Environmental Impact Assessment

 

Proposed Development at

 

Fung Lok Wai, Yuen Long

 

Lot 1457 R. P. in D.D. 123

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CH2M HILL Hong Kong Limited

in association with

 

RPS

ADI Ltd.

Archaeological Assessments

MVA Hong Kong Limited

 

 

 

Reference                     R228-2.07

 

Client                            Mutual Luck Investment Limited

 

Date                             July 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

1.           Introduction_ 1-1

1.1     Background_ 1-1

1.2     Historical Land Use of the Site_ 1-1

1.3     Ecological Importance of Fish Ponds 1-2

1.4     Project Objective_ 1-2

1.5     Objectives of the EIA Study 1-2

1.6     Scope of the EIA_ 1-3

1.7     Structure of the EIA_ 1-5

2.           Project description_ 2-7

2.1     The Proposed Development and the Environs 2-7

2.2     Construction of the Project 2-9

2.3     Potential Concurrent Projects that Could Lead to Cumulative Impacts 2-14

3.           Consideration of alternatives schemes_ 3-1

3.1     Background_ 3-1

3.2     Identified constraints 3-1

3.3     Modifications of the development proposal to meet the identified constraints 3-1

3.4     Shifting of Residential Development Area_ 3-1

3.5     Alternative Route for Development Access 3-2

3.6     Establishment of a potential alternative egretry within the Wetland Nature Reserve_ 3-4

3.7     Consideration of Alternative Building Heights 3-4

3.8     Comparison of Development Options 3-5

3.9     The Preferred Development Option_ 3-8

4.           air quality impact_ 4-1

4.1     Introduction_ 4-1

4.2     Legislation and Guidelines 4-1

4.3     Ambient Air Quality 4-2

4.4     Construction Phase Impact 4-2

4.5     Operational Phase Impact 4-8

4.6     Conclusion_ 4-9

5.           Noise impact assessment_ 5-1

5.1     Introduction_ 5-1

5.2     Background Information and Relevant Studies 5-1

5.3     Possible Cumulative Impact 5-1

5.4     Assessment Area_ 5-2

5.5     Noise Sensitive Receivers 5-2

5.6     Construction Phase Impact 5-3

5.7     Operational Phase Impact 5-16

5.8     Impacts Summary and Conclusion_ 5-18

6.           Water quality impact assessment_ 6-1

6.1     Introduction_ 6-1

6.2     Description of Existing Water Systems and Respective Catchments 6-1

6.3     Characterisation of Baseline Water & Sediment Quality 6-3

6.4     Existing and Planned Activities In Relation to Water Systems 6-12

6.5     Identification of Alteration of Water Systems Arising from the Project 6-14

6.6     Identification of Existing and Future Water & Sediment Pollution Sources 6-15

6.7     Identification of Water Sensitive Receivers 6-17

6.8     Water and Sediment Quality Assessment Criteria and Existing Policies 6-18

6.9     Water and Sediment Quality Impact Assessment 6-20

6.10   Recommendations of Mitigation Measures 6-22

6.11   Conclusion_ 6-25

7.           Potential Problem of Biogas_ 7-1

7.1     Introduction_ 7-1

7.2     Assessment Methodology 7-1

7.3     Field Sampling and Laboratory Analysis 7-1

7.4     Risk Assessment Criterion_ 7-2

7.5     Estimation of potential Gas Emissions 7-3

7.6     Evaluation of Significance of Potential Gas Emissions 7-6

7.7     Monitoring, Mitigation and Precautionary Measures 7-7

7.8     Impacts Summary and Conclusion_ 7-8

8.           Sewerage and Sewage Treatment Implications_ 8-1

8.1     Introduction_ 8-1

8.2     Existing Sewage Disposal and Treatment Facilities 8-1

8.3     Planned Sewage Disposal and Treatment Facilities in the Area_ 8-2

8.4     Planned Population and Sewerage Flows Projections 8-2

8.5     Proposed Development, Sewerage Options and Projection_ 8-3

8.6     Adequacy of Existing and Planned Sewerage and Treatment Facilities to accept flows 8-3

8.7     New & Upgrading Works of Sewerage Systems Required for Either Options 8-4

8.8     Environmental Impacts of Sewerage Systems 8-5

8.9     Preliminary Design, Operation and Maintenance Requirements of the Proposed Sewerage System for Either Options 8-6

8.10   Conclusion_ 8-8

9.           Waste Management_ 9-1

9.1     Introduction_ 9-1

9.2     Legislation and Guidelines 9-1

9.3     Analysis of Activities and Waste Generation_ 9-2

9.4     Proposal for Waste Management 9-7

9.5     Impacts Summary and Conclusion_ 9-8

10.          cultural heritage impact assessment_ 10-1

10.1   Introduction_ 10-1

10.2   Objectives of the Cultural Heritage Impact Assessment (CHIA) 10-1

10.3   CHIA Methodology 10-1

10.4   The Study Area_ 10-2

10.5   Historical Buildings and Structures Survey 10-2

10.6   Historical Landscape Features Survey 10-9

10.7   Summary of the CHIA Findings and Recommendations 10-11

10.8   References 10-12

11.          LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT_ 11-1

11.1   Introduction_ 11-1

11.2   Standards and Legislation_ 11-1

11.3   Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment Methodology 11-2

11.4   Selection of the Preferred Option_ 11-7

11.5   Review of Planning and Development Control Framework 11-15

11.6   Review of Study on the Ecological Value of Fish Ponds in Deep Bay Area_ 11-20

11.7   Existing Landscape Context 11-21

11.8   Landscape Impact Assessment 11-22

11.9   Existing Visual Context and Visual Impacts 11-44

11.10  Cumulative Impacts 11-66

11.11  Mitigation Measures 11-66

11.12  Programme for Landscape Works 11-72

11.13  Operational (Residual) Landscape and Visual Impacts 11-86

11.14  Conclusion_ 11-89

12.          Fisheries impact assessment_ 12-1

12.1   Introduction_ 12-1

12.2   Methods 12-2

12.3   Description of the Physical Environment 12-2

12.4   Baseline condition_ 12-8

12.5   Impact Identification and Assessment 12-10

12.6   Fisheries Mitigation / Compensation Measures 12-15

12.7   Monitoring and Audit Programme_ 12-15

12.8   Conclusion_ 12-16

12.9   References/ Bibliography 12-16

13.          Ecological impact Assessment_ 13-1

13.1   Introduction_ 13-1

13.2   Description of the Physical Environment 13-3

13.3   Literature Review_ 13-6

13.4   Review of Recognised Sites of Conservation Importance in the Vicinity of Fung Lok Wai 13-7

13.5   Field Survey Methodology 13-12

13.6   General Ecological Profile and Evaluation of Valued ecological Components 13-19

13.7   Identification of Potential Impacts 13-44

13.8   Evaluation of impacts 13-49

13.9   Mitigation Measures 13-69

13.10  Identification and evaluation of residual ecological impacts 13-86

13.11  Ecological Monitoring and Audit 13-87

13.12  References 13-88

14.          Draft Habitat creation and Management PLan FOR the Wetland NaTure Reserve  14-1

14.1   Study background and objectives 14-1

14.2   Mitigation objectives 14-10

14.3   Detailed design and construction methods 14-15

14.4   Management Strategy 14-26

14.5   Monitoring and action plans 14-35

14.6   HCMP Reporting and Review process 14-39

14.7   References 14-43

15.          The Long-term Management OF the Wetland NAture Reserve_ 15-1

15.1   Introduction_ 15-1

15.2   Overview of Wetland Nature Reserve Management Arrangements 15-1

15.3   Management of the Wetland Nature Reserve_ 15-2

15.4   Conclusions 15-3

16.          Environmental monitoring and audit (EM&A) requirements_ 16-1

16.1   Introduction_ 16-1

16.2   Objectives of Environmental Monitoring and Audit 16-1

16.3   Summary of Areas Requiring EM&A_ 16-1

16.4   Air Quality 16-1

16.5   Noise Monitoring_ 16-2

16.6   Water Quality 16-2

16.7   Waste Management 16-2

16.8   Ecology 16-3

16.9   Landscape and Visual 16-3

16.10  Cultural Heritage_ 16-3

16.11  Implementation Schedule of Environmental Mitigation Measures 16-3

17.          Summary of environmental outcomes and overall conclusion_ 17-1

17.1   Introduction_ 17-1

17.2   Key Environmental Issues 17-1

17.3   Air Quality Impact 17-1

17.4   Noise Impacts 17-2

17.5   Water Quality 17-3

17.6   Potential Problem of Biogas 17-4

17.7   Sewerage and Sewerage Treatment Implications 17-4

17.8   Waste Management 17-5

17.9   Ecological Impact Assessment 17-6

17.10  Fisheries Impact Assessment 17-8

17.11  Cultural Heritage Impact Assessment 17-8

17.12  Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment 17-9

17.13  Overall Conclusion_ 17-11

 

 

Volume 3

LIST OF APPENDICES

Appendix 1-1    Study Brief

Appendix 4-1    Calculation of Particulate Emission Rates for Fugitive Dust Impact Assessment

Appendix 4-2    Typical FDM Result File for Fugitive Dust Impact Assessment

Appendix 5-1    PME Equipment Inventory for Construction Noise Impact Assessment

Appendix 5-2    Typical Calculation Worksheet for Construction Noise Impact Assessment

(Unmitigated Scenario)

Appendix 5-3    Silenced PME Equipment Inventory for Construction Noise Impact Assessment

Appendix 5-4    Typical Calculation Worksheet for Construction Noise Impact Assessment

(With Silenced PME)

Appendix 5-5    Reduced SWL of the PME when noise barriers and machinery enclosures applied

Appendix 5-6    Typical Calculation Worksheet for Construction Noise Impact Assessment

(Silenced PME with noise barriers and machinery enclosures)

Appendix 8-1    Sewerage Impact Assessment

Appendix 10-1   Historical buildings and Structures Catalogue  

Appendix 11-1   Preliminary Tree Survey Report

Appendix 13-1  Ramsar Classification System for Wetlands

Appendix 13-2  Photographs of each habitat type defined within the Assessment Area for the proposed development at Fung Lok Wai.

