Contents

 

                                                                                                                                                       

               Chapter 10          Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment 1

10.1         Introduction  1

10.2         Environmental Legislation, Standards and Guidelines  2

10.3         Assessment Methodology  3

10.4         Scope and Content of the Study  8

10.5         Review of Planning and Development Control Framework  10

10.6         Baseline Study  11

10.7         Landscape Impact Assessment 32

10.8         Visual Impact Assessment 40

10.9         Landscape and Visual Mitigation Measures  47

10.10       Residual Impacts  60

10.11       Conclusion  67

 

               Figures

               Figure 10.1101    Landscape and Visual Impact Study Area

               Figure 10.1102    Aerial Photos

               Figure 10.1103    Review of Planning and Development Framework Plan

               Figure 10.1201    Baseline Landscape Resources

               Figure 10.1202    Baseline Landscape Resources Photos (Sheet 1 of 3)

               Figure 10.1203    Baseline Landscape Resources Photos (Sheet 2 of 3)

               Figure 10.1204    Baseline Landscape Resources Photos (Sheet 3 of 3)

               Figure 10.1301    Baseline Landscape Character Areas

               Figure 10.1302    Baseline Landscape Character Areas Photos (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1303    Baseline Landscape Character Areas Photos (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1401    Baseline Key VSRs and Viewpoints at Local Level with Development Proposal Overlaid During Construction

               Figure 10.1401a  Baseline Key VSRs and Viewpoints at Local Level with Development Proposal Overlaid During Construction

               Figure 10.1402    Baseline Key VSRs Photo at Local Level (Sheet 1 of 6)

               Figure 10.1403    Baseline Key VSRs Photo at Local Level (Sheet 2 of 6)

               Figure 10.1404    Baseline Key VSRs Photo at Local Level (Sheet 3 of 6)

               Figure 10.1405    Baseline Key VSRs Photo at Local Level (Sheet 4 of 6)

               Figure 10.1406    Baseline Key VSRs Photo at Local Level (Sheet 5 of 6)

               Figure 10.1407    Baseline Key VSRs Photo at Local Level (Sheet 6 of 6)

               Figure 10.1601    Residual Impacts on Landscape Resources with Mitigation Measures in Year 10

               Figure 10.1611    Residual Impacts on Landscape Character Areas with Mitigation Measures in Year 10

               Figure 10.1621    Residual Impacts on VSRs at Local Level with Mitigation Measures in Year 10

               Figure 10.1621a   Residual Impacts on VSRs at Local Level with Mitigation Measures in Year 10

               Figure 10.1701    Key Plan of Photomontage and Model Viewpoints

               Figure 10.1701a   Key Plan of Photomontage and Model Viewpoints

               Figure 10.1702    Viewpoint No.1 Photomontage from REC1 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1703    Viewpoint No.1 Photomontage from REC1 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1704    Viewpoint No.2 Photomontage from REC3 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1705    Viewpoint No.2 Photomontage from REC3 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1706    Viewpoint No.3 Photomontage from REC4 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1707    Viewpoint No.3 Photomontage from REC4 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1708    Viewpoint No.4 Photomontage from REC7 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1709    Viewpoint No.4 Photomontage from REC7 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1710    Viewpoint No.5 Photomontage from REC9 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1711    Viewpoint No.5 Photomontage from REC9 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1712    Viewpoint No.6 Photomontage from REC2 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1713    Viewpoint No.6 Photomontage from REC2 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1714    Viewpoint No.7 Photomontage from REC5 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1715    Viewpoint No.7 Photomontage from REC5 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1716    Viewpoint No.8 Photomontage from REC6 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1717    Viewpoint No.8 Photomontage from REC6 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1718    Viewpoint No.9 Photomontage from REC8 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1719    Viewpoint No.9 Photomontage from REC8 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1720    Viewpoint No.10 Photomontage from REC10 Existing and without Mitigation Measures (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1721    Viewpoint No.10 Photomontage from REC10 Day 1 and Year 10 with Mitigation Measures (Sheet 2 of 2)

               Figure 10.1801    Master Landscape Plan (Sheet 1 of 6)

               Figure 10.1802    Master Landscape Plan (Sheet 2 of 6)

               Figure 10.1803    Master Landscape Plan (Sheet 3 of 6)

               Figure 10.1804    Master Landscape Plan (Sheet 4 of 6)

               Figure 10.1805    Master Landscape Plan (Sheet 5 of 6)

               Figure 10.1806    Master Landscape Plan (Sheet 6 of 6)

               Figure 10.1807    Landscape Section (Sheet 1 of 2)

               Figure 10.1808    Landscape Section (Sheet 2 of 2)

 

             Appendix

             Appendix 10.1    Tree Survey Information

             Appendix 10.2    Drainage and Sewerage Layout Plan

 

 

 


10                          Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment

10.1                   Introduction

10.1.1         This section assesses the potential landscape and visual impacts arising from the proposed Elevated Pedestrian Corridor in Yuen Long Town connecting with Long Ping Station (the Project”). The Project is to construct an elevated pedestrian corridor above Yuen Long Town Nullah from West Rail Long Ping Station (WRLPS) crossing over Yuen Long On Ning Road (YLONR), Castle Peak Road – Yuen Long Section (CPRYLS) to the south of Kau Yuk Road (KYR) with provision for future extension to Yuen Long South areas.

10.1.2         Landscape and visual impacts of any above ground structures and work areas associated with the project during both construction and operation stages within the study area will be assessed. Key elements of the proposed works are described in Chapter 1 and 2.

10.1.3         The assessment includes:

·      a definition of the scope and contents of the study, including a description of the assessment methodology;

·      a review of the relevant planning and development control framework;

·      a review of comments received during earlier public consultations and how these comments have been addressed in the design;

·      a baseline study providing a comprehensive and accurate description of the baseline landscape resources, landscape character areas and visual sensitive receivers (VSRs);

·      identification of the potential landscape and visual impacts and prediction of their magnitude and potential significance, before and after the mitigation measures;

·      recommendation of appropriate mitigation measures and associated implementation programmes; and

·      an assessment of the acceptability or otherwise of the predicted residual impacts, according to the five criteria set out in Annex 10 of the EIAO-TM.

10.1.4         The landscape and visual impact assessment follows the criteria and guidelines as stated in Annexes 10 and 18 of the EIAO TM. Colour photographs showing baseline conditions, and photomontages and illustrative materials supporting conclusions are provided and the locations of all key viewpoints shall be clearly mapped. Photomontages at representative locations provide comparison between existing views, proposals on day 1 after completion without mitigation measures, on day 1 after completion with mitigation measures, and in year 10 after completion with mitigation measures in accordance with EIAO Guidance Note No. 8/2010.

10.2                   Environmental Legislation, Standards and Guidelines

10.2.1         The methodology for undertaking the landscape and visual impact assessment is in accordance with Annex 10 and 18 of the Technical Memorandum on Environment Impact Assessment Process, the EIAO Guidance Note No. 8/2010 and the EIA Study Brief No. ESB-278/2014.  Legislation, standards and guidelines applicable to this assessment are as follows:

·      EIAO Guidance Note 8/2010 (Preparation of Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment under the EIAO);

·      Town Planning Ordinance (Cap131) and Town Planning (Amendment)  Ordinance;

·      Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance (Cap.499.S.16) and the Technical Memorandum on EIA Process (EIAO TM), particularly Annexes 10 and 18,

·      Hong Kong Planning Standards and Guidelines Chapter 4 and Chapter 11, and

·      Urban Design Guidelines for Hong Kong issued by the PlanD (2003);

·      Study on Landscape Value Mapping of Hong Kong.

