung District Councils during the Planning Study, members agreed that residential developments should be provided at the Study Area to meet the need on housing. Since the Study Area consists of a development platform of approximately 40 ha in area and in close proximity to urban area in Kwun Tong, it has a high potential to fulfil the territorial housing demand and can also act as a solution space for accommodating district-wide Government, Institution or Community (G/IC) provision.

Predicted Future Environment without Project

3.2.2                Due to its use as a quarry site, ARQ is a highly disturbed environment where ecological value is considered to be minimal. Under the rehabilitation contract (No. GE/96/10), the landscape of the quarry will be rehabilitated through extensive tree and shrub plating on exposed rock face.

3.2.3                Without the proposed development, the planting established under the rehabilitation contract will, though gradually, begins to mature. Some habitats may be expected to increase in ecological value in future as a result of ecological succession (for example the maturation of shrubland into woodland).

3.2.4                However, without the proposed development, the Study Area will be left as an extensive vacant government land. The opportunity to fulfil the social needs of the local community and to enhance local economy through the creation of recreational space, tourist development and G/IC facilities in the Study Area will be lost. It will also be difficult to meet the housing demand within the urban area for which alternative sites with similar development potential is unlikely to be available in the vicinity.

3.3                         Recommended Outline Development Plan

Development Opportunities and Constraints

3.3.1                Development constraints and opportunities of the Study Area are summarised below:

Development Opportunities

3.3.2                The central area of the quarry platform is within easy reach from different parts of the Study Area and is closest to DAR both horizontally and vertically. It has the potential of becoming the most vibrant part of the Study Area in the future. It is also where the major view corridor between Jordan Valley and Tai Sheung Tok summit runs through. Therefore, both the land uses and the massing of buildings should respond to this specific site context, which include lowering the building height profile to preserve the visual corridor and enhancing spatial and visual connections with the district open space in DAR etc.

3.3.3                The accessible part of the rock face, which includes part of the platform reserved for the Water Supplies Department, the 20m-wide landscape strip at +250mPD, and the 8m-wide landscape strips at +210mPD, +230mPD, +310mPD, +330mPD, and the 1m-wide maintenance access to the Tai Sheung Tok summit, can potentially be served as recreational areas such as hiking trails and viewing platforms.

3.3.4                While the rock face is generally regarded as non-development area, the summit, the 20m-wide bench at +250mPD and the crescent-shape rock face on the north-eastern end of the Study Area are potential sites for minor structures that would enhance the recreational values of the Study Area. The summit offers a panoramic view of Tai Sheung Tok and can potentially serve as the best look-out point in Kowloon East. The 20m-wide bench provides a potential site for recreational uses. With its gentler slope and higher accessibility, the crescent-shape rock face can potentially be developed together with the northern part of the platform in order to create visual, spatial and functional interests.

Development Constraints

3.3.5                The general fill materials above the drop cuts are weaker than in-situ soil and rock materials and hence results in additional costs on foundation structure.

3.3.6                New foundation shall be avoided on the identified fault zone to prevent construction difficulties.

3.3.7                The final faces of the rock slopes are not provided with preventive measures against detachment of loose rock fragments. A buffer zone subject to rock fall assessment, or measures such as rock net shall be considered.

3.3.8                New foundation adjacent to the crests of the slopes along Anderson Road shall be designed with caution to avoid transfer of load to the slope surface and unstabilise the slope.

3.3.9                The development potential of the Study Area is restricted by the capacity of the sewerage system.

3.3.10           There are great concerns regarding the traffic situation in the area, and traffic congestion problems are being experienced at three key junctions i.e. New Clear Water Bay Road/ Lung Cheung Road, New Clear Water Bay Road/ Lee On Road and New Clear Water Bay Road/ Clear Water Bay Road and other local roads in Kwun Tong such as Hip Wo Street. It is generally believed that the road capacity is inadequate to sustain large-scale development unless feasible and acceptable improvement schemes/ road infrastructure can be worked out and implemented.

