Environmental Protection Department Environment Hong Kong 2004
Vision and Mission Foreword Contents Home English Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese
1. Hong Kong's Environment 2. Community Awareness 3. Customer Service and Partnership 4. Environmental Assessment and Planning 5. Air 6. Noise 7. Waste 8. Water 9. Enforcement

 
Resource Materials
 
Chapter 1
  Hong Kong's Environment
 

 

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Our vision is of a Hong Kong which enjoys an environment that is both healthy and pleasant, in which the community places a premium on sustaining such an environment for both themselves and future generations.

 

Our mission is to make our contribution towards realising this vision by applying our professional knowledge and judgment and drawing on our experience in the environmental field
to formulate and implement plans to improve and safeguard the environment;
to increase community awareness of environmental issues;
to implement environmental protection legislation;
to participate in the town planning process;
with a view to achieving and maintaining a high standard of environmental quality.
 

INVESTING IN A CLEANER ENVIRONMENT

The air we breathe, the water we drink and the land we live on are part of our shared environment. For many years, these free natural resources were taken for granted as Hong Kong, like other developed countries, raced ahead in its economic development. Industrial and motor vehicle emissions were spewed into the air, sewage was dumped into the sea and waste was dumped in landfills - all of it with few environmental controls. As the quality of the environment deteriorated, the government saw the need to reduce pollution and prevent future problems. The Environmental Protection Department (EPD) was put in charge of combating pollution and providing the community with a cleaner, healthier environment.

Restoring the environment to cleaner levels requires investment, yet everyone in the community benefits. Since EPD was established in 1986, the government has spent many billions of dollars to provide cleaner air and water and safe waste disposal. Public health and the environment have improved as a result. But our environmental problems are far from over. The continuing development of Hong Kong and its neighbours has increased the pressure on the environment and created new problems. Many more billions of dollars still need to be spent to ensure a healthy environment.

Looking at the EPD's past achievements, there is plenty of evidence of what can be gained by investing in the environment. Beaches are appreciably cleaner today as a result of new sewers and sewage treatment. 23 beaches had good water quality in 2003 as against nine in 1986, and our beach water monitoring programme was well recognised in an October BBC News Report following the issue by the World Health Organisation of a report on safety in recreational waters. Levels of major air pollutants at roadsides have been reduced by some 10 to 20 per cents since 1999 and smoky vehicles are now a rare sight, thanks to a $1.4 billion package to reduce emissions from diesel engines. More than $9 billion was spent in the 1990s replacing outdated waste disposal facilities with new ones that have strict environmental controls.

(Top) A clean and healthy environment for the community.
(Right) Beaches are appreciably cleaner today thanks to the improved sewage treatment.
(Left) A clean and healthy environment for the community.
(Right) Beaches are appreciably cleaner today thanks to the improved sewage treatment.




More people than ever are recycling, including teenagers.
More people than ever are recycling, including teenagers.

Other less costly programmes have also had positive impacts. The EPD's input into planning has helped to protect new developments from excessive traffic noise. Stricter laws on construction work, together with a partnership programme, have resulted in significantly fewer complaints and prosecutions for noise pollution. Partnerships have also been developed with restaurants, vehicle repair workshops and property management companies to reduce a range of pollution problems from these sources. Environmental assessment measures are helping to ensure environmental impacts are addressed before major projects are approved. Community education programmes, especially in the schools, are helping to raise awareness and concern for the environment. Our response to complaints about pollution has also been refined so the public can report problems promptly, and be assured that they are acted on.

These measures have helped to improve many aspects of Hong Kong's environment and developed community understanding and support for the EPD's programmes. But, as anyone can see, the local environment still suffers from smog, water pollution, too much waste and other problems. In 2003, Hong Kong moved closer towards taking significant decisions on how to meet these challenges. In the waste and water programmes in particular, studies on major projects were being completed for public consultation that will ask the community to decide what value it places on a healthy environment.