·      Land Administration Office Instruction (LAOI) Section D-12 - Tree Preservation,

·      DEVB TCW No. 07/2015 - Tree Preservation;

·      DEVB TC(W) No. 2/2012 - Allocation of Space for Quality Greening on Roads;

·      DEVB TC(W) No. 3/2012 - Site Coverage of Greenery for Government Building Projects;

·      ETWB TCW No. 06/2015 - Maintenance of Vegetation and Hard Landscape Features;

·      GEO 1/2011 - Technical Guidelines on Landscaping Treatment for Slopes. Tree Survey Methodology

·      DEVB TC(W) No. 2/2013 – Greening on Footbridges and Flyovers

·      ETWB TCW No. 11/2004 - Cyber Manual for Greening;

·      ETWB TCW No. 29/2004 - Registration of Old and Valuable Trees, and Guidelines for their Preservation;

·      ETWB No. 36/ 2004 - Advisory Committee on the Appearance of Bridges and Associated Structures (ACABAS),

·      PNAP APP-152 Sustainable Building Guidelines;

·      CEDD TC No. 06/2014 - Vetting Committee on Slope Appearance;

·      Cyber Manual for Greening (GLTM of DEVB);

·      ETWB TCW No. 13/2003A - Guidelines and Procedures for Environmental Impact Assessment of Government Projects and Proposals Planning for Provision of Noise Barriers,

·      Guidelines on Tree Transplanting (9/2014), GLTM of DEVB

·      Guidelines on Tree Preservation during Development (4/2015), GLTM of DEVB

·      Green Infrastructure, GLTM of DEVB  - Website:

http://www.greening.gov.hk/en/new_trend/green_infrastructure.html 

·      Measures on Tree Preservation, GLTM of DEVB  - Website:

http://www.greening.gov.hk/en/management/tree_m_and_m.html#tree_maintenance

10.3                   Assessment Methodology

10.3.1         Landscape and visual impacts have been assessed separately for the construction and operation phases.

10.3.2         The assessment of landscape impacts has involved the following procedures:

·      Identification of the baseline landscape resources and landscape character areas found within the study area. This is achieved by site visit and desktop study of topographical maps, information databases and photographs.

·      Assessment of the degree of sensitivity of the landscape resources and landscape character areas and the classification (rating) of sensitivity and each landscape resources and landscape character area. This is influenced by a number of factors including:

-         quality and maturity of landscape resources/characters;

-         importance and rarity of special landscape elements;

-         whether the landscape resources are considered to be of local, regional, national or global importance;

-         whether there are any statutory or regulatory limitations/requirements relating to the landscape resources/characters; and

-         ability of the landscape resources/characters to accommodate change.

10.3.3         The sensitivity of each landscape resource and character area is classified as follows:

High:            Important landscape or landscape resource of particularly distinctive character or high importance, sensitive to relatively small changes.

Medium:      Landscape or landscape resource of moderately valued landscape characteristics reasonably tolerant to change.

Low:            Landscape or landscape resource of low valued landscape characteristics highly tolerant to change.

·      Identification of potential sources of landscape impacts during construction and operation phases. These are the various elements of the construction works and operation procedures that would generate landscape impacts.

·      Identification of the magnitude of change and the classification (rating) of the magnitude of change for all landscape resources and landscape character areas. The magnitude of the impact (or magnitude of change) depends on a number of factors including:

-         scale of development;

-         compatibility of the project with the surrounding landscape;

-         duration of impacts, i.e. whether it is temporary (short, medium or long term), under construction and operation phases; and

-         reversibility of change.

10.3.4         The magnitude of landscape impacts is classified as follows:

Large:              The landscape or landscape resource would suffer major change. (beneficial or adverse)

Intermediate:   The landscape or landscape resource would suffer moderate change. (beneficial or adverse)

Small:               The landscape or landscape resource would suffer slight or barely perceptible change. (beneficial or adverse)

Negligible:        The landscape or landscape resources would suffer no discernible change.

Nil:                   The landscape or landscape resources would suffer no change.

·      Significant threshold of potential landscape impact (before mitigation) during construction and operation.  By synthesising the magnitude of the various impacts and the sensitivity of the various landscape resources it is possible to categorise impacts in a logical, well-reasoned and consistent fashion. Table 10.1 shows the rationale for dividing the degree of significance into four thresholds, namely insubstantial, slight, moderate, and substantial, depending on the combination of a negligible-small-intermediate-large magnitude of impact and a low-medium-high degree of sensitivity of landscape resource/character.

 

Table 10.1  Relationship between Receptor Sensitivity and Impact Magnitude in Defining Impact Significance

Magnitude of Impact (Both beneficial and adverse impact are assessed)

Large

Moderate

Moderate / Substantial

Substantial

Intermediate

Slight / Moderate

Moderate

Moderate / Substantial

Small

Slight

Slight / Moderate

Moderate

Negligible

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

 

Low

Medium

High

 

Receptor Sensitivity (of Landscape Resource, Landscape Character Area or VSR)

 

·      Identification of potential landscape mitigation measures. Mitigation measures may take the form of

-         adopting alternative design or revisions to the basic engineering or architectural design to prevent and/or minimize adverse impacts;

-         remedial measures such as colour and textural treatment of physical, engineering and building features; and

-         compensatory measures such as the implementation of landscape design measures (e.g. tree planting, creation of new open space etc) to compensate for unavoidable adverse impacts and to attempt to generate potentially beneficial long term impacts.

10.3.5         The significance of landscape impacts is categorised as follows:

Substantial:

Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause significant deterioration or improvement in existing landscape quality.

Moderate:

Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause noticeable deterioration or improvement in existing landscape quality.

Slight:

Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause barely perceptible deterioration or improvement in existing landscape quality.

Insubstantial:

No discernible change in the existing landscape quality.

Nil:

No impact on the existing landscape quality.

10.3.6         A programme for the mitigation measures is provided and discussed in Section 10.9. The agencies responsible for the funding, implementation, management and maintenance of the mitigation measures are proposed in Table 10.6 and 10.7.

·      Significant threshold of residual impact after the implementation of the mitigation measures during Construction and Operation: Day 1 and Year 10.  The level of residual impact is derived from the magnitude of change which the proposed works will cause to the existing landscape resources or landscape character areas and the ability of the LRs and LCAs to tolerate change, i.e. the quality and sensitivity of the LRs and LCAs, taking into account the beneficial effects of the proposed mitigation measures. The significance threshold is derived from the matrix shown in Table 10.1.

·      Prediction of Acceptability of Impacts.  An overall assessment of the acceptability, or otherwise, of the impacts according to the five criteria set out in Annex 10 of the EIAO TM as below:

Beneficial

The proposed works will complement the landscape and visual character of its setting, follow the relevant planning objectives, and improve overall and visual quality.

 

Acceptable

There will be no significant effects on the landscape, no significant visual effects, and no interference with the key views due to the proposed works.

 

Acceptable with Mitigation Measures

There will be some adverse effects due to the proposed works, but the adverse effects can be eliminated, reduced or offset to a large extent by the proposed mitigation measures.

 

Unacceptable

There will be the adverse effects that are considered too excessive and are unable to mitigate practically.