3.3.11           Accessibility for pedestrian commuting between DAR/ the Study Area and Kwun Tong town centre should also be fully considered with a view to formulating feasible and acceptable proposals to address the public concerns.

3.3.12           Two on-site storage tanks are needed to attenuate the increase in surface runoff due to the development of the Study Area. Additional fresh water and salt water pumping stations/ service reservoirs will also be required to ensure adequate supply of the potable and salt water supply for the Study Area. Land within the Study Area will need to be reserved for these facilities.

Initial Land Use Options

3.3.13           In light of capitalising on the strategic location and local character, meeting strategic housing demands and enhancing social mix, provision of G/IC facilities to meet existing shortfalls and community aspirations, enhancing recreational, tourism and economic vibrancy, three initial land use options are proposed as summarised below:

(1)         Option 1 can be understood as an “urban oasis”. It has a lower development intensity and population, with a target population of 22,000 and a private-to-subsidised housing ratio of 60:40. However, it has more recreational facilities and greening measures to create a sustainable and liveable community. Moreover, with its sheer size, the Quarry Park is expected to stand out as a major attraction in Hong Kong for both local residents and tourists.

(2)         Option 2 can be understood as an “urban destination”. Its target population is 25,000 and a private-to-subsidised housing ratio of 70:30. Although it has less population than Option 3 (i.e. 30,000), it has a larger private housing population and correspondingly a higher income and expenditure level which is expected to foster local economic development. Besides, the hotel, conferencing, recreational, entertainment and cultural elements are expected to creating a vibrant destination that contributes to both local and territory economic development.

(3)         Option 3 can be understood as an “urban extension”. Its target population is 30,000, and a private-to-subsidised housing ratio of 70:30. This option targets on maximising housing provisions to meet territorial needs. Land is also reserved for a large-scale institutional building such as medical or educational facilities to serve both local and territorial needs. This option represents a pragmatic use of land resources to fulfil immediate societal needs.

3.3.14           The environmental performance of the 3 initial use options has been assessed in the preliminary feasibility assessment under the Planning Study (Working Paper 4 on Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Initial Options), it was concluded that, in terms of environmental performance, Option 2 is the least favourable option whilst Option 1 is the most favourable. This is mainly due to the relatively small population and low development of commercial activities in Option 1. A comparison of the 3 initial land use options in terms of environmental performance is given in Table 3.1 below. 

Table 3.1: Comparison of the environmental performance of the 3 land use options

Environmental Aspects

Land Use Options

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Conservation, Environment & Agriculture

Criteria air pollutants

Quantity of gaseous and particulate pollutants emitted per annum

2

Option with the least population (22,000), extensive greening and sizable parkland, low emissions.

3

Option with population of 25,000. Development promotes

3

Option with the highest pop of 30,000. With more GIC facilities such as hospital and community college.

Sources of air pollutants from this project

2

Option with the lowest development

4

Option involving the highest commercial activities

3

Option with the most residential development

Freshwater supplied and consumed

Amount of freshwater supplied and consumed per capita

2

Option with the lowest commercial/ catering activities

4

Option with the most commercial/ catering activities

3

Option with some commercial/ catering activities

Terrestrial habitat

Negative impacts on managed terrestrial habitat for conservation

3

Existing natural setting of quarry face will be maintained

3

Existing natural setting of quarry face will be maintained

3

Existing natural setting of quarry face will be maintained

Toxic air pollutants

Amount of air pollutants that cause serious health risk, e.g. cancer, lung damage

3

Option has no activities involving toxic air pollution

3

Option has no activities involving toxic air pollution

3

Option has no activities involving toxic air pollution

Significant Landscape Features (area-based)

Area of special urban/ rural landscape features affected

3

Existing natural setting of quarry face will be maintained

3

Existing natural setting of quarry face will be maintained

3

Existing natural setting of quarry face will be maintained

Significant Landscape Features (area-based)