Our most urgent problem is waste disposal. The current landfills will be full within seven to 11 years, barely enough time to build replacement facilities. Efforts to reduce waste, while significant, will not be enough to buy more time. In recent years, recycling programmes have been introduced across the territory and in a wide range of sectors. More people than ever are recycling and most households now have access to recycling services. Charges have been proposed for construction waste, which accounts for 40 per cent of waste at landfills, and hopefully will gain Legislative Council's approval in 2004. In this respect Hong Kong lags behind most other countries, from Vietnam to Canada, which all impose waste disposal charges. To catch up with the rest of the world, Hong Kong may also need to explore Product Responsibility Schemes in which waste producers have to pay a fair share of recycling and disposal costs. But while recycling and charging can help to reduce waste, they are unfortunately not adequate enough to provide a total solution to our waste problem.

The EPD therefore is investigating waste treatment and disposal options to deal with current and future waste loads. These would involve building facilities to reduce the bulk of waste, extending existing landfills and building new ones. These options are all expensive, yet they must be decided on quickly to prevent waste from piling up on the streets in a few years time. The public will be consulted in 2004 on what it thinks are the best options, both in terms of cost and environmental impact.

Similar decisions are needed to address water quality. The Harbour Area Treatment Scheme has successfully reduced pollution in the central and eastern parts of Victoria Harbour. But that is only the first stage. The next stage would collect sewage from the rest of the harbour and, if the public so desires, increase the level of treatment so all treated effluent could be disposed of safely in the harbour, rather than by deep-sea tunnel in the South China Sea. A higher level of treatment would mean a healthier harbour, but it is several times more expensive than the current treatment being used. The public will be asked to decide in 2004 whether it is willing to pay for a cleaner harbour.

The question of cost also looms over air quality. The government has been able to improve roadside air quality, but regional air quality - the source of smog - is a more complex issue. The Hong Kong and Guangdong governments have agreed on targets to reduce air pollution by 2010 and are working closely together to tackle this problem. Hong Kong needs to continue reducing motor vehicle emissions and to further reduce power plant emissions - a step that will not come cheaply. Proposals are expected in the next few years in which the public, again, will have to make difficult decisions.

For many years, the community has received environmental services free of charge, or at a heavily-subsidised rate. The Chemical Waste Treatment Centre, which was the first environmental service to charge users, recovers only 30 per cent of operating costs. Sewage charges reflect only a fraction of the cost of collection, treatment and disposal. No one currently pays for waste disposal at landfills. The government picked up the bill for these services when its income was high. But in recent years, it has had to cut back on its expenditure and can no longer afford to provide a clean environment without recovering more of the costs or letting others do so, such as private operators. The public needs to realise that if it wants clean water, if it wants its waste taken away and dealt with properly and if it wants clean air, it is going to have to pay for it. A clean environment, once sullied, cannot be restored for free.

Hong Kong Tsing Ma Bridge.
Hong Kong Tsing Ma Bridge.

    THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION DEPARTMENT

The EPD is the main government body responsible for carrying out work to improve the environment and prevent new problems from arising. Until the department was established in 1986, this work had been spread among different departments. The EPD's responsibilities include: proposing policies, enforcing environmental legislation, monitoring environmental quality, providing transfer, treatment and disposal facilities for many types of waste, advising on the environmental implications of town planning and new policies, and handling pollution complaints and incidents.

Enforcement work is carried out by six Local Control Offices, which are also responsible for building partnerships and links throughout the community. Another strand of the EPD's work is building environmental awareness. The Community Relations Unit is in charge of raising awareness and encouraging participation in environmental schemes. The department makes use of its website (http://www.epd.gov.hk) to release a wide range of information to the public, such as the hourly Air Pollution Index and the weekly beach water quality gradings. The department's Environmental Performance Report, which reviews both policies and internal operations, is also posted on the website.

(Left) Mr Rob Law, Director of Environmental Protection, gives a presentation on ''Reflections on 20 Years of Environmental Legislation in Hong Kong'' at the annual dinner of the Hong Kong Environmental Law Association. (Right) EPD's Environmental Performance Report 2003.
(Left) Mr Rob Law, Director of Environmental Protection, gives a presentation on "Reflections on 20 Years of Environmental Legislation in Hong Kong" at the annual dinner of the Hong Kong Environmental Law Association.
(Right) EPD's Environmental Performance Report 2003.
   