 

Undetermined

Significant adverse effects are likely, but the extent to which they may occur or may be mitigated cannot be determined from the

study. Further detailed study will be required for the specific effects in question.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.3.7         The assessment of visual impacts has involved the following:

·      Identification of Zones of Visual Influence (ZVIs) during the construction and operation phase of the project. This is achieved by site visit and desktop study of topographic maps and photographs, and preparation of cross-section to determine the visibility of the project from various locations.

·      Identification of Visual Sensitive Receivers (VSRs) within the Zone of Visual Influence (ZVIs) at construction and operation phases. These are the people who would reside within, work within, play within, or travel through, the ZVIs.

·      Assessment of the degree of Sensitivity of the VSRs. Factors considered include:

-         the type of VSRs, which is classified according to whether the person is at home, at work, at school, at play, or travelling. Those who view the impact from their homes are considered to be highly sensitive as the attractiveness or otherwise of the outlook from their home will have a substantial effect on their perception of the quality and acceptability of their home environment and their general quality of life. Those who view the impact from their workplace and at school are considered to be only moderately sensitive as the attractiveness or otherwise of the outlook will have a less important, although still material, effect on their perception of their quality of life. The degree to which this applies depends on whether the workplace is industrial, retail or commercial. Those who view the impact whilst taking part in an outdoor leisure activity may display varying sensitivity depending on the type of leisure activity. Those who view the impact whilst travelling on a public thoroughfare will also display varying sensitivity depending on the speed of travel.

-         other factors which are considered (as required by EIAO GN 8/2010) include the number of individuals, value and quality of existing views, the availability and amenity of alternative views, the duration or frequency of view, and the degree of visibility.

10.3.8         The sensitivity of VSRs is classified as follows:

High:                The VSRs are highly sensitive to any change in their viewing experience.

Medium:          The VSRs are moderately sensitive to any change in their viewing experience.

Low:                 The VSRs are only slightly sensitive to any change in their viewing experience.

·      Identification of relative numbers of VSRs. This is expressed in term of whether there are few, medium or many VSRs in any one category of VSR.

·      Identification of potential sources of visual impacts. These are the various elements of the construction works and operation procedures that would generate visual impacts.

·      Assessment of the potential magnitude of visual impacts. Factors considered include

-         the compatibility with the surrounding landscape;

-         the duration of the impact;

-         the reversibility of the impact;

-         the scale of the impact and distance of the source of impact from the viewer; and

-         potential blockage of view.

10.3.9         The magnitude of visual impacts is classified as follows:

Large:              The VSRs would suffer major change in their viewing experience.

Intermediate:   The VSRs would suffer moderate change in their viewing experience.

Small:               The VSRs would suffer small change in their viewing experience.

Negligible:        The VSRs would suffer no discernible change in their viewing experience.

·      Identification of potential visual mitigation measures. These may take the form of adopting alternative designs or revisions to the basic engineering and architectural design to prevent and/or minimise adverse impacts, remedial measures such as colour and textural treatment of building features, landscape and visual enhancement and tree planting to screen the roads and associated bridge structures. A programme for the mitigation measures is provided and discussed in Section 7. The agencies responsible for the funding, implementation, maintenance of the mitigation measures are identified and their approval-in-principle has been sought.

·      Prediction of the significance of visual impacts before and after the implementation of the mitigation measures. By synthesising the magnitude of the various visual impacts and the sensitivity of the VSRs, and the numbers of VSRs that are affected, it is possible to categorise the degree of significance of the impacts in a logical, well-reasoned and consistent fashion. Table 10.1 shows the rationale for dividing the degree of significance into four thresholds, namely, insubstantial, slight, moderate and substantial, depending on the combination of a negligible-small-intermediate-large magnitude of impact and a low-medium-high degree of sensitivity of VSRs.

10.3.10       The significance of visual impacts is categorised as follows:

Substantial:     Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause significant deterioration or improvement in existing visual quality.

Moderate:        Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause noticeable deterioration or improvement in existing visual quality.

Slight:               Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause barely perceptible deterioration or improvement in existing visual quality.

Insubstantial:  No discernible change in the existing visual quality.

·      Prediction of Acceptability of Impacts. An overall assessment of the acceptability, or otherwise, of the impacts according to the five criteria set out in Annex 10 of the EIAO TM as below.

Substantial:

Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause significant deterioration or improvement in existing visual quality.

Moderate:

Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause noticeable deterioration or improvement in existing visual quality.

Slight:

Adverse / beneficial impact where the proposal would cause barely perceptible deterioration or improvement in existing visual quality.

Insubstantial:

No discernible change in the existing visual quality.

10.3.11       It is assumed that funding, implementation and maintenance agency of the mitigation measures can be satisfactorily resolved according to the principles in DEVB TCW No.  7/2015. All mitigation measures in this report are practical and achievable within the known parameters of funding, implementation and maintenance agency. The suggested agencies for the funding and implementation (and subsequent maintenance, if applicable) are indicated in Table 10.6 -10.7. Approval-in-principle to the implementation and maintenance of the proposed mitigation measures is being sought from the appropriate authorities.

10.4                   Scope and Content of the Study

10.4.1.1      The study area for the landscape impact assessment will include all areas within 100m from the works limit as indicated in Drawing no. 10.1101, and the context of the Project is shown on drawing 10.1102.

10.4.1.2      The area for the visual impact assessment shall be defined by the visual envelope of the Project and associated works during the construction and operation phases. The defined visual envelope is illustrated in drawing no. 10.1401.

10.4.1.3      Detail project background and project description are provided in Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 of the report, while construction method, implementation programme, and concurrent projects are provided in section 2.6, 2.7 and 2.8 respectively.

10.4.1.4      The design of footbridge was selected out of several alternative design options by public consultation progress. Consideration of alternatives scheme and the selection of preferred options are described in section 3.1 and 3.2 respectively. The criterion for the selection was based on aesthetic quality, functional requirements, buildability, operation performance and maintainability, creativity, and environmental impact purpose (refer to chapter 3).

10.4.1.5      During the public engagement conducted in March 2013 and April 2013, the public and Yuen Long District Council indicated strong support for the proposed footbridge and urged its early implementation. In addition, some DC members have requested early implementation of the proposed footbridge during the first special meeting of Traffic and Transport Committee under Yuen Long DC (DC Paper No. 65/2013) (refer to chapter 2).

10.4.1.6      As described in the EIA Study Brief, the scope of the Project includes:

·      construction of a covered footbridge of about 540m in length and 6m clear width with staircases / lifts / escalators along Yuen Long Town Nullah from West Rail Long Ping Station to the south of the Kau Yuk Road;

·      connection of the footbridge with West Rail Long Ping Station;

·      connection of the footbridge with at-grade footways in Yuen Long On Ling Road, Castle Peak Road – Yuen Long Section and Kau Yuk Road;

·      provision at the southern end of the footbridge to allow for future extension;

·      measures for mitigating drainage impact for the sections of Yuen Long Town Nullah underneath the footbridge;

·      landscaping and streetscape works of the footpaths along both sides of Yuen Long Town Nullah between West Rail Long Ping Station and Kau Yuk Road; and

·      associated civil, road, drainage, geotechnical, traffic aids, utility, diversion street lighting, landscaping, E&M works and environmental mitigation measures and temporary traffic arrangement during construction stage.