Number of special urban/ rural landscape features affected

3

Existing natural setting of quarry face will be maintained

3

Existing natural setting of quarry face will be maintained

3

Existing natural setting of quarry face will be maintained

Energy

CO2 emissions

Quantity of CO2 emitted per annum

2

Option with the lowest residential and commercial development

4

Option involving mid population size and highest commercial activities

3

Option with the most residential developments and most GIC activities

Transport

Excessive noise

Percentage of population exposed to excessive noise

3

Mitigation measures will be incorporated into the design if noise becomes an issue

3

Mitigation measures will be incorporated into the design if noise becomes an issue

3

Mitigation measures will be incorporated into the design if noise becomes an issue

Travel distance

Commute distance during morning peak hour

3

The external transport strategy would be the same for all options

3

The external transport strategy would be the same for all options

 

3

The external transport strategy would be the same for all options

Travel speed

Negative impacts on the average network speed across all major groups of passenger transport modes during morning peak hour

1

This option offers the least traffic impact during peak hour due to the highest population

3

This option offers some traffic impact during peak hour. Commercial activities are not expected to create significant impact during morning peak hours

5

This option offers the most traffic impact during peak hour due to the highest population

Waste & Wastewater

Construction waste

Amount of construction waste disposed per capita

2

Option with the lowest residential and commercial development

3

Option involving mid residential and highest commercial activities

3

Option with the most residential developments and most GIC activities

Municipal waste

Amount of municipal waste disposal per capita

1

Option with the lowest residential and commercial development

5

Option involving mid residential and highest commercial activities

3

Option with the most residential development and most GIC activities

Landfill capacity

Waste generation

2

Option with the lowest residential and commercial development

3

Option involving mid residential and highest commercial activities

3

Option with the most residential development and most GIC activities

Obstacles to incorporating waste recycling facilities

3

Waste recycling should be incorporated into the new development

3

Waste recycling should be incorporated into the new development

3

Waste recycling should be incorporated into the new development

Score of Environmental Indicators

48

66

62

Notes:

[1]       Each option is rated on a scale of 1 to 5 for each indicator, with 1 representing “lowest/ least” and “highest/ most”. In general, a LOWER score corresponds to more favourable performance in a certain aspect and vice versa.


 

3.3.15           Nevertheless, taking into account the various broad technical assessments of the 3 initial land use options, including traffic, engineering and geotechnical aspects, it was concluded that the developments and infrastructures proposed for these initial options are broadly feasible with appropriate improvement/ mitigation measures.

3.3.16           Since the variations of the 3 initial land use options (i.e. Options 1, 2 and 3) are not very significant, it was subsequently decided that the 3 initial land use options be consolidated into two modified Initial Options, with population threshold ranging from 22,000 to 30,000 and reduced commercial/ tourism elements. The two modified Initial Options largely represent the simplified versions of Options 1 and 3.

3.3.17           As the development parameters of the 2 modified Initial Options are similar to/ smaller than the 3 initial land use options studied, it was decided appropriate to put forward the 2 modified Initial Options for public consultation. The design concepts of the two modified Initial Options are summarised below:

Modified Initial Options

Modified Initial Option 1

(1)         To provide a Quarry Park of more than 15 hectares with different recreational and sports facilities, and a green promenade along the southwestern edge of the Study Area. The Park will provide a good leisure destination for the residents in Kwun Tong, Sai Kung or even the whole Territory during weekends and holidays.

(2)         To create a leisure and entertainment centre with retail, dining and entertainment facilities along the central axis of the Study Area and connected to the Quarry Park. The area will be pedestrianised to avoid conflicts between the pedestrian and vehicular traffic.

(3)         To construct an elevated viewing deck with dining services on the bench at the level of +250mPD to allow visitors to enjoy the spectacular view of Kowloon East and the Victoria Harbour.

(4)         To limit part of the residential district in the northwestern portion of the Study Area to medium-rise buildings to complement the open setting of the Quarry Park.

(5)         To preserve the visual permeability between the Tai Sheung Tok summit and Jordan Valley.