Appendix 13-3  Vegetation survey results, site wide excluding route of original proposed access road.

Appendix 13-4  Aquatic invertebrates recorded at Fung Lok Wai during the required survey period.

Appendix 13-5   Odonata species recorded at Fung Lok Wai during the required survey period.

Appendix 13-6   Butterfly species recorded at Fung Lok Wai during the required survey period.

Appendix 13-7   Fish species recorded during surveys at Fung Lok Wai

Appendix 13-8   Amphibian species recorded during surveys at Fung Lok Wai

Appendix 13-9   Reptile species recorded during surveys at Fung Lok Wai

Appendix 13-10 Summary bird survey results from transects T1-5 and T7

Appendix 13-11 Summary bird survey results from transect T6

Appendix 13-12 Analysis of recent bird records within the Deep Bay area

Appendix 14-1   Generic Bund Designs

Appendix 14-2   Water Budget

Appendix 14-3   Planting Zones

Appendix 14-4   Specification for footpaths/ broad walks

Appendix 14-5   Indicative design of hides

Appendix 14-6   Details of Floating Platforms

Appendix 16-1   Implementation Schedule of Recommended Environmental Mitigation Measures


LIST OF ANNEX

 

Annex                                      A Proposal for the Management of HKSAR WETLAND NATURE FOUNDATION

 

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1‑1       The Proposed Development 1-6

Figure 2‑1       The Proposed Development and the Environs 2-15

Figure 2‑2       Extract of Tin Shui Wai, Lau Fau Shan & Tsim Bei Tsui Zoning Plan_ 2-16

Figure 2‑3       Tentative MLP of the Proposed Residential Development 2-17

Figure 2‑4       The Assessment Area_ 2-18

Figure 2‑5       Tentative Layout Plan of Wetland Nature Reserve 2-19

Figure 2‑6       Existing Drainage and Catchment Area in the Vicinity 2-20

Figure 2‑7       Tentative Construction Programme for the Project 2-21

Figure 2‑8       The Proposed Access Road of the Development 2-22

Figure 2‑9       Pond Numbering System Used Prior to WNR Establishment 2-23

Figure 2‑10     Pond Enhancement Sectors of the Proposed WNR_ 2-24

Figure 2‑11      Locations of New Bunds and the Removal / Modification Sequence of the Bunds 2-25

Figure 2‑12     Possible Concurrent Projects in the Vicinity 2-26

Figure 3‑1       The Original Preliminary Layout of the Project 3-9

Figure 3‑2       The Modified Development 3-10

Figure 3‑3a     The Three Building Height Scenarios – Option 1A_ 3-11

Figure 3‑3b     The Three Building Height Scenarios – Option 1B_ 3-12

Figure 3‑3c      The Three Building Height Scenarios – Option 1C_ 3-13

Figure 3‑4       Photomontages of the Three Building Height Scenarios 3-14

Figure 3‑5       Original Location and Shifted Location of the Proposed Residential Development 3-15

Figure 4‑1       Location of Representative ASRs for Construction Dust Impact Assessment 4-10

Figure 4‑2       The Alignment of Haul Roads, Locations of Representative Emission Points of Stage A_ 4-11

Figure 4‑3       The Alignment Of Haul Roads, Locations Of Representative Emission Points Of Stage B_ 4-12

Figure 4‑4       Mitigated Maximum Hourly Average TSP Concentrations Predicted at 10.0 mPD under Stage A  4-13

Figure 4‑5       Mitigated Daily Average TSP Concentrations Predicted at 5.3mPD under Stage A_ 4-14

Figure 4‑6       Mitigated Maximum Hourly Average TSP Concentrations Predicted at 6.3mPD under Stage B  4-15

Figure 4‑7       Mitigated Maximum Daily average TSP Concentrations Predicted at 6.3mPD under Stage B  4-16

Figure 5‑1       Locations of the Representative Assessment Point (RAPs) selected for Construction Noise Impact Assessment 5-19

Figure 5‑2       The Noise Sensitive Receivers around the Site 5-20

Figure 5‑3       Construction Area for Access Road, Residential Site and Wetland Nature Reserve 5-21

Figure 6‑1       The Assessment Area of the Water Quality Impact Assessment 6-26

Figure 6‑2       Existing Water Systems and Respective Catchments 6-27

Figure 6‑3       Locations of EPD’s Water Quality Monitoring Stations in Deep Bay 6-28

Figure 6‑4       Locations of EPD’s Marine Sediment Quality Monitoring Stations in Deep Bay 6-29

Figure 6‑5       Locations and WQI of EPD’s River Water Quality Monitoring Stations at Yuen Long Creek and Kam Tin River 6-30

Figure 6‑6       Locations of Sampling Ponds for Fishpond Water Quality 6-31

Figure 6‑7       Locations of Sampling Ponds for Fishpond Sediment Quality 6-32

Figure 6‑8       Sampling Locations for River Water Quality 6-33

Figure 6‑9       21 Larger Ponds will be Consolidated in the WNR_ 6-34

Figure 6‑10     Details of Marsh Structure 6-35

Figure 6‑11      Drainage Channel X and Y for Water Discharge in the WNR_ 6-36

Figure 6‑12     Daily Variation of Rainfall from 1989 to 1998_ 6-37

Figure 6‑13     Discharge Volume from Water Ponds within the Site from 1989 to 1998_ 6-38

Figure 7‑1       Locations of Sediment Sampling Ponds for Biogas Investigation_ 7-9

Figure 8‑1       Existing Sewerage Systems near the Subject Site 8-9

Figure 8‑2       The YLSTW Effluent Pipelines and its Alternative of the YLKTSSD Stage 2_ 8-10

Figure 8‑3       The Sub-catchment of Sewerage Network under Tin Wah Road_ 8-11

Figure 8‑4       Proposed Sewerage Options 8-12

Figure 8‑5       Total Flow to Yuen Long STW from 2000 to 2016_ 8-13

Figure 10‑1     Location of the Study Area in Hong Kong_ 10-13

Figure 10‑2     Aerial View of Study Area 1949 (GEO Ref.# YO2388) 10-14

Figure 10‑3     Aerial View of Study Area 1963 (GEO Ref.# YO9690 ) 10-15

Figure 10‑4     Aerial View of Study Area 2000 (GEO Ref.# CN26484 ) 10-16

Figure 10‑5     Photographs Illustrating Examples of Structures in the Study Area_ 10-17

Figure 10‑6     Map Showing the Locations of Historical Structures in Shing Uk Tsuen_ 10-18

Figure 10‑7     Map Showing the Locations of the Historical Structures in Tai Tseng Wai 10-19

Figure 10‑8a   Map Showing the Locations of the Historical Structures in Ng Uk Tsuen_ 10-20

Figure 10‑8b   Map Showing the Locatios of the Tin Hau Temple near Ng Uk Tsuen_ 10-21

Figure 10‑9     Map Showing the Locations of Graves and Fung Shui Wood_ 10-22

Figure 10‑10   Aerial View of the Study Area 1924 (GEO Ref.# Y00159) 10-23

Figure 10‑11    Map showing the Evolution of the Bunds (1927-2000) and Locations of Existing Bunds Still Following the Original Alignment 10-24

Figure 10‑12   Photographs illustrating the Study Area: (A) Example of road hardening; (B) View of the bunds; (C) View of a sluice gate 10-25

Figure 11‑1A   Alternative Building Height Profiles 11-95

Figure 11‑1B   Alternative Block Plans – Option 1A_ 11-96

Figure 11‑1C   Alternative Block Plans – Option 1B_ 11-97

Figure 11‑1D   Alternative Block Plans – Option 1C_ 11-98

Figure 11‑2      Landscape Resources 11-99

Figure 11‑3      Preliminary Tree Survey Plan_ 11-100

Figure 11‑4      Landscape CharacterAreas 11-101

Figure 11‑5A   Landscape Character Area Photograph_ 11-102

Figure 11‑5B   Landscape Character Area Photograph_ 11-103

Figure 11‑6      Visual Envelope and Zone of Visual Influence 11-104

Figure 11‑7      Visual Characteristics of the Study Area_ 11-105

Figure 11‑8      Review of Planning and Development Control Framework_ 11-106

Figure 11‑9      Impacts on Landscape Resources Option 1A and 1B_ 11-107

Figure 11‑10A Visual Impacts for Option 1A_ 11-108

Figure 11‑10B Visual Impacts for Option 1B_ 11-109

Figure 11‑11A  Design Concept Drawing and Recommended Landscape Mitigation Measures for Option 1A  11-110