10.4.2         According to the EIA Study Brief No. ESB-278 /2014, the study area for the landscape impact assessment shall include all areas within 100m extended from the boundary of the scope of the EIA study as described in section 10.4.1.1 above. The assessment of landscape character areas will include all areas within the study area.  The assessment area for the visual impact assessment shall be defined by the visual envelope of the Project and associated works.

10.4.3         In this study, relevant Outline Development Plans (ODPs), Outline Zoning Plans (OZPs), Layout Plans and other relevant published land use plans, planning briefs and studies which may identify areas of high landscape value, open space and amenity area will be reviewed.  Any guidelines on landscape strategies, landscape frameworks, urban design concepts, building height profiles, special design areas, landmarks, designated view corridors, open space networks, landscape links that may affect the appreciation of the Project and associated works will also be reviewed.  

10.4.4         In the landscape assessment, the existing and planned landscape resources and character of the assessment areas will be described, appraised, analysed and evaluated.  Plans of suitable scale showing the baseline landscape resources and landscape character mapping of impact assessment are used to present the findings of impact assessment. 

10.4.5         A tree survey which identifies the species and approximate numbers to be affected is included in Appendix 10.1. The assessment focus on the sensitivity of the landscape framework and its ability to accommodate change.  The degree of compatibility of the Project and associated works with the existing and planned landscape settings will be identified.  The landscape impact assessment quantifies the potential landscape impacts as far as possible, so as to illustrate the significance of such impacts arising from the Project and associated works.  All landscape impacts are clearly mapped.

10.4.6         In the visual impact assessment, clear illustrations including mapping of visual impact will be provided.  The assessment includes:

·      Identification and plotting of visual envelope of the Project and associated works,

·      Identification of key groups of sensitive receivers within the visual envelope with regard to views from ground level, sea level and elevated vantage points,

·      Description of the visual compatibility of the Project and associated works within the surrounding, both existing and planned uses, its obstruction and interference with the key views of the adjacent areas, and

·      Description of severity of visual impacts in terms of nature, distance and number of sensitive receivers.  The visual impact of the Project and associated works with and without mitigations shall be assessed, and the effectiveness of the mitigation measures shall be demonstrated.

10.5                   Review of Planning and Development Control Framework

Review of the Outline Zoning Plans (OZPs)

10.5.1         A review of the existing and planned development framework for the proposed works and for the surroundings in Yuen Long has been considered. It aims to identify issues for the neighbouring planned land uses, to identify potential resources and sensitive receivers, and to ensure a high compatibility between the proposed project and the surroundings.

10.5.2         The Study Area is largely covered by OZPs. These are the Draft Yuen Long Outline Zoning Plan (No. S/YL/22) and Ping Shan Outline Zoning Plan (No. S/YL-PS/16). Based on desktop study, there will not be any impact on Draft Yuen Long Outline Zoning Plan (No. S/YL/22) and Ping Shan Outline Zoning Plan (No. S/YL-PS/16).  The review of OZPs has not only included a review of the plans, but also of the ‘Notes’ and “Explanatory Statements’ which accompany, and form part of, these plans ( refer to Drawing 10.1103).

10.5.3         It is considered that the proposed development and associated works are in principle following the planning intentions for the study areas as set out in the OZPs. However, the concept of proposed structures has been considered to a minimum impact. Enhanced connectivity to the public transportation and open space network from On Ning Road to Kau Yuk Road do reinforce the planning intentions of Yuen Long Urban Area.

Tentative Programme

10.5.4         The construction of the elevated corridor and associated works is anticipated to commence in 2018 for completion in Year 2022. It is anticipated that the development will be commissioned in phases. The tentative implementation programme is described in section 3.6, and summarized in Table 3.4 (refer to Chapter 3). 

10.6                   Baseline Study

10.6.1         The proposed footbridge are located at the town centre of Yuen Long, above Yuen Long Town Nullah from West Rail Long Ping Station (WRLPS) crossing over Yuen Long On Ning Road (YLONR), Castle Peak Road - Yuen Long Section (CPRYLS) to the south of Kau Yuk Road (KYR) with provision for future extension to Yuen Long South areas.

10.6.2         The proposed footbridge aligned along the centre of Yuen Long Main Nullah from the Yuen Long On Ning Road section to the Kau Yuk Road section, while the section between the Long Ping Station to Yuen Long On Ning Road will be aligned to the eastern side of the Nullah (refer to Drawing no. 10.1101-1102 for the footbridge location).

10.6.3         The land uses along the proposed footbridge are mainly residential and commercial mix uses, together with certain recreational uses. The dominant landscape element comes from the trees along both side of the nullah from Yuen Long On Ning Road, Castle Peak Road (Yuen Long Section) and Kau Yuk Road and the Po Fai Path,  Hi Lee Path, Yuan Fat Path, Cheong Sing Path and Chung Shing Path, as well as the below rest garden and playground:

-         Tai Pei Tau Rest Garden

-         Chung Sing Path Playground

-         Football pitch at the Hi Lee Path

Physical Landscape Resources

10.6.4         The baseline landscape resources that will be affected during the Construction Phase and Operation Phase, together with their sensitivity to change, are described in Table 10.2. In general, the landscape resources found within 100m LIA boundary were in high to medium landscape quality, some relatively mature vegetation and existing open space were classified as important resources and high in sensitivity. In addition, due to the local significant of the nullah, the Yuen Long nullah also classified as medium sensitivity although it’s lack of vegetation and low landscape quality. All landscape resources identified are:

                        - LR1 Trees at both side of existing nullah

                        - LR2 Tai Pei Tau Rest Garden

                        - LR3 Kik Yeung Road 5-a-side Football Pitch

                        - LR4 Chung Sing Path Playground

                        - LR5 Hi Lee Path

                        - LR6 Yuen Fat Path

                        - LR7 Chung Sing Path

                        - LR8 Cheong Shing Path

                        - LR9 Po Fai Path

                        - LR10 Yuen Long Town Nullah

                        - LR11 Street and Roadside Trees

                        - LR12 Yuen Long Children’s Playground

                        - LR13 Vegetation growth within rural village

                        - LR14 On Hing Playground

- LR15 Sai Ching Street Tennis Court and Sai Ching Street Children’s Playground

                        - LR16 Amenity Planting Area along Long Yip Street

                        - LR17 Vegetation Grown within Construction Site

The locations of baseline landscape resources are mapped in Drawing 10.1201.  Photo views illustrating the landscape resources within the study area are illustrated in drawing no.  10.1202-1204 inclusive. For ease of reference and co-ordination between text, tables and Drawings, each landscape resource is given an identity number.

Landscape Character Zones

10.6.5         Landscape character zones have been identified within the Study Area in accordance with the Study on Landscape Value Mapping of Hong Kong. These are described in Table 10.2 and illustrated in drawing no.  10.1301. Photo views illustrating the landscape character areas within the study area are illustrated in drawing no. 10.1302. All landscape character areas are identified as below:

                        - LCA1 Yuen Long Traditional Urban Landscape Character Area

                        - LCA2 Yuen Long Drainage Channel Landscape Area

                        - LCA3 Yuen Long Infrastructure Network West Rail – Long Ping Station

                        - LCA4 Yuen Long Miscellaneous Urban Fringe Landscape

                        - LCA5 Tai Kiu Tsuen Village Landscape

                        - LCA6 Residential Urban Landscape

                        - LCA7 Major Transportation Corridor Landscape

10.6.6         Three main landscape character zones have been identified within the 100m Study Area. These are described in Table 10.2 and illustrated in Drawing 10.1301.