  ORGANISATION CHART OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION DEPARTMENT

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Organisation Chart Of Environmental Protection Department
Click to Enlarge

 

    REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION

Working with Our Mainland Counterparts

Hong Kong shares its environment with Guangdong and, since 1990, environment officials from both sides have met regularly to discuss pollution control and initiate joint actions. In 1999 cross-boundary environmental co-operation was strengthened with the establishment of the Joint Working Group on Sustainable Development and Environmental Protection, which was announced simultaneously by Hong Kong's Chief Executive and Guangdong's Governor. One of the first major tasks of the Joint Working Group was to look at regional air quality. In 2002 it established targets to improve regional air quality, and in 2003 it approved an air quality management plan for the Pearl River Delta Region. Preparations were also made to set up a regional air quality monitoring network, which will start operating in 2004.

The EPD also works closely with Environmental Protection Bureaux (EPBs) on the Mainland. In 2003, the Shenzhen EPB and the EPD completed the Joint Study on the Mirs Bay Water Quality Regional Control Strategy and drew up an action plan to protect the clean waters of Mirs Bay, which followed similar co-operation by both sides to protect Deep Bay. For the second year running, officials from the Shanghai EPB and the EPD carried out an exchange programme. The main objectives are to widen the exposure of participating staff, facilitate an exchange of experience, and to foster closer partnership and communication between both jurisdictions. Hong Kong environment and customs officials also co-operated with their Mainland counterparts during the year to combat illegal transboundary shipments of hazardous electronic waste.

Cross-boundary co-operation has also been further developed with national environmental bodies on the Mainland. In 2003 we expanded our work with the State Environmental Protection Administration to focus on the area of environmental impact assessments. China introduced a new law on EIAs in 2003 and Hong Kong has comparatively more experience in this area. We therefore will conduct more exchanges and information-sharing sessions on EIA experiences, practices and knowledge with our Mainland counterparts.

(Left) The Secretary for Civil Service, Mr Joseph Wong (centre), meets exchange officers from the Shanghai Municipal Government. 
(Right) EPD colleagues welcome Mr Zheng Yi-Xiong (centre right) from the Shanghai EPB.
(Left) The Secretary for Civil Service, Mr Joseph Wong (centre), meets exchange officers from the Shanghai Municipal Government.
(Right) EPD colleagues welcome Mr Zheng Yi-Xiong (centre right) from the Shanghai EPB.

 

Mr David Anderson, the Canadian Minister of Environment, and Dr Sarah Liao, Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works, renewing the MOU in Hong Kong
Mr David Anderson, the Canadian Minister of Environment, and Dr Sarah Liao, Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works, renewing the MOU in Hong Kong.

Collaboration with Canada

Canada and Hong Kong first signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Environmental Collaboration in 1992 and this was renewed in 2003. The Canadian Minister of Environment, Mr David Anderson, visited in September, meeting Hong Kong's Chief Executive and the Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works, as well as other officials and community representatives. A number of activities were organised alongside the visit, including an experience-sharing workshop on managing regional air quality which was attended by representatives from Hong Kong, Macau, Canada and the Mainland

A workshop was held on stormwater management which was attended by environment officials from Canada, Hong Kong and Australia. Another workshop on climate change was organised at the end of the year by the EPD, Environment Canada and the California Air Resources Board, which was also attended by the State Environmental Protection Administration.


 

Strategic Environmental Assessment Workshop held in Thailand, 2003.
Strategic Environmental Assessment Workshop held in Thailand, 2003.

Participating in International Events

The EPD regularly monitors international developments in environmental protection. We also organise and participate in international workshops, seminars and conferences, so as to gain a better understanding of different experiences and solutions in controlling pollution and improving the environment.