Figure 11‑11B  Landscape Master Plan for Option 1A_ 11-111

Figure 11‑12A Design Concept Drawing and Recommended Landscape Mitigation Measures for Option 1B  11-112

Figure 11‑12B Landscape Master Plan for Option 1A_ 11-113

Figure 11‑13A Section A-A’ for Option 1A_ 11-114

Figure 11‑13B Section B-B’ for Option 1A_ 11-115

Figure 11‑13C Section A-A’ for Option 1B_ 11-116

Figure 11‑13D Section B-B’ for Option 1B_ 11-117

Figure 11‑14A Photomontages Vantage Point A – Option 1A_ 11-118

Figure 11‑14B Photomontages Vantage Point A – Option 1A_ 11-119

Figure 11‑14C Photomontages Vantage Point B – Option 1A_ 11-120

Figure 11‑14D Photomontages Vantage Point B – Option 1A_ 11-121

Figure 11‑14E Photomontages Vantage Point C – Option 1A_ 11-122

Figure 11‑14F Photomontages Vantage Point C – Option 1A_ 11-123

Figure 11‑14G Photomontages Vantage Point D – Option 1A_ 11-124

Figure 11‑14H Photomontages Vantage Point D – Option 1A_ 11-125

Figure 11‑14I  Photomontages Vantage Point E – Option 1A_ 11-126

Figure 11‑14J  Photomontages Vantage Point E – Option 1A_ 11-127

Figure 11‑14K Photomontages Vantage Point F – Option 1A_ 11-128

Figure 11‑14L  Photomontages Vantage Point F – Option 1A_ 11-129

Figure 11‑14MPhotomontages Vantage Point G – Option 1A_ 11-130

Figure 11‑14N Photomontages Vantage Point G – Option 1A_ 11-131

Figure 11‑14O Photomontages Vantage Point H – Option 1A_ 11-132

Figure 11‑14P Photomontages Vantage Point H – Option 1A_ 11-133

Figure 11‑15A Photomontages Vantage Point A – Option 1B_ 11-134

Figure 11‑15B Photomontages Vantage Point A – Option 1B_ 11-135

Figure 11‑15C Photomontages Vantage Point B – Option 1B_ 11-136

Figure 11‑15D Photomontages Vantage Point B – Option 1B_ 11-137

Figure 11‑15E Photomontages Vantage Point C – Option 1B_ 11-138

Figure 11‑15F Photomontages Vantage Point C – Option 1B_ 11-139

Figure 11‑15G Photomontages Vantage Point D – Option 1B_ 11-140

Figure 11‑15H Photomontages Vantage Point D – Option 1B_ 11-141

Figure 11‑15I  Photomontages Vantage Point E – Option 1B_ 11-142

Figure 11‑15J  Photomontages Vantage Point E – Option 1B_ 11-143

Figure 11‑15K Photomontages Vantage Point F – Option 1B_ 11-144

Figure 11‑15L  Photomontages Vantage Point F – Option 1B_ 11-145

Figure 11‑15MPhotomontages Vantage Point G – Option 1B_ 11-146

Figure 11‑15N Photomontages Vantage Point G – Option 1B_ 11-147

Figure 11‑15O Photomontages Vantage Point H – Option 1B_ 11-148

Figure 11‑15P Photomontages Vantage Point H – Option 1B_ 11-149

Figure 12‑1     Location and Layout of the Assessment Area_ 12-18

Figure 12‑2     Sequence of Pond Enhancement Works 12-19

Figure 13‑1     Site Outline and Extent of Ecological Assessment Areas 13-92

Figure 13‑2     Location of Ecologically Sensitive Receivers near the Fung Lok Wai Site 13-93

Figure 13‑3     Vegetation Survey Quadrat Locations 13-94

Figure 13‑4     Aquatic Invertebrate Sampling Locations 13-95

Figure 13‑5     Insect and Herpetofauna Transect Routes 13-96

Figure 13‑6     Freshwater Fish Survey Locations 13-97

Figure 13‑7     Bird Survey Transect Locations 13-98

Figure 13‑8     Location of Current Egretry and Flightline Survey Observers 13-99

Figure 13‑9     Distribution of Habitat Types within the Study Area_ 13-100

Figure 13‑10   Flight line Survey Results for the Entire Study Site at Fung Lok Wai 13-101

Figure 13‑11    Flight Lines Associated with the Fung Lok Wai Egretry 13-102

Figure 13‑12   Location of Disturbance Exclusion and Reduced Density Buffers for Waterbird Species of Conservation Importance during Construction and Operation Phases 13-103

Figure 13‑13   Habitat Enhancement Work Programme for The Fung Lok Wai WNR_ 13-104

Figure 14‑1     Location of the Fung Lok Wai Wetland Nature Reserve 14-45

Figure 14‑2     Average Monthly Rainfall, Evaporation and Deficits at Fung Lok Wai. 14-46

Figure 14‑3     Existing Water Systems and Respective Catchments 14-47

Figure 14‑4     Broad Layout of the Wetland Nature Reserve 14-48

Figure 14‑5     Details of Habitat Layout within the Wetland Nature Reserve 14-49

Figure 14‑6     Developments Associated with the Construction of the Wetland Nature Reserve 14-50

Figure 14‑7     Location of Aquaculture Pond Habitat Features and Water Control Structures 14-51

Figure 14‑8     Details of Marsh Habitats and Infrastructure 14-52

Figure 14‑9     Habitats within the Constructed Marsh Area_ 14-53

Figure 14‑10   Status of Storage Pond under Normal and Extreme Rainfall Scenarios 14-54

Figure 14‑11    Management Compartments for the Mai Po and Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site 14-55

Figure 14‑12   Proposed Layout of Footpaths 14-56

Figure 14‑13   Pond Enhancement Sectors 14-57

Figure 14‑14   Definition of Operating Water Levels for Ponds 14-58

 


LIST OF TABLES

 

Table 2‑1         Basic Parameters of the Proposed Residential Development 2-7

Table 2‑2         Habitat Enhancement Work Programme For The Fung Lok Wai WNR_ 2-12

Table 3‑1         Comparison of the Two Access Options 3-3

Table 4‑1         Hong Kong Air Quality Objectives 4-1

Table 4‑2         Annual Average Concentrations of NO2 and RSP measured at EPD’s Air Quality Monitoring Station in Yuen Long from 2002 to 2006_ 4-2

Table 4‑3         Representative ASRs for the Dust Emission Impact Assessment 4-4

Table 4‑4         Predicted Unmitigated TSP Level at selected ASRs 4-5

Table 4‑5         Predicted mitigated TSP Level at selected ASRs 4-7

Table 5‑1         Noise Limits for Daytime Construction Activities 5-3

Table 5‑2         Key Construction Activities for Construction Noise Impact Assessment 5-4

Table 5‑3         Representative Assessment Phases studied in the Construction Noise Impact Assessment 5-5

Table 5‑4         RAPs Selected for Construction Noise Impact Assessment 5-7

Table 5‑5         Unmitigated Noise Levels Predicted At CN 1_ 5-7

Table 5‑6         Unmitigated Noise Levels Predicted At CN 2_ 5-8

Table 5‑7         Unmitigated Noise Levels Predicted At CN 3_ 5-8

Table 5‑8         Unmitigated Noise Levels Predicted At CN 4_ 5-9

Table 5‑9         Unmitigated Noise Levels Predicted At CN 5_ 5-9

Table 5‑10       Mitigated Noise Levels at CN1 with Silenced PME_ 5-10

Table 5‑11       Mitigated Noise Levels at CN2 with Silenced PME_ 5-11

Table 5‑12       Mitigated Noise Levels at CN3 with Silenced PME_ 5-11

Table 5‑13       Mitigated Noise Levels at CN4 with Silenced PME_ 5-12

Table 5‑14       Mitigated Noise Levels at CN5 with Silenced PME_ 5-12

Table 5‑15       Mitigated Noise Levels at CN1 with Silenced PME + Temporary Noise Barriers + Machinery Enclosure  5-14

Table 5‑16       Mitigated Noise Levels at CN2 with Silenced PME + Temporary Noise Barriers + Machinery Enclosure  5-14

Table 5‑17       Area Sensitivity Ratings of NSRs 5-17

Table 6‑1         Summary Statistics of Marine Water Quality of Deep Bay WCZ in 2005 (Inner Deep Bay) 6-4

Table 6‑2         Summary Statistics of Marine Bottom Sediment Quality of Deep Bay WCZ, 2001 -2005_ 6-5

Table 6‑3         Summary of River Water Quality Monitoring results for Yuen Long Creek, Kam Tin River and Tin Shui Wai Nullah in 2005_ 6-7

Table 6‑4         Results Of Water Quality Monitoring In Fishponds At Fung Lok Wai (1995) 6-9

Table 6‑5         Results of Fishpond/ River Water Quality Survey at Fung Lok Wai 6-10

Table 6‑6         Results of Fishpond Sediment Quality Survey at Fung Lok Wai 6-10

Table 6‑7         Estimated Runoff After Development 6-15

Table 6‑8         Estimated Peak Rate of Runoff After Development 6-15

Table 6‑9         Water Quality Objectives for Deep Bay WCZ_ 6-18

Table 6‑10       Classification of Sediment 6-18

Table 6‑11       Sediment Quality Criteria for the Classification of Sediment 6-19