Landscape Sensitivity to Change

10.6.7         The landscape resources and landscape character zones that will be potentially affected during the construction phase and operation phase, together with their sensitivity to change, are listed in Table 10.2.

 

Table 10.2     Baseline Landscape Resources (LRs) and Landscape Character Areas (LCAs) and its Sensitivity to Change

Id. No.

Landscape Resource/

Landscape Character Areas

LR1

Trees at both side of existing nullah

More than 80 nos. of existing trees line the two sides of Yuen Long Town Nullah within the 100n LIA study area. Trees are particularly lush along Hi Lee Path, Sau Fu Street, Yuen Fat Path and Chung Sing Path. Dominant species include Lagerstroemia speciosa, Bauhinia x blakeana and Ficus microcarpa. Those trees planted along the path are well maintained and generally in good to fair condition. However, some trees are found in poor health and form which grown on the nullah wall. The sizes are varies from 4m to 16m height. They soften the monotonous look of the nullah and provide valuable greening to the urbanized and busy Yuen Long town centre.

All tree species are commonly found in Hong Kong, their form and health are varies in different location, therefore, its landscape quality and maturity are generally considered as medium rating, its overall sensitivity is medium.

LR2

Tai Pei Tau Rest Garden

The Rest Garden (~0.2ha) is a passive recreational space containing a sitting out area location adjacent to the open car park are in Fung Lok Lane.

There are approximately 70 nos. of semi-mature trees planted mainly at the periphery of the rest garden. Trees are well maintained, sizes are varies from 2m to approx. 10m height. Major tree species include Ficus benjamina, Schefflera actinophylla, Aleurites moluccana, and Callistemon viminalis, and include 5 nos. of the rare and precious tree species Ailanthus fordii. The trees are an important element in diffusing the proposed elevated flyover and footbridge from the passive amenity space within the garden, which will not be directly affected by the works.

The form of the vegetation are generally good with proper maintenance, besides that some mature trees are found in this LR. Those seating benches, rain-shelters, and pavilions can provide leisure sitting-out function for the local residents. Due considering its important function for the local residents and the landscape quality of this LR, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR3

Kik Yeung Road 5-a-side Football Pitch

The public football ground (~0.2ha) is actively use by locals for physical activities with a small seating area adjacent to Hi Lee Path adjacent to the existing nullah. It is well maintained and provides both active and passive open space adjacent to the transportation node in Yuen Long (West) Bus Terminus in On Tat Square.

There are approximately 30 nos. of trees surrounding the football pitch which mainly comprise of Bauhinia x blakeana, Livistona chinensis and Ficus microcarpa. They are well maintained and sizes are generally 6m to 8m in height. One particular Ficus microcarpa at the Kik Yeung Road side is especially large-sized and well-formed.

It is an active ball court and its utilization rate is high for local residents, the ball court coating and its associate’s facilities are well maintained. Due considering its important function for the local residents, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR4

Chung Sing Path Playground

The basketball court (~0.22ha) adjacent to Chung Shing Path next to CCC Chun Kwong Primary School with 2 basketball court. The west boundary of the court is a sitting out area.

There are approximately 34 nos. of trees surrounding this playground, comprising roughly the same quantities of Aleurites moluccana, Crateva unilocularis, Bauhinia x blakeana, Reevesia thyrsoidea and a few Lagerstroemia speciosa. Trees are generally in medium size varies from 8m to 10m in height.

This playground included two active basketball court and its utilization rate is high for local residents. Its ball court facilities are well maintained by relevant department and up to standard (e.g. ball court coating, safety matt). The trees and shrubs planting are in common species, it can provide shading and leisure sitting out function for the passive area. Due considering its important function for the local residents, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR5

Hi Lee Path

The western boundary of the nullah and proposed works area on Hi Lee Path (~160m) is a green corridor through Castle Peak Road to On Ning Road.

Trees are planted in tree grilles at-grade tree pits and in raised planters with shrubs and ground cover. A leisure landscape feature in pergola and seating along with well-maintained trees species predominantly of Lagerstroemia speciosa and Bauhinia x blakeana provide providing an important visual relief to the place. There are approximately 22 nos. of trees along the nullah at Hi Lee Path. Small size trees (approx.4m height) are planted along the planter box aligning with the nullah wall, some relatively mature size trees (approx.8m to 10m height) are planted within tree pits. The trees are an important visual asset for Visual Sensitive Receivers (VSRs) in surrounding buildings and for pedestrians.

The vegetation found within this LR are in common species, and its landscape quality is considered as medium. The leisure walking path include sitting benches and trellis which can still provide resting function for local visitors. Due considering its landscape quality and maturity are general in medium rating, its overall sensitivity is considered as medium.

LR6

Yuen Fat Path

Yuen Fat Path and the north-south running section of Sau Fu Street (~160m) located on the eastern boundary of the nullah and parallel to Hi Lee Path.

There are approximately 20 nos. of trees along this section, with small sized (approx.4m height) Lagerstroemia speciosa on Sau Fu Street and a large group of mature Ficus microcarpa (approx.8m to 10m height) on Yuen Fat Path.

These dense tree planting is an effective buffer along the pathway and the busy Castle Peak Road (Yuen Long section).

Some mature Ficus microcarpa is found within this LR and acting as an important shading trees for the local residents. Although its quality of landscape is medium in rating, due considering its maturity and important function provided, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR7

Chung Sing Path

10.6.15     This path is a major pedestrian movement (~150m) along the nullah from North of Castle Peak Road to South of Kau Yuk Road; within this context there is CCC Chun Kwong Primary School, basketball court and playground.

10.6.16     There are approximately 16 nos. of trees (with approx. 8m to 10m height) planted on hard paved tree pits on the edge of the nullah, comprising mainly of Aleurites moluccana, Spathodea campanulata, Melia azedarach and Callistemon viminalis. The Ficus microcarpa located between CCC Chun Kwong Primary School and Chung Sing Path Playground is especially large-sized and well-formed. These trees provided an important greening element for the space.

It is an attractive pathway where trees are generally in good health and landscape quality. The trees are also provide an important shading function for the school students adjacent. Therefore, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR8

Cheong Shing Path

Cheong Shing Path (~150m) is opposite to Chung Sing Path in western side. The Rest Garden is enclosed on this walkway. Raised planter area and pergola with seating streetscape is well disturbance align with amenity trees and shrubs. This landscape quality is as peaceful amenity retreat for communities and pedestrians.

There are approximately 5 nos. of trees located in the space, comprising Acacia confusa, Celtis sinensis and Sapium sebiferum. Trees are relatively young in 4m to 6m height.

Due considering its landscape quality are general in medium rating, and the trees are found in relatively young and common species, its overall sensitivity is considered as medium.

LR9

Po Fai Path

This Path (~120m) is a main passage towards public transport node of West Rail Long Ping Station and adjacent Wang Lok Street transit area.

This LR is mainly a pedestrian access with relatively low landscape quality.

There are approximately 8 nos. of trees located in the space, comprising of 7 nos. of small sized (4m to 5m height) Bauhinia variegata on raised planters along the PTI, and a mix of fruit trees e.g. Clausena lansium, Mangifera indica and Dimocarpus longan in roadside tree pits near Yuen Long On Ning Road.

Although the landscape quality of this LR is low, it was still an important leisure pedestrian walkway for the residents and visitors, therefore it overall sensitivity is considered as medium.