In 2003, EPD EIA officials also played an active and leading role internationally in the field of environmental impact assessment. The Assistant Director of Environmental Protection, Mr Elvis Au, who is also the former President of the International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA), played a leading role in a project on the development of a distance learning programme on Strategic Environmental Assessment for Mainland China, jointly initiated by the World Bank and the IAIA and with the involvement of more than 20 international experts and over 10 experts in Mainland China. Mr Au was also invited by the Thai Government in November 2003 to be the international resource person for an international Strategic Environmental Assessment workshop in Thailand.

In 2003 the EPD co-organised an international seminar on noise barriers with the Highways Department, Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Hong Kong Institute of Acoustics. The design and function of noise barriers was the focus of talks by speakers from Australia, Belgium, Britain and Japan, as well as Hong Kong.

EPD officials have also been active over the years in attending and organising international meetings on waste management.


EPD Plays an Active Role in ISWA Activities

The International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) is the most representative international body on waste management with 35 national members from major western countries (the United States, Canada, France, Britain, Germany, Italy, Australia, New Zealand, etc) and Asian countries (Japan, South Korea, Singapore), as well as China.

The EPD is a member of ISWA and has organised two major ISWA conferences in Hong Kong, the Chemical Waste Management Conference in October 1992 and the International Waste Management Conference: The Challenge for Asian Cities - Search for a Sustainable Future in 2000. The EPD has also established a good relationship with the China Association of Urban Environmental Sanitation (CAUES), which represents China on ISWA. The President of CAUES led a delegation to the international conference in Hong Kong in 2000, while the Deputy Director of Environmental Protection, Mr Mike Stokoe, led delegations to two solid waste management conferences organised by CAUES in Guangzhou in 2001 and in Beijing in 2002.

(Left)Proceedings of the Chemical Waste Management Conference in 1992 and the Year 2000's International Waste Management Conference held in Hong Kong.
(Right)Mr Mike Stokoe, Deputy Director of EPD (back row second from left), together with other chairmen of the ISWA working groups.
(Left) Proceedings of the Chemical Waste Management Conference in 1992 and the Year 2000's International Waste Management Conference held in Hong Kong.
(Right) Mr Mike Stokoe, Deputy Director of EPD (back row second from left), together with other chairmen of the ISWA working groups.

In recognition of the contributions made by Mr Stokoe, who has been a member of ISWA for more than 10 years, CAUES agreed with ISWA that he should chair the ISWA Working Group on Hazardous Waste. Through the efforts of the working group and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), a training manual for developing countries was published as a joint ISWA/UNEP publication. The manual was formally launched at the ISWA Annual Congress in July 2002 and Mr Fritz Balkau of UNEP (in conjunction with Mr David Wilson) received a Publication Award at the ISWA Annual Congress in Melbourne in November 2003.

The training manual was tested at a training course held in Istanbul in July 2002 and Mr Keith Yeung of the EPD was one of the trainers. Mr Yeung also participated in the preparation of the Chinese version of the training manual in co-operation with the Hong Kong Waste Management Association (HKWMA) and CAUES.

Mr Patrick Lei of the EPD is a member of the ISWA Working Group on Healthcare Waste. He joined other working group members to participate in a training workshop on healthcare waste for developing countries which was held in Istanbul in July 2002.

(Left) Mr Patrick Lei, Principal Environmental Protection Officer, EPD, presents Hong Kong's experience in dealing with clinical waste at the conference held in Melbourne, November 2003.
(Right) Mr Jeff Cooper represents ISWA in presenting the Publication Award to Mr Fritz Balkau of UNEP for his efforts in preparing the Training Manual on Hazardous Waste.
(Left) Mr Patrick Lei, Principal Environmental Protection Officer, EPD, presents Hong Kong's experience in dealing with clinical waste at the conference held in Melbourne, November 2003.
(Right) Mr Jeff Cooper represents ISWA in presenting the Publication Award to Mr Fritz Balkau of UNEP for his efforts in preparing the Training Manual on Hazardous Waste.