Table 6‑12       Summary of Annual Evaporation and Rainfall (1989 to 1998) 6-20

Table 7‑1         Sampling Locations and Levels of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Sediment Oxygen Demand (SOD) 7-1

Table 7‑2         Calculation of Methane Flux from the Fung Lok Wai Development 7-5

Table 8‑1         Development Schedule the Project 8-2

Table 8‑2         Required Upgrading of the Sewerage Network Leading to the TWR pumping Station_ 8-5

Table 9‑1         Sumamry Table of Estimate Quantity of Materials to be Generated or Imported during the Construction of the Fung Lok Wai Project 9-4

Table 10‑1       The impacts associated with cultural heritage resources outside the Study Area_ 10-8

Table 10‑2       Mitigation Recommendations for Cultural Heritage Resources Outside the Study Area_ 10-9

Table 11‑1       Degree of Impact 11-5

Table 11‑2       Residual Impact Significance Threshold Matrix 11-6

Table 11‑3       Alternative Schemes Comparison_ 11-10

Table 11‑4       Review of Existing Planning and Development Control Framework_ 11-17

Table 11‑5       Existing Landscape Resources and Predicted Impacts – Options 1A and 1B_ 11-25

Table 11‑6       Existing Landscape Character and Predicted Impacts – Options 1A and 1B_ 11-37

Table 11‑7A     Visually Sensitive Receivers and Predicted Impacts – Option 1A_ 11-48

Table 11‑7B     Visually Sensitive Receivers and Predicted Impacts – Option 1B_ 11-63

Table 11‑8       Proposed Construction Phase Mitigation Measures 11-67

Table 11‑9       Proposed Operational Phase Mitigation Measures 11-68

Table 11‑10     Provisional Programme for Landscape Works 11-72

Table 11‑11      Landscape and Visual Mitigation Measures Implementation Schedules 11-73

Table 12‑1       Results of Fishpond/ River Water Quality Survey at Fung Lok Wai 12-4

Table 12‑2       Area of Ponds and Inland Fresh Fish Production In Hong Kong. Source AFCD Annual Reports, 2002  12-5

Table 12‑3       Optimum Water Quality Objectives for Initiating Fish Rearing_ 12-6

Table 12‑4       Summary Of Fish Species Typical Of Polyculture Practice In The Deep Bay Area And Examples Of The Sources Of Stock_ 12-7

Table 12‑5       Production Time And Acceptable Market Size Of Species Of Fish Raised In Aquaculture Ponds  12-7

Table 12‑6       Extent of Habitats Identified Within the Fung Lok Wai Assessment Area_ 12-8

Table 12‑7       Wholesale price range per kg of freshwater fish during the period January – December 2001. Source: AFCD, fax 11/9/02_ 12-11

Table 12‑8       Schedule for pond enhancement works. Bund numbers are illustrated in Figure 12‑2_ 12-12

Table 12‑9       Summary of importance of the fisheries resources within the Fung Lok Wai Assessment Area and evaluation of predicted impacts 12-14

Table 13‑1       Results of Water Quality Monitoring in Fishponds at Fung Lok Wai (May 2002) 13-5

Table 13‑2       Survey Time Segments for Bird Flight Line Surveys 13-17

Table 13‑3       Target Species for Flightline Surveys and Their Species Codes used on Recording Sheets  13-18

Table 13‑4       Altitude Categories Adopted to Record the Bird Flight Line Data_ 13-18

Table 13‑5       Extent of Habitat Types within the Assessment Area (ha.) 13-20

Table 13‑6       Ecological Evaluation Of Intertidal Forested Wetlands 13-21

Table 13‑7       Ecological Evaluation of Permanent Rivers, Streams and Creeks 13-22

Table 13‑8       Ecological Evaluation of Ditches and Drainage Channels 13-22

Table 13‑9       Ecological Evaluation of Aquaculture Ponds 13-23

Table 13‑10     Ecological Evaluation of Reedbed_ 13-24

Table 13‑11     Ecological Evaluation of Permanent Freshwater Marsh and Pools 13-24

Table 13‑12     Ecological Evaluation of Seasonally Flooded (wet) Agricultural Land_ 13-25

Table 13‑13     Ecological Evaluation of Dry Agricultural Land_ 13-25

Table 13‑14     Ecological Evaluation of Inactive Agricultural Land_ 13-25

Table 13‑15     Ecological Evaluation of Orchards 13-26

Table 13‑16     Ecological Evaluation of Fung Shui Woodland_ 13-26

Table 13‑17     Ecological Evaluation of Semi-natural Secondary Woodland_ 13-27

Table 13‑18     Ecological Evaluation of Plantation Woodland_ 13-27

Table 13‑19     Ecological Evaluation of Grassland_ 13-28

Table 13‑20     Ecological Evaluation of Grassland-Shrubland Mosaic 13-28

Table 13‑21     Ecological Evaluation of Landscaped Area_ 13-28

Table 13‑22     Ecological Evaluation of Wasteland Habitats 13-29

Table 13‑23     Ecological Evaluation of Recreated Wetland_ 13-29

Table 13‑24     Ecological Evaluation of Developed Areas 13-30

Table 13‑25     Summary of habitat evaluations in order of ecological value. 13-31

Table 13‑26     Plant Species of Potential Conservation Interest Recorded within the Assessment Area_ 13-32

Table 13‑27     Reptile Species of Some Conservation Value, Their Habitat Preferences and Observed Relative abundance within the Assessment Area at Fung Lok Wai 13-35

Table 13‑28     Bird Species of Conservation Importance Recorded in Significant Numbers within the Assessment Area of Fung Lok Wai 13-37

Table 13‑29     List of Bird Species of Conservation Importance Recorded in Each Section of the Assessment Area at Fung Lok Wai. 13-40

Table 13‑30     Abundance and Proportion of Birds Observed Within the Study Site by Altitude Category (February-December 2001) 13-41

Table 13‑31     Dominant Species by Altitude Category 13-41

Table 13‑32     Comparison of Total Individuals for Each Altitude Category within the Study Site and the Proposed Development Area_ 13-41

Table 13‑33     Abundance and Proportion of Birds Observed within the Proposed Development Area by Altitude Category (February-December 2001) 13-42

Table 13‑34     Dominant Species Recorded at Each Altitude Category within the Proposed Development Area  13-42

Table 13‑35     Comparison of Potential Affect on Egretry Flightlines of Alternative Development Scenarios  13-46

Table 13‑36     Summary Matrix of Potential Impacts on Various Types of Habitats 13-49

Table 13‑37     Summary of Impacts to Aquaculture Ponds from Habitat Loss 13-50

Table 13‑38     Summary of Impacts to Ditches and Drainage Channel from Habitat Loss 13-51

Table 13‑39     Summary of Impacts to Wetland Mosaic Habitats (Including Wet Agriculture, Reedbed, and Freshwater Marsh) from Habitat Fragmentation_ 13-51

Table 13‑40     Summary of Impacts to Fung-shui Woodland from Habitat Fragmentation_ 13-52

Table 13‑41     Summary of Impacts to Aquaculture Ponds from Disturbance 13-53

Table 13‑42     Summary of Impacts to Fung Shui Woodland (Including Egretry) from Disturbance 13-53

Table 13‑43     Summary of Impacts to Intertidal Forested Wetland from Disturbance 13-54

Table 13‑44     Summary of Impacts to Wetland Mosaic Habitats (including Wet Agriculture, Reedbed, and Freshwater Marsh) from Disturbance 13-54

Table 13‑45     Summary of Impacts to Dry/Inactive Agricultural Land from Disturbance 13-54

Table 13‑46     Summary of impacts to Semi-natural Secondary Woodland from Disturbance 13-54

Table 13‑47     Summary of Impacts to Aquaculture Ponds from Pollution_ 13-55

Table 13‑48     Summary of Impacts to Fung-shui Woodland (including Egretry) from Pollution_ 13-56

Table 13‑49     Summary of Impacts to Intertidal Forested Wetland from Pollution_ 13-56

Table 13‑50     Summary of Impacts Wetland Mosaic Habitats (including Wet Agriculture, Reedbed, and Freshwater Marsh) from Pollution_ 13-56

Table 13‑51     Summary of Impacts to Dry/Inactive Agricultural Land from Pollution_ 13-57

Table 13‑52     Summary of Impacts to Semi-natural Secondary Woodland from Pollution_ 13-57

Table 13‑53     Summary of Impacts to Aquaculture Ponds from Soil Compaction_ 13-57

Table 13‑54     Summary of Impacts to Ditches and Drainage Channels from Hydrological Disruption_ 13-58

Table 13‑55     Predicted Disturbance Impacts from the Construction and Operation of the Residential Development on Regularly Occurring Species of Conservation Importance at Fung Lok Wai 13-62

Table 13‑56     Habitat Loss During the Construction Phase on Regularly Occurring Species of Conservation Importance at Fung Lok Wai 13-63

Table 13‑57     Habitat Loss during the Operation Phase on Regularly Occurring Species of Conservation Importance at Fung Lok Wai 13-65

Table 13‑58     Significance of impacts on Species of Conservation Importance at Fung Lok Wai 13-68

Table 13‑59     Observed maximum, mean (counts and densities) of wetland bird species using the wetland in the Study Site and Assessment Area during 2001_ 13-72