Po Fai Path have similar function as LR8, trees are found in common species and relatively young. Due considering its maturity are general in medium rating, and its vegetation are in relatively poor form and health, its overall sensitivity is considered as medium.

LR10

Yuen Long Town Nullah

A channelised, hard paved drainage (~32m width) from north to south across Yuen Long town centre, and it is a designated view corridor and pedestrian network alongside with recreational, commercials and institutional facilities through On Ning Road to Kau Yuk Road; withhold a strong local identity in historical and cultural significances.

Although it is lack of vegetation found within this LR and its concrete treatment was in poor appearance, due considering its significant character and importance to the Yuen Long district, its overall sensitivity is considered as medium.

LR11

Street and Roadside Trees

This LR comprises of street trees within the study area that are not covered by other LRs.

 Due to the congested urban space, trees within Yuen Long town centre are mainly found along the nullah, in/around rest gardens and playgrounds, while other street trees within the study area are mainly located in those paths with only pedestrian access.

These trees are found e.g. next to MTR Long Ping Station, in-between Yuen Long Plaza and Kik Yeung Road PTI, along Sau Fu Street, and on Tai Pei Tau Path. Trees are generally in narrow form and mostly over 10m in height.

Trees comprise mainly of common amenity species such as Lagerstroemia speciosa, Ficus microcarpa, Bombax ceiba, Celtis sinensis and Melaleuca cajuputi subsp. cumingiana, and generally of good to fair landscape quality.

No trees in this LR will be affected by the projects. The vegetation found in this LR are common species in Hong Kong, it mainly provide green screening effect for the road. Its landscape quality and maturity are general in medium rating, its overall sensitivity is considered as medium.

LR12

Yuen Long Children’s Playground

This playground (approx. 2913 sq.m.) is located in Yuen Long Hong Lok Road.

There are not many trees within this large playground, nevertheless all the dominant trees are of very large size and high landscape quality (over 20m height). 

There are 9 nos. of such large trees which include Bombax ceiba, Aleurites moluccana, Ficus virens and Ficus microcarpa. Other trees of lesser dominance include Juniperus chinensis ‘Kaizuca’ and Murraya paniculata.

There are total approximately 20 nos. of trees surrounding this open space. This playground included two basketball court and children play facilities, which act as important function for the local residents, and those facilities are well maintained by relevant department. Due considering its important function for the local residents, and the existing trees can also provide shading for the local people, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR13

Vegetation growth within rural village

This LR represent the vegetation within the Tai Kiu Tsuen adjacent to the Tai Kiu Road. They are mainly Ficus microcarpa, Ficus virens and a mix of fruit trees e.g. Clausena lansium, Mangifera indica and Dimocarpus longan in the periphery of the village. Trees are found in mature size (generally over 10m) with high landscape quality and shading function.

Although trees species are common in Hong Kong, it grown in mature form and provide important shading function for Tai Kiu Village. Due considering its maturity and quality of trees are high, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR14

On Hing Playground

This playground (approx. 5630 sq.m.) is located in the On Leung Lane.

There are approximately 15 trees within this playground, mainly planted within the sitting-out area along the northern side of the football pitch. Major tree species include Bauhinia x blakeana and Lagerstroemia speciosa.

The southwest corner of the playground is dominated by a large sized (over 10m in height) Celtis sinensis in good condition. All trees are well maintained and generally of high to fair landscape quality. There is also a dense row of Cinnamomum camphora in tree pits at the south outside the playground. The sitting-out and play facilities provided an important leisure open space for the public.

This is the only large soccer patch in the local area, therefore its utilization rate is high. The adjacent amenity trees are also high in landscape value. Due considering its important function for the local residents, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR15

Sai Ching Street Tennis Court and Sai Ching street Children’s Playground

The Sai Ching Street Children’s Playground and Sai Ching Street Tennis Court (approx. 4772 sq.m.) is located in the Sai Ching Street, in which part of it is within the landscape assessment area. The sitting-out and play facilities provided an important leisure open space for the public.

There are approximately 50 nos. of trees located within the Sai Ching Street Children’s Playground, comprising mainly of Livistona chinensis, Araucaria heterophylla, Bauhinia x blakeana and Phoenix roebelenii.

In addition, the playground’s entrance at Sai Ching Street is adorned by two fine specimens of Phoenix sylvestris. Trees within the playground are generally well maintained and of high to fair landscape quality.

For the Sai Ching Street Tennis Court, there are approximately 20 nos. of trees located in the courtyard and the periphery of the tennis fields, and comprise mainly of mature (approx. 8m to 10m in height) Aleurites moluccana and Araucaria heterophylla. These trees are well maintained and of high to fair landscape quality.

Although its planting is common and not mature, the amenity and form are considered as good. Hard landscape features like paving, pavilion are well maintained. Due considering its important function for the local residents, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR16

Amenity Planting Area along Long Yip Street

This is an amenity area with sitting-out facilities. It acting as a sitting out area for the adjacent residents. Flowering trees and shrubs were well maintained by relevant government.

There are approximately 10 nos. of trees located within this area. Dominate tree species included Delonix regia, Roystonea regia, and Melaleuca cajuputi subsp. cumingiana. Trees are generally young with size between 4 to 6m height. Shrubs species such as Cordyline fruticosa, Alpinia speciosa, and Loropetalum chinense f. rubrum were found.

By considering its landscape quality of vegetation are high and well maintenance, and it is a rare area found with high amenity vegetation value, its overall sensitivity is considered as high.

LR17

Vegetation Grown within Construction Site

Some existing trees are found along the edge of the construction site. They are over 10m in height. However, those trees are currently in poor form and landscape quality. The limited planting area and adjacent construction activities were also affecting the vegetation’s health.  The sensitivity of this LR is low due to its poor form and health of vegetation growth.

LCA1

Yuen Long Traditional Urban Landscape Character Area

This area covers the core of Yuen Long town typically comprises a small area of narrow streets on orthogonal grid with medium rise older building stock.

Vegetation is very limited to occasional street tree planting or amenity planting in sitting-out areas. However, the formation of the building character is consider significance to the Yuen Long district and medium in importance. Therefore, the overall sensitivity shall be medium

Landscape resources included in this LCA: LR11, LR15.

LCA2

Yuen Long Drainage Channel Landscape Area

This area is occupied primarily medium rise older building block with mixture use at ground level and residential properties above. Drainage Channel is hard paved alongside with line of trees provided shady resting area on both side of narrow pathway created an intimate scale amenity area.

Collective pedestrian movement and commercial activities adjacent with small recreational ground created provided both active and passive vibrant character to the area.

Similar as LR10, although it is lack of vegetation found within this area and its concrete treatment was in poor appearance, due considering its significant character and importance to the Yuen Long district, its overall sensitivity is considered as medium.

Landscape resources included in this LCA: LR1, LR5, LR6, LR7, LR8, LR9, LR10.

LCA3

Yuen Long Infrastructure Network West Rail – Long Ping Station

This LCA refers to the Yuen Long infrastructure network of West Rail – Long Ping Station.

There is no vegetation growth and its appearance is general poor. There is no landscape value in this LCA. Its overall sensitivity is low.

LCA4

Yuen Long Miscellaneous Urban Fringe Landscape

This area comprised with institution, leisure, and industrial settlement, they were generally distributed all around the Yuen Long district in organic form.