 
Mr C F Lam of EPD, the current chairman of the Hong Kong Waste Management Association (HKWMA), leads a delegation to attend the Second International Symposium and Exhibition on Solid Waste Treatment organised by CAUES in Beijing in November 2003.
Mr C F Lam of EPD, the current chairman of the Hong Kong Waste Management Association (HKWMA), leads a delegation to attend the Second International Symposium and Exhibition on Solid Waste Treatment organised by CAUES in Beijing in November 2003.

In recognition of his expertise on the subject, Mr Lei was also invited as a speaker to the National Clinical Waste Conference held in Melbourne in November 2003. He spoke about Hong Kong's proposed clinical waste control scheme, as well as medical waste management in China. Dr David Ha of the EPD also joined the conference and spoke about Hong Kong's experience in dealing with waste arisings from the Avian Flu and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) incidents.

 

   

    EPD'S INPUT IN THE FIGHT AGAINST SARS
 

EPD staff investigates, by means of a smoke test, the soil stack as a possible pathway for SARS virus at Amoy Gardens.
EPD staff investigates, by means of a smoke test, the soil stack as a possible pathway for SARS virus at Amoy Gardens.

The appearance of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus in the spring of 2003 affected all corners of life in Hong Kong, including the EPD. The department was asked in late March to put together a multi-disciplinary team to assist the Department of Health with investigations into the SARS outbreak at Amoy Gardens. It was unclear at that stage how the virus spread, but several staff together with academics from the City University of Hong Kong and the Hong Kong Polytechnic University volunteered for the job despite the risk. After a number of experiments, they were able to show how virus-contaminated aerosols might have been sucked out of the soil stack into the bathrooms and blown into a light well, where they were carried to other flats. This was an important finding in helping to understand the spread of SARS that was subsequently verified and endorsed by experts from the World Health Organization.

Some of our on-going work was affected by the outbreak. The World Environment Day programme had to be re-organised as an outdoor event, where people felt less vulnerable to the virus, with the result that more than 100 000 people joined walks around Hong Kong. Complaints about water pollution and waste increased as more people became concerned about hygiene and the spread of SARS. Water quality was monitored to see if the heavy use of bleach had raised chlorine in local waters to unsafe levels. Fortunately, this was not the case.

   

   

Milestones in Environmental Protection Starting 1986

EPD'S INPUT IN THE FIGHT AGAINST SARS

1986
Established the Environmental Protection Department on 1st April, bringing the majority of pollution prevention and control activities under one umbrella.

Enacted Water Pollution Control Regulations under the Water Pollution Control Ordinance (1980).

1987
Declared the first water control zone (WCZ) at Tolo Harbour.

Commenced the Sewerage Master Plan (SMP) programme to provide a blue print for the sewerage infrastructure required to collect sewage on a catchment-basis.

1988
Implemented the Livestock Waste Control Scheme.

Enacted Noise Control Ordinance to provide statutory powers for the control of noise from domestic and public places, construction sites, industrial and commercial premises and noisy products.

1989
Published the White Paper on "Pollution: A Time to Act" laying down a comprehensive 10-year plan to fight pollution.

Published the statutory Waste Disposal Plan under the Waste Disposal Ordinance to set out a 10-year plan for developing new facilities and closing old ones.

1990
Commissioned Hong Kong's first Refuse Transfer Station (RTS) at Kowloon Bay.

Implemented the Air Pollution Control (Fuel Restriction) Regulations to limit the sulphur content and viscosity of fuel oils. Significant improvement was seen in ambient sulphur dioxide.

1991
Established the first two Local Control Offices (LCOs) to improve pollution control, services and liaison with the community.

Introduced unleaded petrol on 1st April to reduce harmful lead pollution.

   

 
EPD'S INPUT IN THE FIGHT AGAINST SARS

1992
Completed Hong Kong's first "over-road" noise barrier at Tate's Cairn Tunnel approach roads to protect adjacent high rise dwellings from road traffic noise.

Saw announcement in Governor's Address to the Legislative Council that all Executive Council policy and project papers contain an Environmental Implications paragraph.

1993
Commissioned comprehensive Chemical Waste Treatment Centre - the first in South East Asia, with a capacity to treat 100 000 tonnes of chemical waste per annum, most of which had previously been dumped in the harbour.