Table 13‑60     Extent and proportion of direct and indirect (due to disturbance) habitat loss during construction for sensitive wetland bird species. 13-73

Table 13‑61     Mitigation targets for key wetland bird species of conservation importance within remaining wetland areas of the Study Site required to fully compensate for habitat loss and disturbance impacts during construction_ 13-74

Table 13‑62     Extent and proportion of direct and indirect (due to disturbance) habitat loss during operation for wetland bird species 13-77

Table 13‑63     Mitigation targets for wetland bird species of conservation importance within remaining wetland areas of the Study Site required to fully compensate for habitat loss and disturbance impacts during operation  13-78

Table 13‑64     Mitigation Targets for Enhanced Aquaculture Ponds 13-79

Table 13‑65     Mitigation Targets for Marsh Habitat 13-80

Table 13‑66     Bird SpeciesExpected to Use the Marsh Habitat 13-80

Table 13‑67     The Overall Levels Of Compensation Predicted From Compensation Measures For Species Of Conservation Importance That Were Recorded During The Baseline Surveys At Fung Lok Wai 13-84

Table 13‑68     Proposed Mitigation Measures and Predicted Residual Impacts 13-86

Table 13‑69     Mitigation targets for Key Bird Species and other Species of Conservation Importance 13-87

Table 14‑1       Ecological evaluation of habitats within the Fung Lok Wai Assessment Area_ 14-4

Table 14‑2       Species of Conservation Importance that occur within the Fung Lok Wai Assessment Area  14-5

Table 14‑3       Summary matrix of potential impacts on habitats 14-7

Table 14‑4       Potential physical constraints on the creation of a Wetland Nature Reserve at Fung Lok Wai. 14-7

Table 14‑5       Mitigation targets for enhanced fishponds 14-12

Table 14‑6       Mitigation targets for Marsh Habitat 14-13

Table 14‑7       Mitigation targets for Species of Conservation Importance associated with fishpond habitats  14-13

Table 14‑8       Species Expected to Use the Marsh Habitat 14-14

Table 14‑9       The area of habitats in the proposed WNR_ 14-15

Table 14‑10     Pond enhancement schedule. 14-18

Table 14‑11     Wetland species to be established in the aquaculture pond mitigation area_ 14-19

Table 14‑12     Species to be established in the Marsh Habitat area_ 14-24

Table 14‑13     Long-term pond management (5 year cycle) 14-32

Table 14‑14     General management actions for the Fung Lok Wai WNR_ 14-33

Table 14‑15     Ecological monitoring programme for Fung Lok Wai WNR_ 14-36

Table 14‑16     Key Action Levels and Limits and their associated management actions 14-40

 


1.                  Introduction

1.1              Background

1.1.1          The Project Proponent - Mutual Luck Investment Limited (MLI), proposes to develop a residential development and a Wetland Nature Reserve (“WNR”) (hereinafter collectively called the “Project”) at existing fishponds at Lot 1457 R.P., D.D. 123 Fung Lok Wai, (the Subject Site). The Project comprises the following main components: -

·        About 4 ha of residential land for 148,000m2 GFA residential development and a club house for residents;

·        About 76 ha of enhanced and managed WNR, including a potential alternative egretry.

1.1.2          The entire development will be about 80 ha in size. The about 4 ha of residential land will be formed by filling fishponds at the southern part of the site, whilst the WNR will be established to its immediate north. The Project complies with the “no-net-loss in wetland” principle stipulated in the notes of the Approved Lau Fau Shan and Tsim Bei Tsui OZP No. S/YL/-LFS/7.

1.1.3          This is achieved through enlargement of existing fishponds by removal of part of the dividing bunds. The Project is scheduled to be completed and with population intake in third quarter of 2016.

1.1.4          The Subject Site abuts the Inner Deep Bay and lies within the Wetland Conservation Area.  About 43 ha of the Site has been designated as a Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site since September 1995. The Site is close to the Hong Kong Wetland Park (HKWP), with Mai Po area to its northeast and Yuen Long Industrial Estate (YLIE) to southeast.

1.1.5          The existing Fuk Shun Street at the southern side of the Subject Site will be used as the access road of the Project. The location of the Project, the site boundary and the proposed access road are shown as Figure 1‑1

1.1.6          This Project is a Designated Project according to Item P of Part I, Schedule 2 of the EIA Ordinance, since it is a residential development other than New Territories exempted house within the Deep Bay Buffer Zone 1 and 2.

1.1.7          MLI submitted an application (No. ESB-055/2000) for an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Study Brief under section 5(1)(a) of the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance (EIAO) on 26 May 2000 with a project profile (No. PP-091/2000).

1.1.8          A Study Brief [No. ESB-055/2000] was issued by the Authority to the MLI under Section 5(7)(a) of the EIAO in July 2000 for preparation of the EIA report.  A copy of the Study Brief is given in Appendix 1-1 for reference.

1.1.9          CH2M HILL Hong Kong Limited, formerly traded as CH2M-IDC Hong Kong Limited, has been commissioned by the MLI on 16 November 2000 as the lead consultant to carry out this EIA in associated with RPS, Asia Ecological Consultant, ADI Ltd., Archaeological Assessments and MVA Hong Kong Limited.

1.1.10      This EIA report is prepared in accordance with the requirements stated in the Study Brief and the relevant criteria and guidelines as stated in various Annexes of the EIA TM.

 

1.2              Historical Land Use of the Site

1.2.1          The earliest useful map indicated that the area of Fung Lok Wai was swamp and marsh in the early 1900’s. The area was then reclaimed for brackish water rice cultivation.  During the period between 1938 and 1945, the Deep Bay area was transformed into gei wais.  By 1974, the area was converted to deep water fish ponds as fish farming was then a profitable business.  These fish ponds remain up to the present, however many of them have been abandoned as a result of severe competition from the cheap fish imports from mainland China.

 

1.3              Ecological Importance of Fish Ponds

1.3.1          Fresh water fish farming was once an important agricultural activity in Deep Bay area supporting the livelihoods of many local people.  These fish ponds, it so happened, also served as an extensive area of wetland habitat that are of ecological importance to birds, in particular to migratory birds on their migratory path as a refuelling station.

1.3.2          The Fish Pond Study identified that the traditional aquaculture management practices adopted in the fish ponds within Deep Bay were of particular ecological value to wetland birds when the ponds were drained at harvest time.  These water birds feed on trash fish that are of no commercial value and which are bi-product of traditional aquaculture management practices.

1.3.3          However, with the continual decline of the fish farming industry in Hong Kong throughout the past decades, many of the fish ponds in Deep Bay area are abandoned.  With the absence of active management, the ecological value of fish ponds to birds will be lost.  Therefore, there is an imminent need to conserve these fish ponds together with the traditional aquaculture management practices in order to conserve the ecological value of this important wetland habitat in Deep Bay.

 

1.4              Project Objective

1.4.1          The objective of the Project is to develop a sustainable model for the conservation of the existing fish ponds together with the traditional aquaculture management practices with value creation stemming from the development of a residential complex.

1.4.2          Three major principles are proposed to be upheld in the design of the Project:

·        No net loss of wetland;

·        Sustainability;

·        Wise use of the wetland.

1.4.3          These principles are embedded in the physical design of the Project and the proposed operation of the Wetland Nature Reserve:

No net loss of wetland

1.4.4          The Project will comply with the “no-net-loss in wetland” principle as stipulated in the notes of the Approved Lau Fau Shan and Tsim Bei Tsui OZP No. S/YL/LFS/7.  The fishponds will be re-profiled and enlarged through removal of some pond bunds to result in a habitat more suitable and sympathetic to wetland birds.  A corollary in doing so (enlargement and removal of pond bunds) also resulted in complying with the “no net loss in wetland” principle as there will be a slight overall increase in water body area.  The residential development site will be restricted to occupy only 5% of the Site at the southern edge. 

Sustainability

1.4.5          The enhanced fish ponds and habitats created will form a dedicated Wetland Nature Reserve.  The Proponent will be responsible for the creation, enhancement and management of the Wetland Nature Reserve during the construction phase and shall provide an undertaking to take sole responsibility for management until a successor, such as an independent Foundation, is identified to the satisfaction of EPD or its agent.

Wise use of wetland

1.4.6          The long-term management of the fish ponds in the Wetland Nature Reserve ensures the preservation of the cultural practice of aquaculture in-situ, which is consistent with concepts of “wise use” fore-shadowed in Article 3.1 of the Ramsar Convention. It also provides opportunities for ongoing research into sustainable fish production and wildlife conservation.

 

1.5              Objectives of the EIA Study

1.5.1          The main objective of this EIA study is to provide information on the nature and extent of environmental impacts arising from the construction and operation of the proposed designated projects and related activities taking place concurrently. The study will provide information for DEP’s decisions on:

·        Overall acceptability of any adverse environmental consequences that are likely to arise as a result of the proposed project;

·        Conditions and requirements for the detailed design, construction and operation of the proposed project to mitigate against adverse environmental consequences wherever practicable; and

·        Acceptability of residual impacts after the proposed mitigation measures are implemented.