This LCA have similar character with LCA1, vegetation growth was limited due the site constraint. However, there are still some landscape resources found within this LCA. The overall sensitivity is considered as medium.

Landscape resources included in this LCA: LR2, LR3, LR4, LR11, LR12, LR14, LR16, LR17.

LCA5

Tai Kiu Tsuen Village Landscape

This landscape character area covers approximately 2 ha, which has its own history around several hundred years. The landscape setting was distinguish from the surrounding Yuen Long Urban town. Two to three storey of rural housing were scattered within that area with several mature size trees.

Trees are found in mature size within this area, and the landscape character is distinguish in Yuen Long district. By considering on its high significant and maturity of the landscape. The overall sensitivity is considered as high.

Landscape resources included in this LCA: LR13

LCA6

Residential Urban Landscape

Several high-rise residential buildings were found. They were relatively newer and under proper maintenance comparing with its surrounding low-rise settlement. However, vegetation is still limited by the overall congesting urban form. No mature vegetation is found. Therefore, its overall sensitivity is considered as low.

LCA7

Major Transportation Corridor Landscape

This landscape character area represent the major traffic road included Castle Peak Road, On Ling Road, and Kau Yuk Road. Those road and the existing nullah were bisecting the site area into several groups of building. The road was under heavy traffic, and lack of vegetation growth. The landscape quality and maturity shall be low. Therefore the overall sensitivity of this LCA is considered as low.

 

 

 


Table 10.2b Landscape Resources / Landscape Character Areas and their sensitivity to change

Id. No.

Landscape Resources / Landscape Character Areas

Quality

(High/Medium/Low)

Importance and Rarity

(High/Medium/Low)

Ability to accommodate change

(High/Medium/Low)

Importance of landscape resources in local and regional context

(Local/Regional/

National/Global)

Maturity

(High/Medium/Low)

Sensitivity to Change

(Low, Medium, High)

Landscape Resources (LRs)

LR1

Trees at both side of existing nullah

Medium

Medium

Medium

Local

Medium

Medium

LR2

Tai Pei Tau Rest Garden

Medium

High

Medium

Local

High

High

LR3

Kik Yeung Road 5-a-side Football Pitch

Medium

High

Medium

Local

Medium

High

LR4

Chung Sing Path Playground

Medium

High

Medium

Local

Medium

High

LR5

Hi Lee Path

Medium

Medium

Medium

Local

Medium

Medium

LR6

Yuen Fat Path

 

Medium

Medium

Medium

Local

High

High

LR7

Chung Sing Path

 

High

Medium

Medium

Local

High

High

LR8

Cheong Shing Path

Medium

Medium

Medium

Local

Low

Medium

LR9

Po Fai Path

Low

High

Medium

Local

Medium

Medium

LR10

Yuen Long Town Nullah

 

Low

High

High

Local

Low

Medium

LR11

Street and Roadside Trees

 

Medium

Medium

Medium

Local

Medium

Medium

LR12

Yuen Long Children’s Playground

High

High

Medium

Local

Medium

High

LR13

Vegetation growth within rural village

High

High

Medium

Local

High

High

LR14

On Hing Playground

High

High

Medium

Local

High

High

LR15

Sai Ching Street Tennis Court and Sai Ching street Children’s Playground

High

High

Medium

Local

Medium

High

LR16

Amenity Planting Area along Long Yip Street

High

High

Medium

Local

Medium

High

LR17

Vegetation Grown within Construction Site

Low

Low

High

Local

Medium

Low

Landscape Character Areas (LCAs)

LCA1

Yuen Long Traditional Urban Landscape Character Area

 

Low

Medium

Medium

Local

Medium

Medium

LCA2

Yuen Long Drainage Channel Landscape Area

 

Low

High

High

Local

Low

Medium

LCA3

Yuen Long Infrastructure Network West Rail – Long Ping Station

Low

Medium

Medium

Local

Low

Low

LCA4

Yuen Long Miscellaneous Urban Fringe Landscape

Medium

Medium

Medium

Local

Medium

Medium

LCA5

Tai Kiu Tsuen Village Landscape

High

High

Medium

Local

High

High

LCA6

Residential Urban Landscape

Low

Medium

Medium

Local

Low

Low

LCA7

Major Transportation Corridor Landscape

Low

Medium

Medium

Local

Low

Low

 


 


Tree Survey

10.6.8         The tree survey was conducted in May 2015 to assess all existing trees within the project works limit. A total of 125 nos. surveyed trees within the works limit belonging to 26 species were recorded in this tree survey, and is summarized in Table 10.3. A tree survey within the project works limit has been undertaken in accordance with DEVB TCW No. 07/2015 - Tree Preservation, and the tree survey and recommendation plan is under Appendix 10.1.

10.6.10       There is no Registered Old and Valuable Tree (OVT), “Important Tree”, stonewall tree, within the landscape impact study boundary. 

10.6.11       However, there are 5 no. of Ailanthus fordii trees located in the LR2, which are Rare and precious tree species included in “Rare and Precious Plants of Hong Kong” (AFCD, 2003) or “Forest and Countryside Ordinance” (Cap. 96). Those Ailanthus fordii are located outside the project works limit, but within the 100m landscape study area.

Table 10.3   Surveyed Trees Species and Quantity within works limit

Scientific Name

Chinese Name

Quantity

Bauhinia variegata

宮粉羊蹄甲

8

Acacia confusa

台灣相思

2

Aleurites moluccana

石栗

2

Bauhinia x blakeana

洋紫荊

18

Bischofia javanica

秋楓

1

Callistemon viminalis

串錢柳

6

Celtis sinensis

朴樹

5

Clausena lansium

黃皮

3

Delonix regia

鳳凰木

1

Dimocarpus longan

龍眼

3

Ficus benjamina

垂榕

1

Ficus microcarpa

細葉榕

9

Ilex rotunda var. microcarpa

小果鐵冬青

1

Lagerstroemia speciosa

大花紫薇

29

Macaranga tanarius var. tomentosa

血桐

11

Mangifera indica

杧果

2

Melaleuca cajuputi subsp. cumingiana

白千層

5

Melia azedarach

4

Michelia x alba

白蘭

1

Spathodea campanulata

火焰木

4

Sterculia lanceolata

假蘋婆

2

Bombax ceiba

木棉

1

Casuarina equisetifolia

木麻黃

1

Eucalyptus citriodora

檸檬桉

1

Ficus virens

黃葛樹

2

Pterocarpus indicus

紫檀

2

Total Quantity of Surveyed Trees

125

 

Zone of Visual Influence (ZVI)

10.6.9         The ZVI for the Project during the construction phase are illustrated in Drawing no. 10.1401. Photo views illustrating the Visual Sensitive Receivers (VSRs) within the ZVI are illustrated in Drawing 10.1402-1407. Visual Envelope of the project is bounded by the buildings along both side of the existing nullah; the industrial buildings and the Long Ping Station to the north; and the Ma Tong Road to the south. The ZVI adopts a cut-off at the Ma Tong Road as the only potential VSRs beyond this would be traveller along Kung Um Road, Tai Shu Ha Road East and Shap Pat Heung Road from which visual impacts would be negligible due to their distant location (refer to drawing no. 10.1401). 

Visual Sensitive Receivers (VSRs)

10.6.10       Table 10.4 lists the key VSRs found within the ZVIs, and are mapped in Drawing no. 10.1401. Photo views illustrating the VSRs within the study area are shown in Drawing no. 10.1402-1407. For ease of reference, each VSR is given an identity number, which is used in all relevant tables and Drawings in this report.