Modified Initial Option 2

(1)          To designate the central part of the Study Area primarily for community facilities and open space, and two sites will be reserved for commercial development. The open-air civic/event plaza at the centre will provide a gathering place for local residents.

(2)         To reserve more land for G/IC facilities to meet the shortfalls in the district in addition to meeting the local needs.

(3)         To incorporate day-to-day shopping and community facilities within the residential developments for the convenience of the local residents.

(4)         To connect major pedestrian paths from DAR to the basement of the G/IC building within the Study Area.

(5)         To preserve the visual permeability between Tai Sheung Tok summit and Jordan Valley.

Stage 1 Community Engagement

3.3.18             The modified Initial Options 1 and 2 were put forward for consultation during the Stage 1 Community Engagement (CE) from August to November 2011. Public views collected are summarised below:

(1)         Planned Population Generally commenters had no strong views on the range of the planned population for the balance between providing housing units and achieving a quality living environment.

(2)         Housing Mix – The public called for the provision of residential units to meet the territorial demand. Commenters also sought variety in subsidised housing provision in the Study Area.

(3)         Land UseThe majority of commenters supported the land uses for residential, commercial, open space and G/IC uses to be planned in the 40-ha platform area. Among the commenters who made comparison of the two modified Initial Options, more preferred Option 1 with the provision of a quarry park. The idea of setting up a museum showcasing the history of the quarry site was also widely proposed. As for the modified Initial Option 2, which provided more land reserved for G/IC uses, the majority of commenters supported the idea of providing local and regional G/IC uses to address the existing shortage of community facilities and to serve the future needs of residents in the Study Area and Kwun Tong District.

(4)         Urban DesignPreservation of the Tai Sheung Tok hill ridgeline was widely supported. The development intensity within the Study Area had to achieve a quality living environment and at the same time create a harmonious built environment with the adjacent DAR.

(5)         Use of Rock FaceCommenters agreed that the rock face and the benches on it are the unique geological features of the Study Area. A design competition could be held to invite innovative design proposals for the rock face. Activities such as rock climbing with rock faces as the backdrop were also proposed. Facilities such as viewing decks, restaurants, souvenir shops, etc. could be provided to enhance the attractiveness of this destination.

(6)         Use of Rock Cavern – The public suggested two major groups of facilities to be potentially housed in rock caverns i.e. commercial and NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) type of G/IC facilities e.g. sewage treatment facilities to reduce their impacts on the neighbourhood.

(7)         Traffic and Transport – Commenters generally expressed concerns on the worsening traffic conditions in Kwun Tong brought by the proposed developments. In light of the large population in the Study Area and DAR, it was considered justifiable to have a new MTR station serving the surrounding communities. Environmentally-friendly transport modes such as electric vehicles, monorails, etc were also proposed. Traffic management measures should also be introduced to reduce the possible traffic impacts.

(8)         Pedestrian Connection – The proposed pedestrian connections between the Study Area and DAR are considered appropriate. To cope with the steep gradient between the two sites, lift towers and escalators were considered important to facilitate the pedestrian flow. Funicular was also proposed to connect between the Study Area and DAR, as well as between the platform area and the benches. In addition, it was opined that pedestrian connections should link the Study Area to developments further downhill all the way to Kwun Tong MTR Station through escalator systems, travellators, monorails, etc. The proposed new hiking trails from Tai Sheung Tok to the Wilson Trail Stage 3 for strengthening the connection between the Study Area and the countryside in Sai Kung were supported.