1.5.2          The objectives of this EIA study, as stated in Section 2.1 of the Study Brief, are as follows:

·        To describe the proposed project and associated works together with the requirements for carrying out the proposed project;

·        To identify and describe the elements of the community and environment likely to be affected by the proposed project and/or likely to cause adverse impacts to the proposed project, including both the natural and man-made environment;

·        To identify and quantify all environmental sensitive receivers, emission sources and determine the significance of impacts on sensitive receivers and potential affected uses;

·        To identify and quantify any potential losses or damage to flora, fauna and wildlife habitats;

·        To identify any negative impacts on sites of cultural heritage and to propose measures to mitigate these impacts;

·        To identify and quantify any potential landscape and visual impacts and to proposed measures to mitigate these impacts;

·        To propose the provision of infrastructure or mitigation measures so as to minimize pollution, environmental disturbance and nuisance during construction and operation of the project;

·        To identify, predict and evaluate the residual (i.e. after practicable mitigation) environmental impacts and the cumulative effects expected to arise during the construction and operation phases of the project in relation to the sensitive receivers and potential affected uses;

·        To identify, assess and specify methods, measures and standards, to be included in the detailed design, construction and operation of the project which are necessary to mitigate these environmental impacts and reducing them to acceptable levels;

·        To investigate the extent of side-effects of proposed mitigation measures that may lead to other forms of impacts;

·        To identify constraints associated with the mitigation measures recommended in the EIA study;

·        To identify, within the study area, any individual project(s) that fall under Schedule 2 and/or Schedule 3 of the EIA Ordinance; to ascertain whether the findings of this EIA study have adequately addressed the environmental impacts of those projects; and where necessary, to identify the outstanding issues that need to be addressed in any further detailed EIA study; and

·        To design and specify the environmental monitoring and audit requirements, if required, to ensure the implementation and the effectiveness of the environmental protection and pollution and pollution control measures adopted.

 

1.6              Scope of the EIA

1.6.1          Clause 3.2 of the Study Brief sets out the scope of the EIA study for the Project and associated works. The EIA study covers the combined impacts of all the proposed developments and the cumulative impacts of the existing, committed and planned developments in the vicinity of the Project including the Hong Kong Wetland Park, Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site etc., in accordance with the requirements laid down in Section 3.4 of the TM. The environmental impacts of on-site and off-site works and facilities associated with the proposed developments shall be addressed. The EIA study shall address the likely key issues described below, together with any issues identified during the course of the EIA study:

·        Noise impacts arising from construction and operation of the development to the nearby village areas;

·        Dust impacts arising from construction of the development to the nearby villages;

·        Landscape and visual impacts during construction and operation of the development;

·        Water quality impacts during construction and operation, including pond draining and filling, sewage collection, treatment and disposal systems, surface runoff and land drainage and stormwater system;

·        Potential impacts on historical buildings/architectures and monuments;

·        Wetland loss and impacts to the adjacent fishponds, Hong Kong Wetland Park, Recognized Sites of Conservation Importance including Wetland Conservation Area, Wetland Buffer Area and Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site due to the construction and operation of the proposed development;

·        Terrestrial and aquatic ecological impacts to the adjacent area with conservation importance and ecologically sensitive areas including the Hong Kong Wetland Park, Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar site with particular attention to possible fragmentation of the wetland, ecological link between Deep Bay area and the project area, the future buildings on the site to the bird’s flight line with special attention to the ambient light at night-time and the little woodland to the north of Fung Lok Wai;

·        Fisheries impacts during construction and operation of the development;

·        Collection and disposal of potentially contaminated dredged spoil arising from the project; and

·        Proposals for the short term and long term management of the proposed Wetland Nature Reserve with the project area including trust and financial arrangement.


1.7              Structure of the EIA

1.7.1          The structure of this EIA is as follows:

Volume 1

Section 1          Introduction

Section 2          Project Description

Section 3          Consideration of Alternative Schemes

Section 4          Air Quality Impact Assessment

Section 5          Noise Impact Assessment

Section 6          Water Quality Impact Assessment

Section 7          Potential Problem of Biogas

Section 8          Sewerage and Sewage Treatment Implications

Section 9          Waste Management

Section 10        Cultural Heritage Impact Assessment

Section 11        Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment

 

Volume 2

Section 12        Fisheries Impact Assessment

Section 13        Ecological Impact Assessment

Section 14        The Habitat Creation and Management Plan of the Wetland Nature Reserve

Section 15        The Long-term Management of the Wetland Nature Reserve

Section 16        Environmental Monitoring and Audit Requirements

Section 17        Summary of Environmental Outcome and Overall Conclusion

 

2.                  Project description

2.1              The Proposed Development and the Environs

2.1.1          The Subject Site is located at Lot 1457 R.P. in D.D. 123, Fung Lok Wai, Yuen Long and is about 2 km north of the Yuen Long New Town. To the west of the subject site is the Hong Kong Wetland Park (HKWP), with Mai Po located to its northeast and Yuen Long Industrial Estate (YLIE) to southeast. The total site area is about 80.1 ha.  Figure 21 shows the proposed Project and its environs.

2.1.2          As per the latest Approved Lau Fau Shan & Tsim Bei Tsui Zoning Plan No. S/YL-LFS/7 gazetted on 1 February 2005, the Subject Site is zoned “Other Specified Uses (Comprehensive Development and Wetland Enhancement Area)”. Figure 2‑2 refers. Pertaining to the Approved Outline Zoning Plan of Tin Shui Wai Plan No. S/TSW/11 gazetted on 26 October 2007, the planned zoning areas in the Tin Shui Wai Reserve Zone are also presented in the same figure.

2.1.3          The Subject Site abuts the Inner Deep Bay and lies within the Wetland Conservation Area. About 43 ha of the Site has been designated as a Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site since September 1995.

The Residential Development

2.1.4          The proposed residential development has the following basic parameters as tabulated below.

Table 21          Basic Parameters of the Proposed Residential Development

Total Site Area (approximate)

80.1 ha

Area of residential development (approximate)

4 ha

Area of wetland nature reserve (approximate)

76.1 ha

Proposed Plot Ratio

0.185

Proposed Residential GFA

148,000 m2

Design Population

8,490

No. of Flats

Not more than. 2,860 units

 

2.1.5          The about 4 ha residential site will be formed by filling the fishponds at the southern part of the Subject Site with a WNR to be established to its north. Vehicular access to the Project will be via the existing Fuk Shun Street. The whole residential site lies outside the Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site.

2.1.6          Figure 2‑3 presents a tentative master layout plan of the proposed residential development.

The Access Road

2.1.7          The proposed vehicular access of the site, viz. the Southern Development Access, will be via the existing Fuk Shun Street and Yuen Long Industrial Estate to Yuen Long. Fuk Shun Street is currently a substandard road. The project proponent is proposing to upgrade this sub-standard Fuk Shun Street to a standard of not less than 7.3 m single 2-lane public road with not less than 2m wide footpath on both sides of the road.

2.1.8          The EIA Study Brief stipulates in general an assessment area of 300m and 500m from the boundary of the project site including the access road with respect to noise and air quality impact assessment respectively. Figure 2‑4 shows these boundaries.

The Wetland Nature Reserve

2.1.9          The WNR will be established on the remaining 95% (about 76.1 ha.) of the site unaffected by the residential development. The WNR lies within Wetland Conservation Area while approximately half of the WNR lies within the Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site. The northern boundary adjoins the Inner Deep Bay Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).

2.1.10      The goal of the WNR is to provide a permanent purpose-built nature reserve and compensate for any disturbances associated with the construction and operation of the residential development. The result will be no net loss in either area or function of wetland habitat.

2.1.11      No net loss in waterbodies area will be achieved through reconfiguration of fishponds to create fewer, larger but more suitable ponds for birds and the creation of a complex of freshwater marsh habitats. Increasing fishpond size has an additional benefit, as there is evidence that many wetland birds prefer larger, less enclosed water bodies to small ponds, which typify most aquaculture practices. The removal of some bunds is predicted to have low or negligible impact as their intrinsic ecological value is low. The complex of freshwater marsh habitats proposed will provide a range of additional habitats for birds and other flora and fauna, including dragonflies.

2.1.12      Functional enhancement will be achieved through enhancement of both the ponds and the approach to aquaculture management. The carrying capacity of fishponds is limited by the uniform design of ponds and management that is not specifically targeted at conservation. Modifications to both will significantly improve foraging opportunities for birds and other fauna. To ensure ongoing functional replacement, key ecological indicators, including birds, will be monitored to guide management of the reserve.

Outline Design of Wetland Nature Reserve

2.1.13      The proposed WNR will comprise two key elements (Figure 2‑5):

·        A large expanse of retained, but ecologically enhanced, fishponds; and,

·        An area of re-created ‘natural’ marshland.

2.1.14      Actively managed ponds in the Deep Bay area are currently full for most of the year and their use by birds is severely limited due to their relatively steep sides, deep water and their frequent lack of marginal vegetation. These characteristics also limit their use by other species and hence fishponds tend to have relatively low biodiversity compared to many wetland habitats.

2.1.15      The active management of fishponds for commercial purposes, however, creates a key by-product in the form of abundant “trash fish” – small, non-commercial fish and invertebrates.  When ponds are drained down during the winter months for harvesting, large concentrations of birds can be observed foraging in the shallow water for trash fish. As only a small proportion of fishponds are drained at any one time, and only for short periods, the spatial distribution of feeding birds is highly dynamic and variable as birds seek out ponds as they are drained. ‘Feeding bottlenecks’ may occur if there are insufficient ponds to support foraging bird populations.