10.6.11       There are no vantage points identified in the Urban Design Guidelines under Hong Kong Planning Standards and Guidelines.

10.6.12       VSR are divided into 6 types: Comprehensive Development, Commercial and Residential, Residential, Open Space, Government, Institution or Community, Recreational and Transportation related. The type of VSRs is classified according to whether the person is at home, at work, at play, or travelling. Those who view the impact from their homes are considered to be highly sensitive as the attractiveness or otherwise of the outlook from their home will have a substantial effect on their perception of the quality and acceptability of their home environment and their general quality of life. Those who view the impact from their workplace are considered to be only moderately sensitive as the attractiveness or otherwise of the outlook will have a less important, although still material, effect on their perception of their quality of life. The degree to which this applies depends on whether the workplace is industrial, retail or commercial. Those who view the impact whilst taking part in an outdoor leisure activity may display varying sensitivity depending on the type of leisure activity. Those who view the impact whilst travelling on a public thoroughfare will generally have low sensitivity.

10.6.13       The sensitivity of the VSRs shall also be determined by numbers of the individuals within the VSR category, the quality of existing views, availability of alternative views, amenity of alternative views, degree of visibility, duration of view and frequency of view.

 


 

Visual Resources

10.6.14      Yuen Long Nullah locats at the centre of Yuen Long Town, connecting the urbanized town at the north and the natural landscape at the south.  Development along the side of the nullah are mainly open space, GIC facilities, low-rise commercial/residential and some medium rise residential developments. Surrounded by this highly urbanized townscape, Yuen Long Nullah becomes a major visual relief to the town.

10.6.15        As most of the views at the street level to the east and the west along the nullah are being blocked by the residential buildings, Yuen Long Nullah forms a visual corridor for leisure and recreational users along the nullah. It is an important visual resource of Yuen Long Town.

10.6.16      Currently, the hard surface and channelization of the nullah, the incoherent buildings along both side of the nullah and the lacked of maintenance and disorder of the paving pattern have inevitably downgraded the visual quality of the visual corridor.

10.6.17        However, there are several amenity planting along both side of the nullah, which forms a green corridor for the visual relief. Also, beautification works of the nullah will be held in the future under another separate project, it is foreseeable that upon beautification, visual quality of Yuen Long Nullah will be further enhanced and public open space along the nullah will become more important leisure space to the local community.

 


Table 10.4   Visual Sensitive Receivers (VSRs) and Their Sensitivity to Change

Id. No.

Key Visual Sensitive Receivers (VSRs)

Type of VSRs

Number of Individuals (Many/ Medium/ Few/ Very Few)

Quality of Existing View

(Good/ Fair/ Poor)

Quality of Existing View – with Planned Nullah beautification

(Good/ Fair/ Poor)

Availability of Alternative Views

(Yes/ No)

Degree of Visibility (Full/ Partial/ Glimpse)

Frequency of View (Very Frequent/ Frequent/ Occasional/ Rare)

Sensitivity to Change

(Low, Medium, High)

Comprehensive Development Area

CDA1

Future Tai Kiu Property Development

Commercials /

Residential

Many

Fair

Good

Yes

Full

Very Frequent

High

CDA2

Future Long Ping South Lot. 512 Development

Commercials /

Residential

Many

Fair

Good

Yes

Full

Very Frequent

High

CDA3

Future Kwong Yip Street Development

( The Spectra)

Commercials /

Residential

Many

Poor

Fair

Yes

Glimpse

Occasional

Medium

Residential Development

R1

Yen Tsui Gardens, Po Fai Building, Man Yip Building, Shung Tak Building & Fuk Yip Building

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Poor

Fair

No

Full

Very Frequent

High

R2

Yuen Tung Building, Hong Shing Building, Fung Yue Building, Kinston Court, Fuk Chiu House, Wing Tai Building, Chi King House

Commercial

Many

Poor

Fair

No

Full

Very Frequent

High

R3

Kei Yip Building, On Ning Building, King Wah Building and Yuen Cheong House

Residential/

Commercial

Medium

Fair

Good

Yes

Partial

Frequent

High

R4

Yee Fung Garden

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Fair

Good

Yes

Partial

Occasional

Medium

R5

Wah Kin Building, Chuk Bun Building & Ho Wang Building

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Fair

Good

Yes

Partial

Occasional

Medium

R6

Ho Shing Building, Kam On Building, Kam Hei House, Happy House, Nan Tin Mansion & Kam Fai House

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Fair

Good

No

Full

Very Frequent

High

R7

Siu Fung Building, Shun Fat House, Lee Fat Building

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Poor

Fair

No

Full

Very Frequent

High

R8

Ho Shin Fuk Building

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Fair

Good

No

Full

Very Frequent

High

R9

Tai Kiu Village

Residential/

Commercial

Few

Fair

Good

No

Full

Very Frequent

Medium

R10

Future High-rise Residential Building

(Yuccie Square)

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Fair

Fair

Yes

Partial

Occasional

Medium

R11

Fook On Building

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Poor

Fair

No

Full

Very Frequent

High

Commercial and Residential Development

CR1

Campbell Building, Man Cheong Building and Kan Yip Building

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Fair

Fair

Yes

Partial

Occasional

Medium

CR2

Yuen Long Plaza

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Good

Good

Yes

Partial

Occasional

Medium

CR3

Fuk Sing Building, Fu Hing Building, Wah Cheung Mansion and Wah Shing Mansion, Yuen Long Mansion & Tung Fook Building

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Fair

Good

Yes

Full

Frequent

High

CR4

Healey Building, Kin Shing Building and Yuen Fat Building

Residential/

Commercial

Many

Poor

Fair

Yes

Full

Frequent

High

Open Space Development

O1

Football Pitch at Hi Lee Path

Recreational

Medium

Good

Good

Yes

Full

Frequent

Medium

O2

Tai Pei Tau Rest Garden

Recreational

Medium

Good

Good

Yes

Full

Frequent

High

O3

Basketball Court at Chung Sing Path

Recreational

Medium

Good

Good

Yes

Full

Frequent

Medium

Government, Institution or Community Development Area

GIC1

Kik Yeung Road Bus Terminus

Occupational/ Transportation

Few

Fair

Fair

Yes

Partial

Occasional

Low

GIC2

Fung Lok Lane Car park and Maxwell House

Commercial, Residential

Few

Fair

Fair

Yes

Partial

Occasional

Medium

GIC3

CCC Chun Kwong Primary School

Institutional

Medium

Fair

Good

Yes

Partial

Occasional

Medium

GIC4

Caritas Yuen Long Chan Chun Ha Prevocational School

Institutional

Medium

Fair

Good

Yes

Partial

Occasional

Low

Recreational

REC1

Travellers along Yuen Long Town Nullah

Recreational

Many

Fair

Good

Yes

Full

Frequent

High

REC2

Travellers along the crossing of Yuen Long Nullah and major road

Recreational

Many

Good

Good

Yes

Full

Occasional

High

Transportation Development

T1

West Rail Long Ping Station

Transportation

Many

Fair

Good

Yes

Full

Frequent

High

T2

On Ning Road

Transportation

Many

Fair

Fair

Yes

Partial

Rare

Low

T3

Castle Peak Road – Yuen Long

Transportation

Many

Fair

Fair

Yes

Partial

Rare

Low

T4

Kau Yuk Road

Transportation