Draft Recommended Outline Development Plan (RODP)  

3.3.19           Based on the comments from the Stage 1 CE and the subsequent refinements in response to further discussions with several government departments, a draft RODP with the objectives to establish a comprehensive framework to guide future development of the Study Area was formulated based on the following 5 Development Principles:

(1)         Development Principle 1 – Providing a green and sustainable environment

(2)         Development Principle 2 – Capitalising the Study Area to meet territorial needs for housing provision without overburdening the transport and infrastructural capacity

(3)         Development Principle 3 – Enhancing social mix and harmony in Kwun Tong district

(4)         Development Principle 4 – Meeting local aspirations and needs in provision of community facilities

(5)         Development Principle 5 – Respecting local character and making use of existing landform for tourism and recreational development

Delineation of Areas

3.3.20           The land use recommended in the draft RODP is formulated based on the combined considerations of the Development Principles and the urban design concepts and can be broadly divided into four areas i.e. Civic Core, Northern Community, Southern Community, and Recreation Network:

(1)         Civic Core – as a communal space for both the Study Area and the wider Sau Mau Ping area. It includes two commercial sites intended for shopping facilities, a government site intended for sport facilities, a pedestrian corridor, and a hard-paved plaza.

(2)         Northern Community – formed by six private residential sites surrounding a “communal spine” comprising a primary school, a government or institution/ community site of undesignated uses, the upper plaza and a pedestrian corridor.

(3)         Southern Community – formed by a mix of three larger private residential sites and a subsidised housing site. These sites are intertwined with a primary school, a secondary school, a community hall cum social service facilities and an open space forming an entry point to the hiking trail network on the rock face. A fire station, a police station and a refuse collection point is also planned in this area.

(4)         Recreation Network – The Recreation Network comprises the proposed Quarry Park (both on the platform and the rock face) and the hiking trail network with lookouts, café, restaurants and retail stalls in rock cavern. In addition to the mechanical transport system, a series of hiking trails comprising footpaths and stairs are proposed on the rock face to provide a sequential experience for visitors.

Proposed Development Intensity

3.3.21           A population target of 23,000 is proposed under the draft RODP. In view of the high percentage of PRH in the surrounding of the Study Area including DAR and Sau Mau Ping areas, the proposed private-to-subsidised housing ratio in the Study Area is 80:20 in terms of the number of residents. The proposed housing mix is adopted with a view to providing more private housing and introducing greater social mix to enhance demographic diversity while offering some subsidised housing to meet the territorial housing demand.

3.3.22           Given the height restriction for protecting visual access to the ridgeline, developments for the subsidised housing which has an area of about 1.44 ha are subject to a maximum domestic plot ratio of 6, whilst the maximum domestic plot ratio for private housing is proposed to range form 3.5 – 5.5 with an average of approx. 4.0.

Stage 2 Community Engagement

3.3.23           The draft RODP was subsequently put forward for the Stage 2 CE conducted between June and September 2012. The major public comments received are summarised below:

(1)         Planned Population and Development Intensity – There was no strong objection to the proposed development intensity though some consultees opined that the scale of the proposed development should be reduced to lessen future traffic demand. On the other hand, there were also views for increasing the plot ratios of the proposed residential sites to provide more housing supply.

(2)         Housing Mix – In general, there was no strong objection to the proposed private-to-subsidised housing ratio of 80:20, though several consultees considered that the ratio for public housing should be increased to help address the need of the low income groups.

(3)         Land Use and Layout – The proposed quarry museum was generally supported, and no objection to the proposed Quarry Park was received. Some other land uses were suggested by the members of the public, including more commercial facilities, GIC facilities, tourism facilities, community farm, etc. Also there was a view that commercial facilities should also be provided within the two residential communities instead of concentrating in the Civil Core.

(4)         Rock Face – The proposed hiking trails, lookouts and vertical transportation system were supported. Nevertheless, the hiking trails should have more connections with the existing Wilson Trail in Sai Kung while seats with shelters should be provided at the lookouts. Some innovative ideas for the rock face were received though there was also view to preserve the existing rough topography and visual prominence of Tai Sheung Tok. As such, overuse of concrete, exotic rocks and man-made structures on the rock face should be avoided.

(5)         Traffic Issues – Many consultees considered that the existing road network in the area would be unable to cater for the cumulative traffic impacts to be generated from DAR and the proposed developments at the Study Area. The proposed pedestrian linkages to Kwun Tong town centre were generally appreciated, though some consultees had reservation on their effectiveness because of the long walking distance.