2.1.16      Although much of the Assessment Area is composed of wetland habitats in the form of aquaculture ponds, poor water quality and unsympathetic pond design severely limit its value for most faunal groups. Furthermore, there is inadequate vegetation cover on the site to support breeding populations of most wetland birds.

2.1.17      The main objectives of enhancing fishponds are, therefore, to:

·        Increase the value of fishponds to herons and egrets outside harvesting periods (i.e. draw-down), by increasing food resources and food availability and by reducing disturbance effects. Enhancement of the value of fishponds to such birds outside harvest periods could reduce the potential for ‘feeding bottlenecks’ thereby possibly reducing the area of fishponds needed to support the population.

 

·        Increase their overall biodiversity value and suitability for other non-bird Species of Conservation Importance, such as some mammals (e.g. Eurasian Otter), amphibians and reptiles, whilst maintaining their current important functions for herons, egrets and other water birds.

2.1.18      The ponds will be enhanced through the following specific actions:

·        The size of the fishponds will be increased by re-profiling unwanted bunds.

·        Emergent vegetation will be allowed to develop.

·        Areas of shallow water and intermittently exposed muddy islands will be created.

2.1.19      The enhanced fishponds will be located away from the residential development area to minimise disturbance impacts. They will also be contiguous with the main area of fishponds in the WCA and Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar site as a whole. Maintaining a contiguous area for compensation, which is linked, with an existing area of recognized conservation importance is of significant ecological value.

2.1.20      The natural wetland area will consist of a marshland complex, including areas of shallow open mesotrophic water (i.e. of moderate nutrient status), with adjoining reed beds and other emergent vegetation, shallow margins, islands, irregular shorelines, and an area of seasonally inundated grazed marsh and pools. Such fresh water marshes are a scarce habitat in Hong Kong and would develop rich and abundant aquatic and emergent plant communities. This in turn may support rich invertebrate, amphibian and reptile communities.

2.1.21      There are three key features of this proposed layout:

·        The majority of the fishponds on site are maintained, including all those within the Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar site boundary. This avoids the loss or detrimental modification of any wetland area within the Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar site and maintains the large open contiguous block of fishpond habitat in the area.

·        The location of the proposed area for the re-creation of natural wetlands will maximise the potential for ecological links with the following complementary adjacent habitats:

o        Scrub and woodland habitats on the hillsides to the south of the site;

o        Inter-tidal mangrove habitats along the former Tai River outfall; and,

o        The wetland creation at Hong Kong Wetland Park (HKWP).

o        These habitats may provide sources for the natural spread and establishment of some plants and animals within the wetland area. In addition they will provide additional shelter, food or breeding sites for wetland species and ecological ‘corridors’, which may facilitate dispersal.

·        As the re-created wetland will contain abundant tall reed beds, as well as other tall wetland vegetation and scattered trees, this will serve as a buffer between the residential development and the fishponds. This will reduce disturbance of birds feeding within the fishponds.

 

2.2              Construction of the Project

Preliminary Construction Program

2.2.1          Figure 2‑7 shows the tentative construction programme of the Project. Construction activities are planned to commence in the 3rd quarter of 2010 for completion in the 3rd quarter of 2016. i.e. a total of 6 years. Assessments of potential construction phase environmental impacts have been carried out based on this assumed construction programme. While the actual construction programme may require adjustment during the detailed design stage, the relevant assessments as presented in this report will allow the identification of sufficient mitigation measures at an early planning stage. Implementation of sufficient environmental mitigation measures would be audited through an Environmental Monitoring and Audit (EM&A) Programme.

2.2.2          The construction programme consists of the following three main phases: -

·        First phase (3rd quarter of 2010 to 2nd quarter of 2013) - establishment of the WNR. Key construction activities to be carried out include:

o        Relocating water from Sector 1, Sector 2 and Sector 3 ponds at different phases;

o        Draining, removing bunds and installing water controls at Sector 1, Sector 2 and Sector 3 of the WNR at different phases;

o        Re-filling ponds at Sector 1, Sector 2 and Sector 3 of the WNR;

o        Selective felling and vegetation management at Sector 1, Sector 2 and Sector 3 of the WNR at different phases;

o        Land formation and water control structures construction of the Marshland area;

o        Habitat creation of the Marshland area;

o        Constructing facilities of the Marshland area, such as board walks, hides, toilets and shelters.

·        Second phase (2nd quarter of 2011 to 3rd quarter of 2016) - construction works for development area. Key construction activities to be carried out are listed below:

o        Site clearance for the construction works for development area;

o        Pond draining and dredging at built area;

o        Delivery of fill material by trucks to the site;

o        Spreading and compaction of fill material at built area;

o        Foundation and superstructure works for buildings;

o        Construction of sewage pump house;

o        Laying of drainage, sewerage and utilities;

o        Paving of internal access road.

·        Third phase (4th quarter of 2014 to 3rd quarter of 2016) – widening works of the access road leading to the Project site. Key construction activities include:

o        Site clearance and formation for the widening of the Access Road leading to the site;

o        Laying of drainage, sewerage and utilities;

o        Formation of road sub-base, levelling and compaction;

o        Road paving and installation of road furniture;

o        Construction of landscape works;

o        Soft landscape establishment works

2.2.3          The above activities are categorized and described below.

Establishment and Management of Wetland Nature Reserve

2.2.4          Except for the residential portion, the remaining fishponds at the site will be modified and converted into a WNR. The pond bunds will be re-profiled to provide shallow sloping and irregular margins to increase feeding opportunities and efficiency for herons, egrets, waders, rails and crakes etc.

2.2.5          Thirty-seven (approximately 61.7 ha) of the existing fish ponds will be modified and enhanced to increase their value for Species of Conservation Importance, particularly birds recorded regularly on the site.

2.2.6          Thirty-one out of these 37 ponds will be consolidated through bund removal to create 18 ponds with an average size of about 2.6 ha. These ponds will undergo a series of enhancement to improve their attractiveness to wildlife, particularly birds including:

·        Creation of shallows and muddy islands through re-distribution of bund material; and,

·        Cut back of vegetation.

2.2.7          The remaining six ponds will be consolidated into three and permanently set aside and planted, to varying degrees, with reeds (Phragmites australis) to provide attractive habitat for water birds, particularly duck and reed bed passerines. These ponds will be fed by rain water and their level allowed to fluctuate seasonally.

2.2.8          An area of approximately 14.4 ha adjacent to the development area will be converted into a complex of freshwater marsh habitats. This area will comprise:

·        Permanent marsh composed of a series of shallow inter-locking lakes with occasional deep areas and islands.

·        Seasonal marsh composed of vegetation that is inundated only during the wet season.

·        Storage pond. The water deficit usually experienced every dry season is a constraint on the design and management of marsh habitats. To ensure a supply of freshwater of suitable quality for the permanent marsh throughout the year an existing fishpond will be enlarged to provide storage. The optimum size of this storage has been established through modelling of typical and extreme rainfall patterns.

2.2.9          A potential alternative egretry will be constructed in a part of the WNR that is as remote as possible to minimise disturbance.

2.2.10      Water levels within the marsh complex will be managed according to broad habitat requirements – i.e. permanent or seasonal inundation. Within the permanently inundated marsh areas, levels will still be allowed to fluctuate (within bounds) to facilitate the periodic exposure of muddy areas.

2.2.11      The water supply to the natural wetland will be from direct rainfall supplemented by run-off from the residential development and catchments A and B (see Figure 2‑6). Run-off from the residential site and catchments A and B will enter the storage pond via a ditch running along the southern border of the development area. The natural wetland area will not flood surrounding land and residential developments. The lakes within the area will eventually discharge via Channel X or, during storm events, via Channel Y (see Figure 2‑6) into the Tai River outfall.

2.2.12      Figure 2‑5 illustrates the proposed design for the Fung Lok Wai WNR in the context of its surrounding. By adopting the design, there will be no net loss of but a slight increase in waterbodies area. Figure 2‑10 presents the areas of various habitats, both before and after the implementation of the ecological enhancement works.

2.2.13      In order to minimise disturbance, the intensity of the establishment works of WNR will be kept low, for site clearance works at fishponds where the proposed WNR lies, only a few ponds will be drained each time for dredging and filling, to ensure the ecological value of the area can still be maintained during the construction phase. It is intended that construction works in the WNR requiring heavy equipment be focused in the the dry season because experience gained during the construction of the Hong Kong Wetland Park indicates that the substrate may be too soft for heavy machinery to rework the ponds into the required profile during the wet season.

2.2.14      Works on the ponds will involve relatively small machinery as are used during the fishpond farming cycle. Works can be kept within each individual pond after draining down as occurs during fishpond farming operations.

Work Programme

2.2.15      The programme and stages of construction are described in detail in Section 14 of this report.

2.2.16      An outline list of the main actions necessary for the creation of the marshland and enhancement of the fish pond habitats is provided in Table 2‑2. Time periods, start and completion dates for these actions are dependent on the overall residential area construction programme, which has yet to be finalised.

2.2.17      Prior to construction works associated with the Residential Development and the WNR all ponds will continue to be managed under their existing aquaculture regime (aquaculture production).

2.2.18      The broad strategy proposed is to stage enhancement works to reduce disturbance and to complete habitat enhancement works within the northern part of the site before construction of the residential development (in the southern part of the site) commences.