Commissioned West New Territories (WENT) Landfill, the first of three strategic landfills in Hong Kong.

1994
Opened the EPD's Visitors Centre in Revenue Tower, Wan Chai to complement the Wan Chai Environmental Resource Centre. These are the gateways to environmental information for the community.

Banned the import of halons and introduced controls on 3,4-hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC), 3,4 hydrobromo-fluorocarbons (HBFC), and methyl bromide under the Ozone Layer Protection Ordinance, fulfilled our global obligation in environmental protection.

1995
Launched Hong Kong's first Air Pollution Index (API) to inform the community of the status of air pollution in Hong Kong.

Extended the 24-hour pollution complaint hotline service to six local hotlines to handle complaints on a district basis.

1996
Enacted the Air Pollution Control (Open Burning) Regulation to put open burning activities under control.

Established EPD's home page in the World Wide Web to provide the public with easy access to environmental information conducive to an informed and environmentally aware community.

1997
Enacted the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance to set out the framework for controlling environmental impacts of major development projects.

Launched the liquefied petroleum gas taxis pilot scheme to reduce air pollution.

 

 
EPD'S INPUT IN THE FIGHT AGAINST SARS

1998
Saw announcement by the Chief Executive's Policy Address that all policy secretaries and directors of bureaux and departments have to provide environmental reports for their organisations starting in 2000.

Saw agreement by the Hong Kong - Guangdong Environmental Protection Liaison Group to work towards removing all effluent from the Deep Bay catchment as a long term goal.

1999
Placed emphasis in the Chief Executive's Policy Address on "Quality People, Quality Home" and sustainable development.

Announced a comprehensive programme of measures to tackle motor vehicle emissions.

2000
Saw endorsement by the Executive Council of a new policy to redress noise impacts from existing roads by means of engineering and non-engineering measures where practicable.

Saw signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the State Environmental Protection Administration and the Environmental Protection Department on hazardous waste import and export control.

2001
Tightened motor vehicle fuel requirements, and introduced Euro III emission standards for newly registered vehicles, in step with the European Union, and requiring newly-registered taxis to be fuelled by LPG or petrol.

Saw full commissioning of Stage 1 of the Harbour Area Treatment Scheme (HATS) [formerly known as Strategic Sewage Disposal Scheme (SSDS)].

2002
Completed a report on air quality in the Pearl River Delta region, through the Joint Working Group on Sustainable Development and Environmental Protection.

Launched the Waste Recycling Campaign in Housing Estates (Phase VI), with the participation of 1 200 public and private housing estates covering some 1.5 million households, and co-operation with community groups to launch waste recovery schemes.

 

 
2003

January
Distributed 2003 desktop calendars, which includes educational material, to owners, operators and managers of the restaurant trade and their major stakeholders.

Began consultation on the Codes of Practice to prevent violations of the Noise Control Ordinance, with emphasis on good management practices.

Launched a trial recovery programme for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) and computers, which resulted in 25 000 units of WEEE, computers and computer peripherals being recovered for reuse or recycling over 12 months.


February
Launched the Environmental Essays Competition, on the theme "Safeguarding Our Heritage: A Clean Victoria Harbour", jointly organised with the Lions Club and the Association of English Medium Secondary Schools.


March
Completed the Green Leader Programme, which trained 10 000 stakeholders as green leaders.

Launched the Green Property Website for the Environmental Property Management Programme.

Completed the Mirs Bay Water Quality Regional Control Strategy Joint Study and formulated a regional water quality management strategy for Mirs Bay, in collaboration with Shenzhen authorities.


April
Implemented the Waste Recycling Campaign in Housing Estates (Phase VII), with the participation of 1 333 housing estates.

Launched the "Green Construction Example" and "Green Construction Equipment" website, supported by the Business and Services Promotion Unit (BSPU).

Launched a pilot programme to recycle waste tyres, recycling about 230 tonnes per month for the production of a lightweight geo-construction material to be used as filling material for road sub-base and slopes.