Finalisation of the RODP

3.3.24           In response to the comments received from the Stage 2 CE, some major adjustments to the draft RODP have been made as detailed below.

Major Planning Parameters

3.3.25           The target population is increased by 2,000 from 23,000 to 25,000. In order to accommodate the increase in population, the draft RODP was revised based on the increased planned population 25,000. The development intensities of some residential sites are slightly modified including an increase in the domestic plot ratio for subsidised housing site from 6 to 6.3, and in the average plot ratio for private housing sites from 4 to 4.2.

3.3.26             Nevertheless, despite the slight increase in development intensity, key government institution and community (G/IC) facilities and open space provision for the local population would be maintained.

Traffic and Transport Facilities

3.3.27           A comprehensive pedestrian system with suitable mechanically-assisted facilities is proposed. To enhance the linkage established under the DAR study, this assessment further identified the routes to link up the pedestrian network with Kwun Tong town centre through four new routes of footbridges with lift towers and escalators. These pedestrian linkages supplement the traffic and transport plans to improve access to the external public transport facilities.

3.3.28           In meeting the planning and district demand, a Public Transport Interchange (PTI) that could accommodate around 4-6 bus bays, 3-4 GMB bays and 2 taxi bays are proposed. It is estimated that a total site area of around 4,500 sq.m will be required to accommodate this PTI. In order to supplement some of the shortfall in the district in providing terminating facilities for PT services, a road-side public transport termini (PTT) is provided at the road connecting to DAR.

Further Adjustments based on Engineering Investigation Study Findings

3.3.29           A RODP was put forward in March 2013 incorporating comments received from the Stage 2 CE. However, during the course of the Investigation Study further adjustment was made to the RODP including modification of the access road to Po Lam Road southeast of the Study Area from open road to underpass and deletion of one of the drainage retention tanks. Detailed justifications for these amendments are given in Section 3.7.  

3.3.30             Figure 227724/E/0003 presents the final RODP incorporating adjustments based on the Stage 2 CE comments and the findings of the Investigation Study. A summary of the major planning parameters proposed in the final RODP is given in Table 3.2 below:

Table 3.2: Major planning parameters of the final RODP

Planning Parameters

Total Population

25,000

Private Housing Population (no. of flat)

7,530

Subsidised Housing Population (no. of flat)

1,880

Residential Mix (Private : Subsidised Housing)

(based on target population or number of units)

80:20

Average Plot Ratio – Private Housing

4.2

Average Plot Ratio – Subsidised Housing

6.3

3.4                         Key Infrastructure

3.4.1                 In order to support the future development and population inside the Study Area, the following infrastructures will be required:

(1)         Internal roads with associated public transport terminus in the Study Area;

(2)         Access road for main external access via. Po Lam Road;

(3)         Access road for supplementary external access via DAR local road with associated bus bays and semi-enclosure noise barrier;

(4)         Stormwater drainage systems with a retention tank in the Study Area;

(5)         Sewerage systems in the Study Area;

(6)         Water supply systems with salt and fresh water pumping stations and service reservoirs in the Study Area;

(7)         Landscaping works in the Study Area; and

(8)         Viewing platforms.

3.4.2                 In addition, two associated infrastructures will also be implemented under this Project, including:

(1)         Rock cavern development; and

(2)         Road improvement works with associated semi-enclosure noise barrier and Bus-Bus Interchange (BBI) outside the Study Area.

3.4.3                As mentioned in Section 1.4, the above two associated infrastructures are Schedule 2 DPs and their potential environmental impacts will be addressed in other separate EIA studies. Nevertheless, the potential cumulative environmental impacts of these two DPs to the Project have been assessed and included in this EIA.

Consideration of Feasible Alternative Infrastructures Options

3.4.4                The objective of the Investigation Study is to bring forward the RODP proposed under the Planning Study (i.e. the version in March 2013 as mentioned in