2.2.19      The first stage will involve, enhancement works in the 13 existing ponds located within Sector 1 (Figure 2‑10). Once these works are complete then work can commence on ponds within Sector 2.

2.2.20      On completion of enhancement works in Sectors 1 and 2, works can commence on construction of the Created Marsh Habitat and formation of the residential area. It is proposed to coordinate these ativities to minimise use of heavy machinery on the site. Once the main structure of the marsh is formed, works can commence on Sector 3.

2.2.21      Following enhancement fishponds will be managed under the modified regime outlined in the Habitat Creation and Management Plan.

2.2.22      The major construction works involved in pond enhancement relate to the removal of bunds between adjoining ponds. To minimise disturbance to the rest of the site it is proposed that enhancement works are conducted on one pair of ponds at a time.

2.2.23      Figure 2‑11 illustrates the location of new bunds. Further details are discussed in the Habitat Creation and Management Plan (Section 14).

Interim Management

2.2.24      To compensate for disturbance associated with the construction of the residential development and the WNR, it is proposed that ponds in Sectors 1, 2 and 3 will be managed according to an interim management regime that is intended to enhance their short-term value for Species of Conservation Importance, particularly wetland birds. Enhancement will be achieved through the following specific actions which have yielded demonstrated improvements to the value of fishponds for wetland birds when implemented elsewhere in Hong Kong:

·        The fish populations within ponds will vary greatly depending on previous management. A rapid assessment of remaining populations will be carried out and ponds re-stocked, as required, with trash fish species;

·        Initial and ongoing correction of water quality, specifically pH to ensure appropriate conditions for fish survival. Although trash fish species are relatively hardy compared to many commercial fish, they can be affected by low pH conditions. If pH drops below 4.5 then peanut residue will be added to raise pH; and,

·        Rotational, partial drain down of pairs ponds. Once drained down each pair of ponds will be maintained with shallow water < 30 cm deep for a period of 4weeks.

Long-term Management

2.2.25      Once all construction works are completed, the WNR will be managed according to a long-term management plan following guidelines described within the Habitat Creation and Management Plan for the site.

 

Table 22         Habitat Enhancement Work Programme For The Fung Lok Wai WNR

Construction Phase

Period

Construction activities

Pre-construction Phase I

 

Jul 2010

Site handover

All ponds under existing management

Pre-construction Phase II

 

Oct 2010 – Mar 2011

Enhance Sector 1 ponds

All other ponds remain under existing management regime

Pre-construction Phase III

Apr – Sep 2011

Commence site clearance of Residential Development area and Marsh area

Enhance Sector 2 ponds

Interim management of Sector 1 ponds.

Sector 3 and marsh area ponds remain under existing management regime

Pre-construction Phase IV

Oct 2011 – Mar 2012

Continue site clearance and forming of Residential Development area

Commence Marsh Creation works

Interim management of Sector 1, 2 and 3 ponds

Pre-construction Phase V

Apr – Sep 2012

Continue site clearance and forming of Residential Development area

Complete Marsh Creation works and commence establishment

Enhance Sector 3 ponds

Interim management of Sector 1 and 2

Pre-construction Phase VI

Oct 2012 – Jun 2013

Continue site clearance and forming of Residential Development area

Establishment of Marsh habitats

Interim management of Sector 1, 2 and 3 ponds

Construction Phase

Jul 2013 – Sep 2016

Residential Development construction

Management of Marsh habitat

Interim management of Sector 1, 2 and 3 ponds

Operation Phase

Oct 2016 onwards

Occupation of Residential Development

Long-term management of the WNR

 

Improvement works of Access Road Leading to the Subject Site

2.2.26      Based on a preliminary MLP, the existing Fuk Shun Street will be used as the proposed access road of the proposed residential development and the WNR.

2.2.27      Fuk Shun Street roots from the southern side of the Site and terminates at Fuk Hi Street at northern side of Yuen Long Industrial Estate. It is currently a local road of various widths ranging between 6m to 7m. It is the principal access of Ng Uk Tsuen and other scattered developments along the road.

2.2.28      As Fuk Shun Street is currently a substandard road, the project proponent is proposed to upgrade it to a 7.3m wide single 2-lane road with standard 2m wide footpath provided on both sides of the road (see Figure 2‑8).

2.2.29      Improvement works at Fuk Shun Street is planned to be completed in the 3rd quarter of 2016 prior to the occupation of the Project.

2.2.30      Various construction activities of the improvement of access road include site clearance and formation, laying of drainage, sewerage and utilities, formation of road sub-base, levelling and compaction, road paving and installation of road furniture.

Construction Works for the Residential Development

2.2.31      The Subject site is currently occupied by a total of 56 fishponds, which are fed by rainwater. Overflowing to the nearby rivers occurs in heavy rainstorms. Figure 2‑9 presents a pond numbering system used throughout in the EIA before the construction of the WNR.

2.2.32      The residential portion of the Project will be located at the southwestern edge of the Subject Site and occupies around 5% of the entire site (approximately 4ha). A total of 5 existing bunded ponds No. 19, 23, 25, 59 and 62 will be affected.

2.2.33      All the bunds situated within the residential site will be demolished during site clearance. In order to minimise the generation of solid waste, the demolished materials from the bunds will be temporarily stored on-site and re-used as filling materials for the Project.

2.2.34      After the clearance of bunds, the affected ponds will be dredged, and filled, with fill materials spreaded over the site and compacted to form the residential area. These works will be completed prior to the commencement of foundation and superstructure works.

2.2.35      To the extent possible, pond draining and dredging will be planned during the dry seasons when water levels of the fishponds are relatively lower and the substrate will not be too soft.

2.2.36      During ponds draining, the opportunities to retain the existing pond water for reuse will be maximized through re-distribution of the pond water at the worksite to other existing ponds as far as practicable so as to avoid discharging them to the nearby river channel.

2.2.37      Excavators used in common civil works will be employed for pond dredging. From the experience of the development at Tin Shui Wai, the amount of topsoil required to be dredged is estimated to be about 0.3m deep i.e. 12,300m3 of dredged materials will be generated. The dredged substrate will also be temporarily stored and reused on-site for the establishment of the WNR.  It is anticipated that there will be no surplus dredged materials to be disposed of. If there is any, the dredged pond sediment which is usually not allowed to be disposed of at landfills and also may not be accepted by the public fill area because of its high organic content, will adopt marine disposa1. It is understood that before any disposal, a full set of parameters as required under ETWB TCW No.34/2002 will be tested to determine the disposal options.

2.2.38      Spreading and compaction of fill material will be performed at the residential area after pond filling. It is envisaged that fill materials such as marine sand or recycled C&D materials would be used for pond filling at residential area and this would be brought to site by dump trucks via the access road. The quantity of fill materials required for the residential area is estimated to be in the range of 94,300 m3.

2.2.39      Bored piling will be employed for foundation works for the residential buildings. The internal roads, drainage and utilities can be constructed under the respective development packages. The residential blocks will be constructed on suspended slab to address settlement problem while the pavement can be constructed on slab at grade. For using bored piling, it is estimated that some 180 numbers of 2.5m diameter bored piles will be required.

2.2.40      Furthermore, a small sewage pumping facilities and associated sewers will be constructed within the development to divert the sewage to public sewers leading to existing public sewerage network for ultimate treatment at Government sewage treatment works. The sewage will be domestic in nature and no industrial wastewater will be generated.

2.2.41      All the associated sewers within the residential development will be built beneath the building areas. Further details of the sewage pump house and sewers are presented in Section 8 - Sewerage and Sewage Treatment Implications.

 

2.3              Potential Concurrent Projects that Could Lead to Cumulative Impacts

2.3.1          According to the EIA study of “Yuen Long and Kam Tin Sewerage and Sewage Disposal Stage 2” (EIA-094/2004) approved on 17 June 2004, there are two schemes proposed – Conforming Scheme of 2A-1T and Alternative scheme of 2A-1. Two of the Designated Projects (DPs) identified in the project are Package 2A-1T and its alternative, which are the construction of the Yuen Long Sewerage Treatment Works (YLSTW) Effluent Pipeline. They will be close to the Project as they include the construction of pumping station to the north of YLSTW and twin rising mains. In particular the twin rising mains of Package 2A-1T will be laid from YLSTW to Tin Tsz Road in Tin Shui Wai via the southern boundary of the Project. EIA-094/2004 concluded that the Alternative scheme of 2A-1T which was further away from the Fung Lok Wai Project was the preferred option. However, the proposed sewerage project is now classified as a Category B project under the Public Works Programme. It is our understanding that Drainage Services Department (DSD) is preparing to conduct the feasibility study.  The final alignment and construction schedule of the sewerage works as discussed in the approved EIA report is not confirmed.  After carrying out and confirmation of the feasibility study, DSD will initiate the detail design process and get funding approval from the Legislative Council.  It is estimated that DSD will need years to complete the study, design and approval process. Therefore, no construction programme is available at the present stage for the proposed sewerage work.  On the other hand, construction work for the proposed residential development at the Subject Site is scheduled to complete by 2016. Since there is no anticipated overlapping of construction works between the two projects, hence cumulative dust impact assessment is considered not necessary.

2.3.2          The construction of Hong Kong Wetland Park (HKWP) has been completed and is considered to have no cumulative impact on the construction work of the Project.