May
Participated in the Team Clean operation and undertook joint efforts with other government departments to improve environmental hygiene in the community, with particular emphasis on flytipping of waste, broken pipes and discharges in backlanes, illegal connections to stormwater drains and improperly maintained septic tanks.

Held an environmental workshop on "Planning & Supervision Towards a Green Construction", jointly organised with the Hong Kong Construction Association.

Saw the extension of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and its Kyoto Protocol to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region by the Central People's Government.


June
Launched the Native Tree Planting Competition to promote waste reduction by organic composting and care for native trees.

Organised World Environment Day 2003 celebrations on the theme, "Walking for a Green and Healthy Hong Kong". About 100 000 people participated.

Extended the scope of the one-stop "Restaurant Help Desk Service" to cover dedicated modular training for the restaurant trade, a meet-the-adviser service and the development of standards and criteria for green restaurants.

Prepared an interim version of the EPD's Strategic Environmental Assessment Manual (SEA) with a view to promoting the importance of SEA in the region.

Completed a study on the development of a biological indicator system for monitoring marine pollution in Hong Kong.


July
Launched The First Hong Kong Green Pre-school Award, aimed at promoting environmental management in schools, with more than 110 pre-schools participating.

Received the Special Achievement in GIS Awards at the 23rd Annual ESRI International User Conference held in July 2003 in San Diego, USA, for our GIS-based Pollution Complaint Management database.


August
Organised the "Organic Farms in the City" competition for primary and secondary school students, to promote organic farming and farm design from waste materials.

Opened the Fanling Environmental Resource Centre.


September
Jointly launched the Jiminy Cricket's Environmentality Challenge with Hong Kong Disneyland.

Collaborated with the Hong Kong Polytechnic University to organise a short course, the "Certificate of Environmental Protection in Construction Industry".

Launched a trial "Mooncake Containers Recovery Programme" with support from the trade associations, property management companies, Radio Hong Kong One and the Agency for Volunteer Service, over the two weekends following the Mid-Autumn festival. About 25 000 containers were collected.

Published "The Statement of Prosecution Policy for the Environmental Protection Department". The purpose is to ensure fair and consistent decision-making amongst the departmental prosecutors responsible for environmental prosecutions, and to make the process more understandable and transparent to the public.

Commenced the Indoor Air Quality Certification Scheme for Offices and Public Places.

October
Launched slogan and logo design competitions for students and the general public to encourage the use of rechargeable batteries.

Held an environmental workshop on "Green Construction Practices - Everybody's Responsibility" jointly organised with the Hong Kong Construction Association.

Launched a six-month "Water Saving Project" with the Chinese Cuisine Training Institute, with the aim of helping the restaurant trade save water.

Commenced a study on Environmental Impact Assessment and Landuse Rezoning for Development of Recovery Park in Tuen Mun Area 38.

Launched the Environmental Protection Interactive Centre (EPIC) on the EPD website, to give the public access to more specific information.


November
Organised the "Hong Kong Environmental Protection Festival 2003 - Forum on SMEs in Environmental Protection Industry" to promote the waste recovery and recycling industries.

Launched a territory-wide "Wait Green, Engine Off" Campaign covering 18 districts.

Issued guidelines on "What Property Managers can Consider in Dealing with Noise from Renovation Work".


December
Launched the "Green School Website" to provide support to schools on environmental management in schools.

Celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Wan Chai Environmental Resource Centre.

Hosted the Environmental Property Management Programme - 2003 Experience Sharing Forum.

Published the "Environmental Guidebook for Vehicle Repair Trade" (together with a VCD), to promote the vehicle repair workshop partnership scheme to trade associations and assist operators in complying with the legislative requirements.

Saw endorsement of the Regional Air Quality Management Plan for the Pearl River Delta Region by the Hong Kong-Guangdong Joint Working Group on Sustainable Development and Environment Protection.

Introduced mandatory requirement that pre-Euro diesel vehicles not more than four tonnes be retrofitted with emission reduction devices.

Implemented 14-day Fast-track Processing of Construction Noise Permit Applications.

 

 

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